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The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire!

Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/09/07 04:35 PM

I thought I would start a topic for anyone stopping by to say hello. This is the place!

I'd like to welcome everyone to the campfire, pull up a log or a blanket, get comfortable. Think of any questions you might have, any subjects you'd like to discuss, any stories you'd like to tell, and post them here, or just say hello.

I'll be stopping by this campfire as often as possible, and cannot wait to meet everyone who joins us here.

Let us all keep the eternal flame going in this campfire, by talking, laughing, and sharing with others here.

Hello to all!
I hope your week is filled with wonder!

Many Blessings,
DawnEagle

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 07/09/07 07:52 PM

ya ta say, DawnEagle,

What a nice idea. My blanket is spread here next to your campfire and I anxiously await those that will come with a question or story to share.

ashoge,
kimikaya
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place - 07/10/07 12:38 AM

This is a wonderful idea DawnEagle. Thank you for welcoming me into your circle
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/10/07 05:09 PM

Welcome to the Campfire Kimikaya and Jase! I am honored that you joined me here.

Find a comfortable spot, throw a log on the fire if you get cold, and let's begin by dedicating this space as sacred.

We give thanks to the Seven Sacred Directions, the Five Elements, the Totem Animals of the Four Directions: Eagle, Coyote, Bear, and White Buffalo, Grandfather Sun, Grandmother Moon, Father Sky, and Mother Earth, and invite them to join us in the circle.

I see the three Grandfathers are here, sitting in the NorthEast. Thank you Ancestors for adding your wisdom to our circle.

We dedicate this circle to the good of all, to healing for all, and to promote peace for all.

You may add your prayers or wishes for this circle at any time. Take the Talking Stick, and speak your truth. The Pipe awaits you.

This Native American Sacred Circle welcomes all to join us and share in the wisdom of this campfire...

Next: It's storytime!

Wishing a blessed day to all who enter here,
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place - 07/10/07 09:50 PM

DawnEagle, this is an wonderful idea. Hello, Jase and Kimikaya! My blanket is spread; I have my medicine bag and will be glad to smudge anyone who wants to share the blessings of cleansing and balancing with Sage and Cedar's give-away. I'd like to share a story; my husband and I spent the weekend near Cincinnati, Oh at Powwow. The energy was INCREDIBLE. Good, strong positive energy. We sang and danced. It's the first time I've been in the Circle and felt connected to Grandmother with each step. I'd sing with our Drum, then run out and dance till it was our turn to drum again. Anyway a young man was there; he normally attends most of the same Powwows we do. He's 15 and as most 15 year olds, he is full pee and vinegar and full of himself. Several times Elders had to remind him to settle a bit. He is a very good dancer and is quite proud of his ability and his Regalia. Just before a mens' traditional dance, the MC asked all the men to stand around the inside of the Circle and he went to each one and gave each dance the opportunity to speak to the crowd; share their names, tribal affiliatios, etc. When he approached the young man I've been telling you about, the young man said, "get that microphone out of my face!" (he's having a difficult time learning respect for his elders, I'd reckon). Anyway, just as he finished disrespecting his Elder the choker he'd been wearing (one my husband gifted to him) fell off his throat and onto the ground. I've seen this sort of thing happen before. So....I guess my point of this long dissertation is this.....Spirit certainly demonstrated his displeasure at this youngin's actions this weekend. He truly is a fine young man, with enormous potential. I'm just not sure how to deal with him. He disrepected me twice along with several other drum members. I think it's time to talk with his mother. Don't you? How would you handle it? Does it 'take a village'? Many, many good things happened; I'm sure the Spirits were there and happy to see the people dancing in the Circle. It's always so good to see friends who live far away, again and to catch up on all that's happened to each other over the winter. Many smiling, sun-burnt faces, fry-bread, the wonderful scent of sage smoke, bare feet and moccasin covered feet dancing, braided hair decorated with feathers, colorful cloth dresses, skin dresses and long fringe swaying with each step, little girls with their fancy shawls.....oh how I love powwow!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/11/07 05:28 PM

Welcome to the Campfire Conni! I am honored that you have joined us. I think smudging is an excellent idea, if you would please do the honors. I thank you.

It sounds as if you had a wonderful time at the pow wow, and are still full of energy from it all. This is a great thing to see here. You charge our circle with your energy. The Fire dances.

I do believe that it takes a village to raise a child, and your young man may have seen the village react to his disrespectful ways. The spirits sure made their opinion known!
Don't you just love it when the spirits speak to us in this manner! Hopefully he will see their message and take it to heart.

I found out this morning that Corbin Harney has passed away from cancer, just yesterday. This is truly sad news. For more information, you can go to:BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place - 07/11/07 09:19 PM

I did not know who Corbin Harney was. It saddens me when our elders walk on; we need their teachings......desperately. Do you know of Grandfather Joseph Flying Bye? He is another elder who has walked on. He did however, leave a set of recordings of his own voice of teachings about Chanupa and the Sacred Pipe Filling Songs. I'm trying to learn them right now....its not easy. But I know I'm supposed to learn them.

Did you bring your dove feather into the house or did you leave it in your garden?

I do love it when the Spirits speak to us. Their language may not be what we know, but they can sure get their point across IF we listen with our ears AND our eyes.

Waiting for your story........

Peace to all who visit this Circle.
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/11/07 11:23 PM

It is sad when the wise ones pass. No, I have not heard of Grandfather Joseph Flying Bye. Is there a link you could share?

For those of you who do not know, Corbin Harney was a Western Shoshone Spiritual Leader, who focused on stopping nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, and started Shundahai Network, among other things. He died of cancer, from the radiation on the reservation. Very sad.

The dove feather came in with me for now. It is on a piece of a knot from a cottonwood tree right now. I am thinking I need prayer feathers from the dove. I have many dove feathers!

A little story: I like to put out birdseed for the birds, and just sit and watch them some days. Mostly we have juncos, chickadees, sparrows, doves, and a few red-headed finches. There is one bird, who is always very shaky when he comes up, just twittering all over the place. I am thinking something is wrong with him. He always comes with another bird. They are chickadees. The other bird will actually pick up the bird seed in its beak, and put it inside the beak of the twittering one, feeding him. I think it is astounding that these birds take care of the weak ones, helping them. A lesson for us all.

I'll bring a real story back with me later. Gotta go make some enchiladas for dinner right now, green chile chicken.

Keep the fire lit, I'll be back later!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/12/07 04:21 PM

I come bringing a story. This is one of my favorites:

The Creator gathered all of Creation and said:

"I want to hide something from the humans until they are ready for it. It is the realization that they create their own reality."

The eagle said, "Give it to me, I will take it to the moon."

The Creator said, "No. One day they will go there and find it."

The salmon said, "I will bury it on the bottom of the ocean."

"No. They will go there too."

The buffalo said, "I will bury it on the Great Plains."

The Creator said, "They will cut into the skin of the Earth and find it even there."


Grandmother Mole, who lives in the breast of Mother Earth, and who has no physical eyes but sees with spiritual eyes, said, "Put it inside of them."

And the Creator said, "It is done."


A Lakota/Dakota tale

May your day be blessed,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/12/07 04:56 PM

And now a little humor. This one is called Navajo Women.

Three Indian women died and were brought before the Creator for judgment.
Creator said,"I will let you into the Spirit World if the beliefs you lived by were proper. Tell me what you believed when you were alive."
The Lakota woman said, "I have always believed in the Grandfathers and the Generations, and that is how I lived my life."
"Fine," said Creator. "You may enter and sit on my left.
What did you believe?" he asked of the Arapaho woman.
"I have always believed in Goodness, and I have tried to live my life in a good way."
"Fine! You may also enter and sit on my right."
Then he turned to the third woman, a Navajo. "And what do you believe?"
The Navajo woman said, "I believe you're sitting in my chair!"
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place - 07/13/07 07:40 AM

DawnEagle and all....here is a link to Grandfather Joseph Flying Bye. There really isn't a lot about him. This is the most informative one I could find. Please note; I am in no way affiliated or connected with Center Records, although I have purchased two of his recordings and I highly recommend them to anyone who wants better understanding of Chanupa.

BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place - 07/13/07 04:28 PM

Hello to all who join us at this campfire,
I hope you are having a wonderful day!

I want to remind you that tomorrow morning is the New Moon (Thunder Moon) at 8:03am EDT. This is a good time to work on protection, such as smudging your sacred space.

Today I will share another favorite story of mine. Enjoy!

Spider Rock - A Dine/Navajo Tale

Spider Rock stands with awesome dignity and beauty over 800 feet high in Arizona's colourful Canyon de Chelly National Park (pronounced da Shay). Geologists of the National Park Service say that "the formation began 230 million years ago.

Windblown sand swirled and compressed with time created the spectacular red sandstone monolith. Long ago, the Dine (Navajo) Indian tribe named it Spider Rock.

Stratified, multicolored cliff walls surround the canyon. For many, many centuries the Dine (Navajo) built caves and lived in these cliffs. Most of the caves were located high above the canyon floor, protecting them from enemies and flash floods.

Spider Woman possessed supernatural power at the time of creation, when Dine (Navajo) emerged from the third world into this fourth world.

At that time, monsters roamed the land and killed many people. Since Spider Woman loved the people, she gave power for Monster- Slayer and Child-Born-of-Water to search for the Sun-God who was their father. When they found him, Sun-God showed them how to destroy all the monsters on land and in the water.

Because she preserved their people, Dine (Navajo) established Spider Woman among their most important and honoured Deities.
She chose the top of Spider Rock for her home. It was Spider Woman who taught Dine (Navajo) ancestors of long ago the art of weaving upon a loom. She told them, "My husband, Spider Man, constructed the weaving loom making the cross poles of sky and earth cords to support the structure; the warp sticks of sun rays, lengthwise to cross the woof; the healds of rock crystal and sheet lightning, to maintain original condition of fibres.
For the batten, he chose a sun halo to seal joints, and for the comb he chose a white shell to clean strands in a combing manner." Through many generations, the Dine (Navajo) have always been accomplished weavers.

From their elders, Dine (Navajo) children heard warnings that if they did not behave themselves, Spider Woman would let down her web- ladder and carry them up to her home and devour them!
The children also heard that the top of Spider Rock was white from the sun-bleached bones of Dine (Navajo) children who did not behave themselves!

One day, a peaceful cave-dwelling Dine (Navajo) youth was hunting in Dead Man's Canyon, a branch of Canyon de Chelly. Suddenly, he saw an enemy tribesman who chased him deeper into the canyon. As the peaceful Dine (Navajo) ran, he looked quickly from side to side, searching for a place to hide or to escape.

Directly in front of him stood the giant obelisk-like Spider Rock. What could he do? He knew it was too difficult for him to climb. He was near exhaustion. Suddenly, before his eyes he saw a silken cord hanging down from the top of the rock tower.
The Dine (Navajo) youth grasped the magic cord. which seemed strong enough, and quickly tied it around his waist. With its help he climbed the tall tower, escaping from his enemy who then gave up the chase.

When the peaceful Dine (Navajo) reached the top, he stretched out to rest. There he discovered a most pleasant place with eagle's eggs to eat and the night's dew to drink.

Imagine his surprise when he learned that his rescuer was Spider Woman! She told him how she had seen him and his predicament. She showed him how she made her strong web-cord and anchored one end of it to a point of rock. She showed him how she let down the rest of her web-cord to help him to climb the rugged Spider Rock.

Later, when the peaceful Dine (Navajo) youth felt assured his enemy was gone, he thanked Spider Woman warmly and he safely descended to the canyon floor by using her magic cord. He ran home as fast as he could run, reporting to his tribe how his life was saved by Spider Woman!

Source (and a great site for Native American Lore!):
BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: _OMPI_

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/14/07 02:48 PM

Halito...
hello everyone, i was just reading the stories and can feel the peace here and decided to ask if could join the circle. i havent been here in a while and love to return and catch up on everything.
i dont have much to add to the get together, but am glad to be among friends. perhaps each of us can tell of where we live and how our summer has been up to this point.
i live in the panhandle of texas and the weather here this year has been very good to us. lots of rain and very little heat. our gardens are blossoming and the dove and other birds are plentiful, and beautiful as well. havent been on vacation as of yet this year dont know if we will have time to venture far nor the funds, perhaps a short camping trip would be nice. i recently wss in santa fe and speaking of smudging noticed that several peoples were selling smudge sticks, one of the elder nattive americans who had them to sell told me he starts his day everyday cleansing and purifying his home and his space. he shared with me his ingredients for his smudge sticks and i am going to look around and try and make some like he was using, the smells and aromas, seemed to take you to another place..it was a good visit...well i am glad to be among good people and friends and look forward to more stories and learning about those of us here in the circle..in the spriti of our ancestors..
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/14/07 10:47 PM

*passes around rice krispy treats with mini m&m's*

Hello all. My name is Jase. Yes, I may have been born Jason, but the person I am is Jase.

I come from a HUGE family, however, it seems my family is so small now. After loosing the people I called mom and dad, it seems I became the unnoticed one. While they are my blood and I love them, they seem to have stopped loving or even noticing me. I am thankful for my siblings from my birthmother. They are not only my family but friends.

I want to share with you all that while genetics and blood make us all family, a true family cares not about blood, but the person. Some of the best and most loyal family I have are not related to me by blood. They are my family of choice, not circumstance, and to them I am always grateful.

So, anyone like to cook?
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/15/07 02:31 PM

Hello All,

Am I too late for the campfire? I bring peace and blessings from the Creator with me. I have no Native American tales to tell but enjoy "listening" to your stories here. I love to cook, Jase but am not a chef by any means, I could be if I ever chose to go that route, but I am happy just making and dressing up meals here for the family when I can.

My name is Vance and I am in training right now to be the new editor for the pro wrestling forum here at Bella.

I live in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan about a half mile from the Saginaw Chippewa Reservation and I am very good friends with the Tribal Chief, Mr. Fred Cantu and his wife Denise.

I bring some baked chicken with a hint of lemon butter to the fire for everyone to enjoy.
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/15/07 04:18 PM

Good Morning everyone, and welcome to the campfire!

Jase, as always, glad you are here smile I agree with you about family, I have family members all across the country, very few connected by blood. I think you choose your family.

OMPI, Amadeus, welcome, we are glad you have joined us.
And those rice crispy treats and the baked chicken sound wonderful!

I am a former chef, and still love to cook, just not under the direction of others (haha!). I come bringing breakfast, New Mexico style: Huevos Rancheros with chipotle chicken, fresh refried beans, fried potatoes, and homemade green chile sauce. I hope you like it hot!

OMPI, you are in Texas panhandle - that's not too far from Albuquerque. Good to know a neighbor!

So far this summer has been extraordinarily hot here, and we still await the monsoon season, yet the garden is growing well. I pulled a foot long zucchini the other day - it's huge! And no growth hormones... I have not done much with the summer myself, but wanting to get some camping time in soon. I like the hot springs here up in Jemez, Navajo Lake up in the four corners area, and Canyon de Chelley just over in Arizona, and am hoping to get to them all sometime soon.

I have not been to Santa Fe in a while. I will have to go up there and look for the Elder with the magical smudge sticks!

And speaking of birds, I have all kinds of them here. I live right on the Rio Grande, next to the bosque, and all the water fowl frequent these parts, as well as plenty of chickadees, junco's and doves. I even have a white dove that visits occassionally.

Amadeus, glad you have joined us here at BellaOnline. Welcome! Your connection to the Chippewa Reservation sounds interesting. Maybe you have some stories to share? heehee! I'm always looking for a story!

I will be back a little later today with a story for everyone. In the meantime, enjoy your Sunday. I hope it is filled with plenty of love and laughter!

Peace and Blessings to all who enter here,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/16/07 04:37 PM

Good Morning everyone!

I hope all is well on this beautiful day. The birds are chirping, Grandfather Sun is shining brightly, and we got a little rain yesterday...it should be a great day!

As usual, the day got away from me yesterday, and I forgot to come back and post the story I promised. Here it is, another one of my favorites smile

Colors

Once upon a time the colors of the world started to quarrel: all
claimed that they were the best, the most important, the most useful, the favorite.

GREEN said: "Clearly I am the most important. I am the sign of life and of hope. I was chosen for grass, trees, leaves - without me, all animals would die. Look over the countryside and you will see that I am in the majority."

BLUE interrupted: "You only think about the earth, but consider the sky and the sea. It is the water that is the basis of life and drawn up by the clouds from the deep sea. The sky gives space and peace and serenity. Without my peace, you would all be nothing."

YELLOW chuckled: "You are all so serious. I bring laughter, gaiety, and warmth into the world. The sun is yellow, the moon is yellow, the stars are yellow. Every time you look at a sunflower, the whole world starts to smile. Without me there would be no fun."

ORANGE started next to blow her trumpet: "I am the color of health and strength. I may be scarce, but I am precious for I serve the needs of human life. I carry the most important vitamins. Think of carrots, pumpkins, oranges, mangoes, and pawpaws. I don't hang around all the time, but when I fill the sky at sunrise or sunset, my beauty is so striking that no one gives another thought to any of you."

RED could stand it no longer. He shouted out: "I am the ruler of all of you - I am blood - life's blood! I am the color of danger and of bravery. I am willing to fight for a cause. I bring fire into the blood. Without me, the earth would be as empty as the moon. I am the color of passion and of love, the red rose, the poinsettia and the poppy."

PURPLE rose up to his full height. He was very tall and spoke with great pomp: "I am the color of royalty and power. Kings, chiefs, and bishops have always chosen me for I am the sign of authority and wisdom. People do not question me - they listen and obey."

Finally, INDIGO spoke, much more quietly than all the others, but
with just as much determination: "Think of me. I am the color of
silence. You hardly notice me, but without me you all become
superficial. I represent thought and reflection, twilight and deep water. You need me for balance and contrast, for prayer and inner peace."

And so the colors went on boasting, each convinced of his or her own superiority. Their quarreling became louder and louder.

Suddenly there was a startling flash of bright lightening - thunder rolled and boomed. Rain started to pour down relentlessly. The colors crouched down in fear, drawing close to one another for comfort.

In the midst of the clamor, rain began to speak: "You foolish colors, fighting amongst yourselves, each trying to dominate the rest. Don't you know that you were each made for a special purpose, unique and different? Join hands with one another and come to me."

Doing as they were told, the colors united and joined hands. The rain continued: "From now on, when it rains, each of you will stretch across the sky in a great bow of color as a reminder that you can all live in peace. The rainbow is a sign of hope for tomorrow."

And so, whenever a good rain washes the world, and a rainbow appears in the sky, let us remember to appreciate one another.

Based on a Native American Legend

From Blue Panther Keeper of Stories, an MSN group


If anyone else would like to share a story, joke, or a little wisdom here, feel free. I now pass the Talking Stick...


In peace,
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/17/07 11:59 AM

There was this hunter and he was a devout atheist. He never wanted anything to do with God or anyone who spoke of God.

Well, one day whilst on a hunt, a large grizzly bear came up behind him, knocked him down and stood over him. The bear raised a claw into the air and was about to swipe and kill the hunter when the man said, "Dear God, please hgelp me."

Suddenly, everything stopped. The wind stopped blowing, the bear was frozen, the birds stopped singing and a voice boomed from the sky:

All of your life, someone has tried to tell you about me and you wanted nothing to do with me, now that you are in danger, you ask for my help. Tell me, why should I help you?

The hunter thought for a moment and said, "Well, if you won't help me, will you at least make the bear a Christian?"

God spoke again and said, "It is done".

Everything started moving again and the bear lowered his paw. The hunter was happy until the bear said, "Dear Father, for this meal I am about to receive, I am truly grateful..."

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/17/07 09:54 PM

Good one Amadeus. Good one. You made me laugh out loud! DawnEagle...you're stories are wonderful. Always a lesson.....but that's what they're all about, aren't they? Life's lessons taught in a gentle and good way.

My summer has been rather eventful, I'd say. Granddaughter born (actually THAT was is January....) but it's July and she's still growing and becoming more and more beautiful.

May brought a learning 'powwow' at Camp Perry in Ohio; hosted by the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. We (and many others) spent the weekend with hundreds of kids and parents teaching them about the old ways; telling stories; explaining about Regalia....singing, drumming. It was a good weekend. Those kids were really interested and wanted to know about the Native ways.

June gave us another Powwow in Franklin, Ohio. Fantastical!! Good things happened that weekend, too. A friend gifted me with a Blue Heron wing fan that he had made. I'll cherish it always.

Found out my sister has pheochromocytoma. It's a cancer of the adrenal gland and she and her doctors are making preparations for its removal. I've had several conversations with Creator about this. I'd like to ask everyone to share a prayer for her if it isn't assumtive to ask. Her name is Chris. I love her very much.

Another Powwow this coming weekend near Toledo. We'll camp. Hope there are lots of drums 'cuz that means lots of opportunities for dancing!

My husband and I rebuilt our sweat lodge last weekend and our friend from Cincinnat came to pour water for us. It turned out to be only my David and John; I kept the fire...I know that isn't traditional....but it was all done in a good and respectful way. It's all good.

Food! I don't like to cook it, but I love to eat it! I like to bake, so David and I fit together nicely in the kitchen. He cooks; I eats and cleans up. Works out well.

Jase, you are so right about family. I don't come from a large family; strangely enough I don't come from a 'broken home', either. Somewhat dysfuntional....but intact. Of course, I love them all. I'm closer to my brother, I believe. We were kinda made out of the same mold. Since I've been on my Spiritual path; the Red Road Path, however, I've met people who have been my family since the beginning of time. I know some of you will understand that.

Okay, then.....'nough said.

Amadeus....good to see you again. Congrats on your new gig. Jase, I was missing you...Welcome OMPI! DawnEagle, may I take your stories and repeat them to the children? We have another learning powwow in cincinnati this fall, and it would be good to have new stories to tell.

Friends, peace be with each of you. Peace and the gentle warmth of Creator's love.

Conni
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/18/07 02:10 AM

A little boy goes to his father and asks "Daddy, how was I born? "

The father answers: "Well son, I guess one day you will need to find out anyway! Your Mom and I first got together in a chat room on Yahoo. Then I set up a date via e-mail with your Mom and we met at a cyber-cafe. We sneaked into a secluded room, where your mother agreed to a download from my hard drive. As soon as I was ready to upload, we discovered that neither one of us had used a firewall, and since it was too late to hit the delete button, nine months later a little Pop-Up appeared that said: 'You've got Male!'"

Moral of the story - Children aren't always as gullible as you think!
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/19/07 11:55 AM

That was pretty funny Obsidiana. Good story.
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/19/07 10:25 PM

Hello to all,

I see I have a little catching up to do on this topic, I am glad to see others have joined us here at the campfire. Welcome Obsidiana! You told a wonderful story, I loved it!

Jase, you are too funny! You've got Male! hahaha!

Vance, I loved the Christian Bear story, too much. Thank you.

Thank you all for your wonderful stories, and for the laughs. It helps to keep the campfire warm with so many lively spirits here.

Conni, I think it is a wonderful thing to teach the children. You have my permission to use anything of mine that you choose for those little ones who are our future. Enjoy the pow wow. And prayers going up for your sister, may she be well.

I put out a new article today on Sacred Herbs, and am using the forum topic about herbs as a link to it. So I am trying to build up a few herb references there, if anyone has anything they could add to that thread, it would be much appreciated.

I will bring another story soon, either tonight or tomorrow. In the meantime, keep the fire going, for I foresee many joining us....

Now, who's got the marshmallows?

Posted By: Gayle-Coffee Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/20/07 01:24 PM

Hmmm... no marshmallows, but I've got chocolate (with ground espresso of course) and graham crackers! We can make smores!

Hi everyone, love the stories, think I'll stay a while.
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/20/07 04:41 PM

Welcome Gayle,
Thanks for the smores! I love them! And for the coffee, always needed at a campfire!

I promised another story, so let me find one real quick for us.... (that's the pause before the story, while I think of an appropriate tale to tell!)

Since it is gardening time, I have chosen this one, to remind us of the sacredness of all of life:

The Corn Spirit - Tuscarora

Long ago, they say, there was a village of people whose cornfields were blessed with good harvests, year after year. They had so much corn each year that they began to take it for granted. They stopped weeding the fields and the children trampled the cornstalks as they played.

When harvest time came, the people picked, but they did not do it well.

Much of the corn was left unpicked and only the birds ate it. The people wasted more than they ate. They threw ears of corn to their dogs.

As they had always done, they dried some of the corn to eat in the winter and use for seed corn the next spring. They placed this corn in storage baskets to bury for the winter, but they did everything carelessly. The corn baskets were not well made. The storage holes were not dug deeply or well covered.

"There is much game in the forest," the people said. "We can always hunt to survive, even if the stored corn spoils."

So the people went on without showing respect for the corn that gave them life. They even forgot to say thanks to the Creator for their good fortune.

Only one man remembered to show respect. His name was Dayohagwenda. Dayohagwenda cared for his fields and weeded them. He harvested his corn carefully and gave thanks for his good harvest. He stored his corn with great care. He was sad about the way the others acted.

That autumn, after the harvest moon, the people went hunting. But the hunters had bad luck. Animals were hard to find. It seemed that the deer and moose and even the rabbits had all disappeared from the forest.

The people tried to fish, but the streams and lakes were empty.

Finally, the people dug up their stored corn. But the poorly made baskets had fallen apart. Much of the corn had been eaten by mice. The rest had rotted away.

"What shall we do?" the people said. "We will starve."

Meanwhile, Dayohagwenda was walking in the forest. He was thinking about the way his people no longer showed respect for the corn or gave thanks.

As he walked, he found an old trail. It led to a clearing in the forest. In that clearing was a lodge made of elm bark and built on top of a mound of earth. Weeds grew all around the lodge. In front of the lodge, an old man dressed in torn clothing sat weeping.

"Grandfather," Dayohagwenda said, "why are you weeping?"

"I am weeping because your people have forgotten me."

"Why are your clothes torn?"

"They are torn because your people threw me to their dogs."

"Why are you so dirty?"

"I am dirty because your people let their children trample me."

"Why are there weeds around your lodge?"

"Your people no longer take care of me. Now I must go away and I can never return again to help them."

Now Dayohagwenda knew who the old man was. He was Corn Spirit.
"Grandfather," Dayohagwenda said, "do not leave us. I still respect you. I will go back and remind my people how to treat you."

The old man stopped weeping. "Grandson," he said, "I will stay with you. If your people show me respect, I will not leave them."

Dayohagwenda went back to the village. "We are going to starve," the people said. "Our corn is gone and we have no other food."
"Listen," said Dayohagwenda, "I have been in the forest. There I found a lodge surrounded by weeds and an old man wearing torn clothing the color of corn husks. He said his people deserted him and he was going to leave forever."

The people understood. "It is Corn Spirit," they said. "He has left us and now we will surely die."

"No," said Dayohagwenda, "I spoke with Corn Spirit. I told him we would treat him with respect. He said that if we respect him, he will help us through the winter."

Then Dayohagwenda dug up his own stored corn. His baskets had been well made. He had dug his granary deep and covered it properly. All of his harvest was there.

There was more than he had remembered storing, much more. There was enough to feed the whole village through the winter. There was even enough left to use as seed corn for planting in the spring when the leaves of the maple tree were the size of a squirrel's ear.

From then on, Dayohagwenda's people always showed respect for the corn.

They planted with care and hoed and weeded.
They sang songs of thanksgiving as they harvested.
They made strong baskets and deep storage pits for their granaries.

Most of all, they remembered to give thanks for the blessing of corn and all of the other good things they had been given.
They taught their children and their children's children to do the same.

So it is to this day.

- Source : "Neshoba".

Another great Native Lore site:BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/20/07 04:44 PM

btw, Gayle is our Coffee editor here. I tend to visit her forum because of all the wonderful coffee aromas that lead me to it. Being a coffee lover, it was not hard to find!

Thanks for joining our campfire Gayle, we are honored to have you here.

Many Blessings,
Posted By: Gayle-Coffee Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/20/07 08:49 PM

Aw Shucks DawnEagle!

You're making me feel so special!

I am loving sitting around the campfire too!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/21/07 08:47 PM

Ya Ta Say my fellow "camp-sitters",

I see the fire is still burning brightly and the food excellent.
I have so enjoyed the stories and yours, Dawn Eagle, especially. I have loved the story of "COLORS" since I was a little girl and it was so nice to hear again.

I come empty-handed but would like to accept the "Talking Stick" from Dawn Eagle and tell a tale.....one that brings tears to my heart as it does to Chief Dan George.

For I have an "adopted" wolf whom I love dearly even though she lives across the country. Her name is Mireya and she is quite a beauty with a temperament to match.

My story as told by the Chief: I wanted to give something of my past to my grandson. So I took him into the woods, to a quiet spot. Seated at my feet he listened as I told him of the powers that were given to each creature. He moved not a muscle as I explained how the woods had always provided us with food, homes, comfort, and religion. He was awed when I related to him how the wolf became our guardian, and when I told him that I would sing the Sacred Wolf Song over him, he was overjoyed. In my song, I appealed to the wolf to come and preside over us while I would perform the wolf ceremony so that the bondage between my grandson and the wolf would be lifelong. I sang.

In my voice was the hope that clings to every heartbeat. I sang.

In my words were the powers I inherited from my forefathers. I sang.

In my cupped hands lay a spruce seed -- the link to creation. I sang.

In my eyes sparkled love. I sang.

And the song floated on the sun's rays from tree to tree.

When I had ended, it was if the whole world listened with us to hear the wolf's reply. We waited a long time but none came. Again I sang, humbly but as invitingly as I could, until my throat ached and my voice gave out.

All of a sudden I realized why no wolves had heard my Sacred Song. There were none left! My heart filled with tears. I could no longer give my grandson faith in the past, our past.

At last I could whisper to him: "It is finished!".
"Can I go home now?" He asked, checking his watch to see if he would still be in time to catch his favorite program on TV.
I watched him disappear and wept in silence.
ALL IS FINISHED!

by Chief Dan George (chief of the Salish Band in Burrard Inlet, B.C.)

.....with tears in my heart "All is finished".
wakan tanan kici un.....May the Great Spririt Bless You.
kimi kaya
Posted By: DreamyMystique

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/22/07 04:42 PM

I am also new, and I have a story.

I am mixed blood, Cherokee/Choctaw and European. I was raised away from the community and have not learned many of the old ways. I have always had a longing for such knowledge, for membership in the community. I have two children, ages 7 and 11, and a Non-Native husband. I have no been able to introduce them to their Native heritage properly and have also had a longing to do this.

A kind man I had become acquainted with on a different forum is Cherokee as well. He told me about a pow wow outside of Sherwood, Ohio, that would have a significant Cherokee representation. I brought my family to this pow wow. It was different from the many others I have attended. Previous pow wows were of a more commercialized sort; they were large, sponsored by a university, held indoors in a sports arena.

This pow wow was small. It was community. I made friends with the vendors; I was more than a customer. I was a member of the community.

It was held outdoors as pow wows should be. The PA system did not hurt my ears. There were no crowds pushing and jostling. My children danced. I felt a great pride seeing my children dance, experience a taste of their heritage.

I met this kind man who had told me about the pow wow. He was as wonderful and I expected him to be.

I was given two precious gifts at the pow wow. I also met this man's wife. She told me about this site, as well. I was given the gift of her friendship. She also gave me a beautiful, crimson shawl. It is truly a thing of beauty and among my most treasured possessions now.

No, that is wrong. I was given three precious gifts: friendship, a shawl, and seeing my children dance, experience a bit of being NDN.

That is my story. To this lovely woman, I say wa-do.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/23/07 01:38 PM

DreamyMystique,
Your thanks is humbly accepted. It was MY pleasure and priviledge to be part of your special day.

Kimikaya.....your story makes me cry. The wolves are coming back! So are the bear....we live in Southwestern Ohio and the black bear are here! They haven't been here in many, many years. Maybe they know we need their help. Bear Spirit is my helper. Has been with me since I was a small....really small child.
Coyote is coming back, too. There are lots of them....and bobcats! There here, again!

Another pow wow weekend! Good strong positive energy. A couple renewed their marriage vows in the Sacred Circle. There were just 2 drums, but each drum did a set of three songs in a row. I like that system. Gives the other drum a good break.

On Friday afternoon my David and I were on our way home from taking our Cocker to the 'big house'....the kennel. A hawk had been hit by a car and was lying dead on the road. We turned back so I could pick her up. She was a young bird. Her body was badly broken; I offered tobacco and sprinkled some on her and we took her home. When we got home, I placed her in a plastic bag on a bed of sage and laid sprigs of cedar on top of her before closing the bag. She had to be placed in the freezer until we can take her to a young man who will do the right thing with her. (he's one of those young people who is an Elder....I don't know how to explain it; I reckon most of you know what I mean). He will know how to honor her in the right way. David will take her to him this Friday. I cried and cried. The birds of prey are just beginning to come back...hawks have been here for a good while, but the eagles returned only 3 - 4 years ago.

Next pow wow is in Bellfontaine, Ohio in 2 weeks. It's the second Shawnee pow wow for the year. They host 2 each year. A really good one, folks. Worth a weekend road trip!

'nuff words for now.....need to try and find the physical energy to unload the car and put things away. We drummed and sang for 10 hours Saturday and 8 hours Sunday.....5 hour trip home. I'm a tired old woman. Robert Frost's 'Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening' comes to mind...."And miles to go before I sleep; and miles to go before I sleep....."

I pass the Talking Stick onto the next.....
Peace be with each of you throughout the day.
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/23/07 05:47 PM

Happy Monday to all gathered here at the campfire. It is a wonderful feeling of energy I get just stopping by. I thank you all for your wonderful stories, and heartfelt words, I am honored to be amongst you.

The Gallup Intertribal Ceremonial will be on August 8 - 12 this year, and that is the next one I will attend. Rodeos, dancing, and Navajo tacos - I can't wait!

Conni, I'm glad you were the one to find the Hawk. A very sad thing to happen. No words come, only feelings...and prayers.

Later this week I will be Entering the Silence, and will be gone for two days, probably Wednesday and Thursday. I know I leave the campfire in good hands.

I welcome those of you who have just joined us, and thank you for being here.

On Saturday I passed around white candles on some of my other sites, and I'd like to do the same here. I feel that we need a little positivity right now, and want to offer the candles to be lit in the name of peace, and healing for us all. My candle is lit, and I offer it to you all, to surround us all with it's bright white light, bringing peace and positivity. Will you light a candle with me?

I loved the wolf story, I can never hear that one enough. We do need to pay attention to the disappearing animals, and that story reminds us of how the sacredness of this world is not being passed on to the children. Thanks to Conni for teaching the children about these important lessons from our past through the stories she will tell.

I will be back later with a story. In the meantime, everyone have a wonderful, peace-filled day.

Walk in Beauty,
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/23/07 06:34 PM

DawnEagle,
May I ask what and why about 'Entering the Silence'? Ceremony?
I understand there are some things we shouldn't discuss in forum and if it is inappropriate for me to ask you'll need to tell me, please.

When should the white candles be lit and how long should we keep them lit?

Blessings,
Conni
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/23/07 08:58 PM


Yes, DawnEagle, my white candle is now lit with the hope that its' bright light, right here in front of me, will be a reminder of the important role that positivity should play in my life.

It is lit in the name of peace and healing for us all.

ashoge,
kimikaya
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/24/07 04:28 PM

A prayer that was sent to me by a friend that I would like to share with all here enjoying the wonderful company and campfire.

I only wish I could include the picture of a beautiful Native American woman who is offering up smoke in the shape of a dove.
But we can close our eyes and imagine as we pray:

Oh Great Spirit,

Let your voice whisper righteousness in our ears through the East Wind of the break of day.

Let us be blessed with the love for all our
brothers and sisters on the Earth so we
may truly live in peace.

Let us have good health mentally and
physically to solve our problems and
accomplish something for future generations.

Let us be sincere to ourselves and make the
world a better place to live.

Aho Mitakuye Oyasin All My Relations.

I do not know what the last line says, but I am sure there is someone here that can tell us.....

Let us all live in Peace.
kimikaya
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/24/07 06:36 PM

Hello to all!

I trust your day is going well, and sunshine surrounds you. It is hot already here in Albuquerque today, and I sit here watching the birds outside finding shade.

Conni, the candle is metaphorical, as I know not how to put a real candle here.. wish I did! You can light a real one at your home, or just send the energy of a lit candle to the forum, it works either way. I prefer the 7-day candles myself, they help to clear the negativity from the air. They generally burn for about 3 days. If using a taper, let it burn out if you can.

To me, Entering the Silence is going within on a journey of discovery. Being one who has visions, I find that from time to time I am invited to "Enter the Silence" to see and understand more of the things that are happening in my life or in the world. It is similar to a VisionQuest, in that I will fast, and remain alone, until I find the answers I seek. This time I am being urged by the Ancestors, to do this. I dare not refuse their request, for to do so would spoil my relationship with them. This time, it will take a couple of days to watch, listen, and learn. Usually, I do this in an overnight fast, but this time, more is involved, as they are teaching me many things at this time. To Enter the Silence is to listen to only the voices within oneself, at the center of oneself, to go into the Cave of Darkness, and come out and see everything with new eyes, just as Mother Bear does when she awakens each Spring. The urgency of the message this time concerns me, so I prepare quickly to leave.

I will tell you as much as I can when I return.

Kimikaya, I really enjoyed the prayer, and thank you for posting it. Mitakuye Oyasin means we are all connected, All Our Relations means all creatures great and small, therefore, we are all connected to all beings, and what one does to one, one does to us all.

Just as the light of the candle surrounds us all, so does the energy of the universe. The Web of life includes all things, and connects us all.

Keep the fire burning, I return with a story...
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/24/07 06:38 PM

This is another of my favorite stories. I leave it for you to enjoy in my absence.

Coyote and The Another One...

As told by Charles Phillip Whitedog

Two Coyotes were crossing a farmers field. Both Coyotes were strangers to each other for they had never met. Just as they were about to introduce themselves they heard the farmer yell, "There's a Coyote in the field!" The first Coyote turned to the other and told him to run! They both started to run for the trees when they heard the farmer yell, "And there goes another one!". Finally both Coyotes made it to the cover of the trees and they started to introduce themselves. "I never saw you before, I am Wanderer, I am a Coyote like you." The other Coyote looked at him oddly and said, "I am Sleek, but I am not a Coyote like you."
"Yes you are," said Wanderer.

"Oh no I am not," replied Sleek.

"Look my friend, you are confused. You have ears like mine, you have a tail like mine, our fur is the same, our snouts are the same, everything is the same, you are just like me and we are both Coyotes," Wanderer tried to explain. "Listen let's run across the field again and you will see," challenged Sleek. So off they ran. First went Wanderer and again the Farmer yelled, "There goes that darn Coyote." Then Sleek took afoot and the Farmer yelled, "And there goes another one... again!"

When the two Coyotes reached the other side of the field they ducked into the woods. Wanderer turned to sleek and said, "There! Didn't you hear the Farmer? He called us both Coyotes." Sleek look disappointed with his new confused friend and said, "Yes I heard the Farmer. He called you a Coyote, but I am an `Another One'."

Our problem is, we are listening to the Farmers tell us who we are. Something to talk about.

Source:BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/25/07 04:56 PM

Dear DawnEagle,

I do believe you will find the answers you are seeking. Perhaps not all, for do we Ever find ALL answers? Even though the Ancestors urge you to go into a period of Silence, I believe they will be within you to offer help, as well.

I thank you for telling us the meaning of "mitakuye oyasin". I am seeking sayings and words of all the different tribes and this is one that speaks volumes and one I shall keep.

Something I would love to share with all here at the campsite. It is a page that a Spirit Sister made for me. I know you will enjoy it:BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/27/07 10:27 AM

DawnEagle.....you're in my thoughts constantly. Lovingly awaiting your return, as are we all...
Conni
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/27/07 06:43 PM


I just tried the link that I posted here a few days ago and it did not work for me. Strange. But I add it here again and hope that all will be able to view it:

BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/27/07 09:41 PM

kimikaya,
thank you for posting that link again. i tried it before and just assumed i couldn't open it due to something funky gonig on with my computer. Its beautiful!
Tell me...how did it come about?
conni
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/28/07 01:39 PM

That is an awesome site. Thanks for sharing kimikaya.
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/28/07 04:18 PM

Hello everyone,

I thank you for keeping the fires lit in my absence. Your words light up my heart, as the campfire lights up our souls...

It was a long three day fast, with very few answers given, but time put into meditation is always worthwhile. I now know the reason behind a few things that are going on in our world, and have found the direction I need to take for my future lessons to come about. This is all one could ask for.

I am seriously concerned with the state of Mother Earth's health at this time. It seems that earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and floods are all increasing, trying to make us all aware of how much damage we have caused. We can no longer ignore the global warming warnings, for it is upon us already. I'm strange because I feel that instead of fighting for more oil, or destroying more land for it, we should instead find other alternatives, and spend our resources in that direction. It saddens me that we still have coal-fired power plants, as well as nuclear ones, up and running, while they continue to destroy the Earth. Sometimes I think we need to just stop, take a days break, turn everything off, and find a way to start over. This is some of what I was contemplating in the Silence.

From one who has visions of our future possibilities, I am seriously concerned. I'll not share my nightmares, they are mine alone. However, I will say that without major change immediately, we are looking at a very grim future, and a terrible legacy to leave for the 7th Generation.

'Nuff said. Thanks for listening. Moving on now to brighter subjects and happier topics...

I want to thank everyone who has joined us at the campfire, feel free to share anything here that you feel comfortable sharing. We are all here to listen, learn, and to teach.

I have been seeing a lot of critters lately, in unusual circumstances. A dragonfly was trapped in our house the other night, and I went to let it outside before going to bed. It landed on my finger, and didn't want to leave. Yesterday, a hummingbird hovered outside my window, trying to get my attention. My mother I associate with the dragonfly, and my aunt who recently passed, with the hummingbird. I feel these are signs that they are there, watching over me, and sending their love. I think this moon is bringing the Spiritual World closer to ours. Has anyone else had any similar experiences in the last few days? Another odd occurrence was the Buddhist chanting I heard late last night.

Tomorrow, Sunday, is the full Thunder moon, at 8:48pm EDT. The veil between worlds thins, bringing the spiritual world closer to us. Connect with the Ancestors, Elders, or your loved ones on the Other Side during this time, you'll be glad you did! And know that they are always around us, it is us who doesn't notice...

I'll be back soon with another story to share. In the meantime, everyone have a wonderful Saturday!
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/28/07 04:36 PM

DawnEagle....I've so been looking forward to your return. yes, these kinds of things are happening to me, too. My David says that pretty soon Mother will shake herself off, like a dog shaking off fleas....I think he's right. A few months ago, the crows started talking to me. I listened and an important thing happened. Weds night, an Elder that I've just begun spending time with (she is Raven medicine) emailed me to tell me she'll be at Serpent Mound (an earthworks very close to here....there was an enormous crop circle in the field next to it a couple of years ago....) and to meet her there if I cared to. On the way to work the next morning, the crows were back....hundreds of them in farmers fields....flying.....everywhere;so I started paying attention. When I arrived at work and went to my office you'll never guess what I found. One of the ladies at work found a crow's wing pointer feathers by her back door the evening before. They'd been moulted at the same time and dropped where she'd find them. She brought them to me and left a little note. Said she'd always heard it was good luck to find a feather and the first thing she thought of was 'these belong to Conni' so she brought them to me and layed them on my desk to find. I told her she couldn't have given me a more precious gift. I was contemplating not going to the mound tonight, but the feathers validated my need to go. I feel that since both feathers came to me is very significant and the fact that they are both pointers is VERY significant. I understand that crow watches over creation (at least in some traditions). Can you tell me your opinion of this?

I'm so glad you're back. I tried PM'ing you but I couldn't get it to work. How can I contact you privately?

Blessings of peace and love to you and all around this circle
Conni
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/28/07 07:43 PM


yaateeh connidee,

You had asked how the lovely "Lakota" page came to be. It will please me to explain to you and all my friends here around the campfire. And does it not burn brightly with all adding their "sticks" to the fire?

Marlene had a made a beautiful page of "Amazing Grace" being sung in a native tongue. I had complimented her on it and she told me that if I sent her a song, she would make a page for me.
I sent her many songs, saying that "Lakota" was a favorite. And thus the page was born! *grin* Of course, I was thrilled!

And now, I must share with everyone the link for "Amazing Grace" for it is simply beautiful...
BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/30/07 02:56 PM

Hello everyone,

I had problems getting into the forum Saturday night, did anyone else?

Well, I'm here now, let's answer some questions!

Crow, the left-handed guardian, is a master shapeshifter. He is also the holder of the Creator's Divine Laws. Divine Law is different that the law of the land. It is about morals and integrity that we must live up to, in order to be the person we were meant to be in this lifetime. I've always associated Crows with something significant that is about to happen, they will appear to give you a warning to pay attention.

Conni, I hope you went to Serpent Mounds...I think that was your message. I bet it was a magical experience!

Lot's to get accomplished today, so I am going to stop for now, and try to do some work. Such a gorgeous day, it might be difficult! I pray you all a wonderful and blessed day...

DawnEagle

I'll be back this evening with a bedtime story.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/30/07 09:49 PM

DawnEagle,
I went to the mound. My David went, too. The Elder we met there had requested just a few people be present to witness the buryiing of the serpent 'peace' pipe her husband made prior to it's birthing. It will come out of the ground next Saturday and be birthed at that time. Unfortunately, we won't be able to attend as we have a Drumming commitment. I don't know the inspiration of this pipe...only that it is for the People; she said hopefully all over the world...I suspect it will travel...and that it will be used to pray for peace. I need to know more and will email her later this evening. I will describe it to you all after it's birthing next week. It is truly a thing of beauty.

I'm only just learning about crow medicine. Yes, each time they've come to me something HAS happened. The 2 feathers are lying atop my bundle....I'm not sure what to do with them or why I have them.

Thank you for the information; waitin' for the story....got my cocoa mug ready. Will fill it with ice tea...too hot for cocoa. This humidity is a real bummer.

Peace to all,
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/31/07 03:33 AM

I know I'm a little late for a bedtime story in most areas, but it's only 9:30 here... Hope you get to read this one tonight Conni - I know you were waiting on it! Get the cocoa ready, and somebody bring a snack to go with it...heehee! Here's your story, it's a good one, but I gotta warn you, tears may be involved... It's raining here and has been all evening, so cocoa sounds good to me about now...

Black Corn
A Lakota Legend

There once was a woman called Black Corn. She lived in a village surrounded by incredible beauty. There was beauty in the forest, in the plains, in the sky above and the earth below. Black Corn was very tall, taller than all of the other women of her village, indeed, taller than most of the men as well. Strong of limb she was and fair to see. Yet deep within were hidden deeper waters, roiling with discontent and..... Well, no one really knew what else, not even she.

Black Corn was very unhappy, she had so much love to give, yet could not seem to find the one to give it to. All she wanted to do is love someone and have someone love her. She loved her People dearly and did all she could for them, even to the point of sacrificing her own wants to help her People.

Many Gifts she had been given by Wakan Tanka, but could not seem to find them when she needed them the most. She was taunted by many for things she could not understand, she began believing, at first resistantly, then willingly that the lies and the actions were deserved. When she would gaze upon her image in the still waters of the pond, she would think "you are too direct, too tall, too strong, too much... well, too much everything! You have too much passion, too much love, too much... well, too much everything, and no one wants what you have to give!"

Yet the love she held inside for all the People was full to bursting within her breast and all she wanted was someone who would accept her love. All she wanted was for the People to accept her love and what she could give them. Down and down she went with no one to love, no People who wanted her love, or so she thought.

Then, one day, after a particularly difficult incident, she awakened as if from a dream and thought to herself "Why is it this way? What did I do that was so awful that I should be treated in this manner?" Deep inside herself she looked for an answer to these questions. Deeply, beyond all of the hurt, all of the pain that had been put upon her, behind the men who had used her without her consent, and eventually, as her self-respect dwindled, with her consent. So many judgments had been passed on her but none so harsh as what she had passed upon herself.

The deeper she looked, the uglier it became, and the faster the anger rose until it was full-blown rage. White hot the rage burned and coursed through her body. Blindingly it raged, but this too was another illusion. Yes, the rage was a deception, a shield to protect her from what laid beneath.

Finally she could hide no longer behind the rage and the sorrow that she had desperately tried to hide over the years. It came at her like a tidal wave and she stood defenseless in its path. She no longer had the strength to fight; nothing left to stem the flood, so she stood helpless in its path, no shield to protect her any longer.

Out she ran into the forest, hearing the tiny voice inside screaming in agony, dying, dying, dying, screaming NNNNNOOOOOOOOoooooooo... and she just knew that all she had ever thought that she was slowly dying a painful death. Finally, she could help herself no more and cried out in anguish, clutching at the pain in her breast, feeling herself slipping away. She cried out, in full voice, which held all of the pain and agony, begging, at her most pitiful for Wakan Tanka to take her away from this pain.

"Please, please Wakan Tanka, Tunkasila, I can bear this life, this pain, no more, it is too much, Please, please, take me home, please let me have peace!" And when she had finished crying out these words and prayers, and all of the ugliness that was inside her had been given voice, the sound so awful to hear that not even the animals or birds made a sound out of respect for her pain, she lay herself down on the damp sweet smelling forest floor. Her soul ripped open and flayed a bloody mess before her and before the Creator, she finally saw the truth.

It began when she was 7 summers old; she would go into the forest to play. One day a strange man came upon her and began to speak with her. His words were intriguing and he spoke of grown-up things that she liked to hear about. Eventually this stranger seduced her as a child, and as a child, not knowing any better, had allowed it. Many years would pass before Black Corn realized what had been done to her, and when she did realize, she issued a judgment so severe upon herself that she began to believe that she was unworthy of love. She lost all respect for herself and, indeed, this is what she projected unknowingly to everyone she came into contact with. The voices of the others that would taunt her were really reflections of her own voice within that she could not, until now, listen to.

In that moment of her defeat, laying on the forest floor, she began to see with clarity what was that made the People treat her as they were, and with that knowing, she began to cry, great heart wrenching cries that tore at the very fabric of her soul and thus began the cleansing process from within. She found that while she had forgiven that strange man his trespass against her, she had never forgiven herself for her part in it, she had never taken responsibility for it either, preferring to live in a fantasy in her mind that she had been the victim, all the while feeling the guilt of the participant. There had been one other who had used her in this fashion, a relative, who did not know of the first stranger. But by then, the damage to her soul had been done and, while not realizing why it was so, she allowed herself to be degraded even more by this second man.

After that, there was no room for self-respect or self love, feeling as she did that she was unworthy for the things she had done.

After the sobbing had subsided, Black Corn began to feel differently, having accepted everything that was ugly inside of her, she began to heal. Finally, after all of these years. It took a long time, but finally she was able to forgive herself as well as forgive those who took her unfairly and in bad faith, took her innocence and made something ugly out of it, all the while accepting her own responsibility in it as well. Finally she was able to forgive herself. With that forgiving, there was now room for love; all of the love she wanted to give the People was the love that she had been denying herself. Once she could learn to love herself and accept herself, she could also love the People much more than she ever thought possible, and the People rejoiced!

You see, they had always loved Black Corn, but because she did not love herself, she could not see this, she would not ever have seen it if she had not asked herself "why am I being treated this way". The answer was within her all the time.... This was Wakan Tanka's answer to her prayers; this was his gift to her.

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Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/31/07 05:58 PM

Good afternoon!

I hope everyone is having a wonderful day, and Grandfather Sun is shining brightly in your life this day.

I am popping in to tell you about what I have been up to while away from the forum.

I have a climate change blog in Yahoo360, that I have been posting to for about a year and a half now, and it is full of all kinds of climate change info, from links to news articles, from natural disasters and disease to hunger and poverty.

I am telling you about it because I have made my last blog post there today, and I want to tell you about the last post. It is called "Stop the World". This is an idea given to me in prayer by the Creator, a plan to Stop the World so that we can realize those things that are not needed in our lives, in order to create a better, more harmonious world, and live more in tune with the natural world. It is an effort to create awareness of climate change, and of our excesses.

To read more about this plan, please go check out the blog at:
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Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/31/07 09:26 PM

DawnEagle,
I read your blog...now if I can figure out how to send it to all in my email address book, I will send it to everyone I know. My David can help....he's one of those 'puter geeks.

I will try with everything I have to follow the example you've set in your blog. I promise, I will try.

Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 07/31/07 10:06 PM

Conni,

You are an angel, and your support with this is greatly appreciated. Anything you can do is wonderful. Thank you smile

btw, I posted a story for you, hope you didn't miss it above. It's called "Black Corn". Enjoy!

Many Hugs,
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/01/07 05:31 PM

I, too, will do all that I can and shall pass the word to all that I know about your "Stop the World", DawnEagle. An idea who's time has come.....

I am pretty sure it was you who mentioned the book "NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG, ON FORGOTTEN ROADS WITH AN INDIAN ELDER", DawnEagle. I have read about half of it. What an Outstanding book! I only wish that all, all wasichu, would be "required" to read this. And oh! how I have cried! But I have laughed, as well. In fact, there are many emotions I have felt.

A line that I shall Never forget: "you have killed us without even taking our lives". Dan is an exceptional man. What a joy to hear his words.

I also have "THE WISDOM OF THE NATIVE AMERICANS" written by Kent Nerburn, as well. I do look forward to reading his other books.

pila mita, DawnEagle.
kimikaya
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/01/07 09:16 PM

Kimikaya,
I read Neither Wolf Nor Dog a good while ago. It is wonderful and I recommend it to all. You're right....EVERYONE need to read it. Maybe some understanding would start to take place.... maybe. I work at a place where people can be pretty hurtful if you're not just like them....but on the same token I work with some pretty wonderful people, too. I reckon it all balancees out like its supposed to, huh?
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/02/07 11:22 PM

O'siyo to all!

Connie was the one who mentioned the book. I have not read it, and need to look for it smile

Today I come bringing a prayer, just because I feel like it is needed at this time.

Laws of The Great Spirit

Treat the Earth and all that dwell thereon with respect.
Remain close to the Great Spirit.
Show great respect for your fellow beings.
Work together for the benefit of all Mankind.
Give assistance and kindness wherever needed.

Do what you know to be right.
Look after the well being of mind and body.
Dedicate a share of your efforts to the greater good.
Be truthful and honest at all times.
Take full responsibility for your actions.

Great Spirit,
give us hearts to understand;
never to take from creation's beauty more than we give;
never to destroy wantonly for the furtherance of greed;
never to deny to give our hands for the building of earth's beauty;
never to take from her what we cannot use.

Give us hearts to understand
that to destroy earth's music is to create confusion;
that to wreck her appearance is to blind us to beauty;
that to callously pollute her fragrance is to make a house of stench;
that as we care for her she will care for us.

We have forgotten who we are.
We have sought only our own security.
We have exploited simply for our own ends.
We have distorted our knowledge.
We have abused our power.

Great Spirit, whose dry lands thirst,
help us to find the way to refresh your lands.

Great Spirit, whose waters are choked with debris and pollution,
help us to find the way to cleanse your waters.

Great Spirit, whose beautiful earth grows ugly with misuse,
help us to find the way to restore beauty to your handiwork.

Great Spirit, whose creatures are being destroyed,
help us to find a way to replenish them.

Great Spirit, whose gifts to us are being lost in selfishness and
corruption, help us to find the way to restore our humanity.

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Posted By: I Don't Play With Trolls

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/04/07 02:23 AM

Heya all..
Life brought me some challenging adventures which kept me off the computer. I think I can again devote some time to visiting here and sharing. Hope all are well and life is unfolding in interesting ways.
Are you still around Jase?
As an aside, I would recommend God Is Red by Vine Deloria Jr. Should be mandatory reading in school, in my opinion smile
Rueben
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/04/07 05:19 PM

Conni, then it is you I must thank for the recommdation of that Awesome book. Please accept my deepest thanks.

A beautiful and very meaningful prayer, DawnEagle. One I shall save. Thank you.

To lighten things up a bit, I would like to offer a sweet little poem.

The Legend of Pussy Willows

An Indian legend tells the tale
Of tiny kittens, oh, so frail.

Along the river's edge they chased,
With butterflies, they played and raced.

They came too close to the river's side
And, thus, fell in. Their mother cried.

What could she do but weep and moan?
Her babies' fate were yet unknown.

The willows, by the river, knew
Just what it was that they must do.

They swept their graceful branches down
Into the waters, all around.

To reach the kittens was their goal;
A rescue mission, heart and soul.

The kittens grasped the branches tight,
The willows saved them from their plight.

Each Springtime since, the story goes,
Willow branches now wear clothes.

Tiny fur like buds are sprung
Where little kittens once had clung.

And that's the legend, so they claim,
How Pussy Willows got their name!
-author unknown

I so love the gathering of dear friends here at the campfire. May we all keep it burning with our "sticks" of stories, prayers and such.

Walk in Peace and Love,
kimikaya
Posted By: I Don't Play With Trolls

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/04/07 06:56 PM

That is an interesting story! Sometimes we are imparted with the gift of knowledge, and sometimes a more direct and tangible gift is bestowed on us.
I have to admit that dreamcatchers used in any form other than their true purpose, and in any form other than made correctly, kind of make me a tad uncomfortable. I am from a very very very very traditional tribal upbringing.
Dreamcatchers hanging on rearview mirrors in particular bug me. Some other ndn friends and I were conspiring to leave notes on these car windshields saying " Ndn's don't let friends drive asleep."
I know it is a readily identifiable ndn object, but it has a place and a power, and I am not sure I have ever been comfortable seeing it miniaturized and used decoratively.
I still think your gift is cool and the connection between what happened and the finding of it could certainly have a meaning that should be cherished.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/05/07 02:22 PM

Originally Posted By: NdnRu
I have to admit that dreamcatchers used in any form other than their true purpose, and in any form other than made correctly, kind of make me a tad uncomfortable. I am from a very very very very traditional tribal upbringing.
Dreamcatchers hanging on rearview mirrors in particular bug me. Some other ndn friends and I were conspiring to leave notes on these car windshields saying " Ndn's don't let friends drive asleep."
I know it is a readily identifiable ndn object, but it has a place and a power, and I am not sure I have ever been comfortable seeing it miniaturized and used decoratively.


I feel the same way about crosses as you do about dream catchers. The cross has a very deep meaning to me and I don't like seeing it used carelessly or for decorations as well.

I have seen them in homes as decorations and they have more than one because "they look cool."

Some have them as "good luck charms" and if these people are Christians then they should know that aa good luck charm is superstitious and superstition is from the rooted spirit of fear.

To me the cross represents our salvation through Christ and should not be used as decorations or as charms.

However, that is only my opinion and I apologize for being off topic as well.
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/05/07 06:27 PM

It is the same for the star of david. However, I also look at the symbology of it. True, it is a representation of a faith. True, it is also a symbol used in religious rituals. However, we must remember that it is only a symbol. We mustn't hold too much onto a symbol and forget that it has a meaning and a power. This meaning and power could be to teach someone else... to affect them and have an effect on them. So when I see soemone with a religious symbol, I sometimes will ask them what it means to them. We have to remember, that a symbol may mean one thing to one person, but completely something else to someone else. And by exploring that persons relationship with that symbol we can learn a lot and also teach a lot.

Just my 2 cents ;0)
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/05/07 06:27 PM

Oh, and Hey Ru! Yep, I am still here. As long as the circle is open, here I shall remain.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/06/07 12:02 PM

And a good mornin' to all my campfire friends!

I agree....none of us appreciate objects that represent our spiritual beliefs to be exploited, disrespected.....maybe the wrong words, but you all know what I mean, I'm sure. I think that many people are guilty ignorance rather than malice. I prefer to believe that, anyway. Folks who are not familiar with other peoples cultures and traditions don't realize the sacredness of some of the things they casually display as "good luck charms", etc. Best thing to do in my opinion? With respect and in a gentle way educate people....I don't mean lecture.....but educate. Education lends to understanding and understanding lends to acceptance and acceptance lends to respect. Respecting one anothers ways lends to peace. And maybe one day we will all.....ALL of us love one another. I know to some it sounds contrite and corny, but that is my belief.

Kimikaya....it is my pleasure that you've enjoyed the book so much. You've inspired me to read it again.

As for finding the dreamcatcher.....good or bad? I think that is for the individual to decide. I don't think there are coincidences....all things happen when they are supposed to and for a reason. It may be years before we know the answers....maybe never will. Obsidiana, you did a good thing by helping your teacher....but the most important thing (in my opinion) is your reaction to the broken plant. You offered apologies and respect to the plant people by offering prayer and tobacco. The plant reacted to that respect and caring.

I spent the weekend in Bellfontaine, Ohio at the Shawnee Powwow. Pretty incredible weekend. I'll share that story later. I have a jeep to unpack and a faithful friend to pick up from the kennel (the bed and biscuit). It's going to be mid 90's here today so I need to get started early before it becomes too unbearable to move. No AC here.

With all that said......I'll pass the talking stick to the next and wish you all a beautiful, blessing filled day.
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/09/07 03:37 PM

I'm so glad to see people here joining in conversation, spreading the warmth of the campfire! Thanks for the energy!

I'm posting one last book review as my article for this week, it's called "Avenging Victorio", and you can catch it on the Native American home page here in just a few minutes. A couple of days ago I posted a review of "Saints of the Pueblos", an excellent book. Check it out on the home page also.

I'm getting ready to go to the Navajo Intertribal Ceremonial this weekend, and next week I'll be talking about that in my weekly article. I'm really looking forward to this one, it's my favorite! Then I'll ride on up to CrownPoint and get me some fresh mutton before coming back to Albuquerque. Yum!

The following weekend will be Indian Market in Santa Fe, where all the guest authors I've been doing review on will be doing book signings. I'm really looking forward to meeting them, and seeing the wonderful artwork at Indian Market. Can't wait!

That just about catches us up on my news for the week. What's going on in your world?

Tried to get over here yesterday and post the following Declaration, but was unable to get into the forum all day. Here it is now, enjoy!

DECLARATION OF THE FOUR SACRED THINGS

"The Earth is a living, conscious being. In company with cultures of many different times and places, we name these things as sacred:
Air, Fire, Water, and Earth.
Whether we see them as the breath, energy, blood, and body of the Mother, or as the blessed gifts of a Creator, or as symbols of the interconnected systems that sustain life, we know that nothing can live without them.
To call these things sacred is to say that they have a value
beyond their usefulness for human ends, that they themselves become the standards by which our acts, our economics, our laws, and our purposes must be judged. No one has the right to appropriate them or profit from them at the expense of others. Any government that fails to protect them forfeits its legitimacy.
All people, all living things, are part of the earth life, and so
are sacred. No one of us stands higher or lower than any other. Only justice can assure balance: only ecological balance can sustain freedom. Only in freedom can that fifth sacred thing we call spirit flourish in its full diversity.
To honor the sacred is to create conditions in which nourishment,
sustenance, habitat, knowledge, freedom, and beauty can thrive. To honor the sacred is to make love possible.
To this we dedicate our curiosity, our will, our courage, our
silences, and our voices. To this we dedicate our lives.

StarHawk
"The Fifth Sacred Thing"
copyright 1993, Bantam Books, NY

And in case I don't make it back before the weekend, I want to wish everyone a great weekend, full of sunshine and laughter!
Walk in Beauty,
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/10/07 09:15 PM

yaateeh le mita cola,

I am stopping by just to add "sticks" to the campfire. For I do hope that it continues to burn brightly. I have met people here whom I have come to love, and do wish that they will continue to add their "sticks".

I have no story, but I do come bearing marshmellows!! *grin* We just need someone to find little branches for us.

DawnEagle, the "Declaration" was wonderful. It sounds as if you will have a very wonderful and fun weekend and for weekends to come. Do wish that I lived closer.

I am trying to find a powwow or something of that type near me. I really don't know where to begin, except to "google". Perhaps some around the campfire can help me out. I am in Central Florida. Does anyone have any ideas?

To all around the campfire I offer:
wakan tanan kici un (May the Great Spirit Bless You)
kimikaya
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/10/07 09:33 PM

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Posted By: babyquacker

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/11/07 01:14 AM

kimikaya, there is a pow-wow in Washington, D.C. this weekend and August 23-25, there is another one Baltimore, Maryland. I used yahoo and looked up "maryland pow-wows". There were all kinds of sites, with lots of varying info, but after awhile, I came across the info I wanted, which were dates and places. smile

You should be able to do the same with Florida. Good Luck! It seems that this is the time of year when there are alot of "campfire meetings". Our first day in Baltimore is mainly instructional, with Saturday and Sunday holding ALL the cool stuff. laugh

Best Wishes and HAPPY HUNTING!

Trish
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/11/07 03:17 AM

Ya ta hey

I wanted to stop in and wish everyone a great evening, and an even better weekend! If you get to looking for me, I'll be the one by the fire burning my marshmallows... and looking for graham crackers cuz I come bringing chocolate. Add another log to the campfire, and let's get comfortable. I'm gonna tell you a story.

First though, let me say that we have a links section on the Native American home page (click on the BellaOnline logo above - top left, then Society & Culture then Native American), and you'll find pow wow links there too. I try to keep it up to date, so if you have some to add, send them on, and I'll put them in for us.

Ok, story time! I feel like a Dine story tonight...

The Navajo Creation Story

The Navajo creation story involves three underworlds where important events happened to shape the Fourth World where we now live.

The Navajo were given the name Ni�hookaa Diyan Din� by their creators. It means "Holy Earth People" or "Lords of the Earth". Navajos today simply call themselves "Din�", meaning "The People". The Tewa Indians were the first to call them "Navahu", which means "the large area of cultivated land". The Mexicans knew them as "Apaches Du Nabahu" (Apaches of the Cultivated Fields), where "Apache" (Enemy) was picked up from the Zuni Indian language. The "Apaches Du Nabahu" were known as a special group somewhat distinct from the rest of the Apaches. Alonso de Benavides changed the name to "Navaho" in a book written in 1630. The English name the Din� officially use for themselves is "Navajo". Recently, Navajos have been referring to call themselves by their original name, "Din�".

According to the Din�, they emerged from three previous underworlds into this, the fourth, or "Glittering World", through a magic reed. The first people from the other three worlds were not like the people of today. They were animals, insects or masked spirits as depicted in Navajo ceremonies. First Man ('Alts� Hastiin), and First Woman ('Alts� 'Asdz��), were two of the beings from the First or Black World. First Man was made in the east from the meeting of the white and black clouds. First Woman was made in the west from the joining of the yellow and blue clouds. Spider Woman (Na ashje�ii 'Asdz��), who taught Navajo women how to weave, was also from the first world.

Once in the Glittering World, the first thing the people did was build a sweat house and sing the Blessing Song. Then they met in the first house (hogan) made exactly as Talking God (Haashch�eelti�i) had prescribed. In this hogan, the people began to arrange their world, naming the four sacred mountains surrounding the land and designating the four sacred stones that would become the boundaries of their homeland. In actuality, these mountains do not contain the symbolic sacred stones. The San Francisco Peaks (Dook�o�osl��d), represents the Abalone and Coral stones. It is located just north of Flagstaff, and is the Navajo�s religious western boundary. Mt. Blanco (Tsisnaasjini'), in Colorado, represents the White Shell stone, and represents the Navajo�s religious eastern boundary. Mt. Taylor (Tsoodzil), east of Grants, New Mexico, represents the Turquoise stone, and represents the Navajo�s religious southern boundary. Mt. Hesperus (Dib� Nitsaa), in Colorado, represents the Black Jet stone, and represents the Navajo�s religious northern boundary. Pictures of these sacred mountains can be found by clicking here.

After setting the mountains down where they should go, the Navajo deities, or "Holy People", put the sun and the moon into the sky and were in the process of carefully placing the stars in an orderly way. But the Coyote, known as the trickster, grew impatient from the long deliberations being held, and seized the corner of the blanket where it lay and flung the remaining stars into the sky.

The Holy People continued to make the necessities of life, like clouds, trees and rain. Everything was as it should be when the evil monsters appeared and began to kill the new Earth People. But a miracle happened to save them, by the birth of Ever Changing Woman (Asdzaa Nadleehe) at Gobernador Knob (Ch��ol���), New Mexico.

Changing Woman grew up around El Huerfano Mesa (Dzil Na�oodilii), in northern New Mexico. She married the Sun and bore two son, twins, and heroes to the Navajo people. They were known as "Monster Slayer" and "Child-Born-of-Water". The twins traveled to their father the Sun who gave them weapons of lighting bolts to fight the dreaded monsters. Every place the Hero Twins killed a monster it turned to stone. An example of this is the lave flows near Mt. Taylor in New Mexico, believed to be the blood from the death of Ye�iitsoh, or the "Monster who Sucked in People". All of the angular rock formations on the reservation, such as the immense Black Mesa (Dzil Y�jiin), are seen as the turned-to-stone bodies of the monsters.

With all of the monsters dead, the Navajo deities, or "Holy People", turned their attention to the making of the four original clans. Kiiyaa aanii, or Tall House People, was the first clan. They were made of yellow and white corn. Eventually other clans traveled to the area round the San Juan River, bring their important contributions to the tribe. Some were Paiutes who brought their beautiful baskets. Others were Pueblos who shared their farming and weaving skills. Still others were Utes and Apaches.

For her husband, the "Sun", to visit her every evening, Changing Woman went to live in the western sea on an island made of rock crystal. Her home was made of the four sacred stones: Abalone, White Shell, Turquoise, and Black Jet. During the day she became lonely and decided to make her own people. She made four clans from the flakes of her skin. These were known as the Near Water People, Mud People, Salt Water People, and Bitter Water People. When these newly formed clans heard that there were humans to the east who shared their heritage, they wanted to go meet them.

Changing Woman gave her permission for them to travel from the western sea to the San Francisco Peaks. They then traveled through the Hopi mesas where they left porcupine, still commonly found there today. Then they traveled toward the Chuska Mountains and on to Mt. Taylor. Finally, the people arrived at Dinetah, the Din� traditional homeland, and joined the other clans already living there. Dinetah is located in the many canyons that drain the San Juan River about 30 miles east of Farmington, New Mexico.

Source: www.lapahie.com
a great site for Navajo info, including pics of some of the locations mentioned in this story.

Walk in Beauty,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/19/07 12:29 AM

Hello out there!
Is anybody listening? Just nod if you can hear me...
heehee, a little Pink Floyd to get your weekend rolling.

I just got back from Indian Market in Santa Fe, and am about to write up an article on it for this week's column. We stayed until the rain hit, and it was HOT up there! Usually it is cooler in Santa Fe than it is in Albuquerque, but no such luck today!

I am just stopping in to say hello to you all, and wish you a wonderful weekend. I'll be back with a story later on.

Oh! And upgrades have been done on the forum, which should help it to not crash so often anymore. Woo hoo!

Walk in Beauty,
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/19/07 11:24 AM

I just want to say hello
I have been interested Native American culture a very long time.
I am very interested all storys, clothes, jewerlys and dancing.
I have been seen one time powwows and it looks very beutiful dance!
I live here in East Finland so I have not possibility to
see or learn more.
Now I just read all your writing here.
Thank you for all of you

Katja
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/19/07 08:57 PM

Hello Katja,
Welcome to the Native American forum! We are honored to have you amongst us, and glad you are warming yourself at our campfire. The stories will continue later today, and many are here to share. Feel free to ask questions, or add comments of your own. We are all here to learn, and to grow smile

Kimikaya, I just replied to you about your forum problems, and came over here to find that I was able to get in and post. Hopefully, you can now do the same, and you will find this message telling you to try it out. There is a link on the main forum page to click if you have problems. Go to BellaOnline, click on forums, and it's the page that gives you the forum list, it's on the top right hand side. Let me know if you still experience problems, and I'll follow up on you again later on.

Everyone have a great Sunday afternoon. I'll be back later with a story.
Many Blessings,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/20/07 03:49 PM

Good Morning and Happy Monday to all!

Stopping by to let you know that I am going to be out of town the rest of the week. I am going to do some camping in southern New Mexico, in the Gila Wilderness. I will return sometime between Friday and Sunday.

This week's article is on the Santa Fe Indian Market, and will go live at noon (Bella time) on Thursday. It can be accessed on the Native American home page. I hope you enjoy it!

I tried to get back in here to leave you a story last night, and the forum was down. I think it is fixed now, I have received word that it is all in working order, and should stay up and running all the time. If you do experience any problems, go to the main forum page, and on the top right, you will see a link to click, to contact someone about it.

Ok, here's your story. I pray you a wonderful week!

Butterflies

Papago

One day the Creator was resting, sitting, watching some children at play in a village. The children laughed and sang, yet as he watched them, the Creator's heart was sad.
He was thinking:
"These children will grow old. Their skin will become wrinkled. Their hair will turn gray. Their teeth will fall out. The young hunter's arm will fail. These lovely young girls will grow ugly and fat. The playful puppies will become blind, mangy dogs. And those wonderful flowers - yellow and blue, red and purple - will fade. The leaves from the trees will fall and dry up. Already they are turning yellow."

Thus the Creator grew sadder and sadder. It was in the fall, and the thought of the coming winter, with its cold and lack of game and green things, made his heart heavy.

Yet it was still warm, and the sun was shining. The Creator watched the play of sunlight and shadow on the ground, the yellow leaves being carried here and there by the wind. He saw the blueness of the sky, the whiteness of some cornmeal ground by the women. Suddenly he smiled.
"All those colors, they ought to be preserved. I'll make something to gladden my heart, something for these children to look at and enjoy."

The Creator took out his bag and started gathering things: a spot of sunlight, a handful of blue from the sky, the whiteness of the cornmeal, the shadow of playing children, the blackness of a beautiful girl's hair, the yellow of the falling leaves, the green of the pine needles, the red, purple, and orange of the flowers around him. All these he put into his bag.
As an afterthought, he put the songs of the birds in, too.

Then he walked over to the grassy spot where the children were playing.
"Children, little children, this is for you," and he gave them his bag. "Open it; there's something nice inside," he told them.

The children opened the bag, and at once hundreds and hundreds of colored butterflies flew out, dancing around the children's heads, settling on their hair, fluttering up again to sip from this or that flower. And the children, enchanted, said that they had never seen anything so beautiful.

The butterflies began to sing, and the children listened smiling.

But then a songbird came flying, settling on the Creator's shoulder, scolding him, saying:
"It's not right to give our songs to these new, pretty things. You told us when you made us that every bird would have his own song. And now you've passed them all around. Isn't it enough that you gave your new playthings the colors of the rainbow?"
"You're right," said the Creator. "I made one song for each bird, and I shouldn't have taken what belongs to you."

So the Creator took the songs away from the butterflies, and that's why they are silent.
"They're beautiful even so!" he said.

- Retold from various sources.
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Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/21/07 10:12 PM

KatjaP,
Welcome to you. There is a Native American Elder who travels all over the world to spread the teachings. His name is Rainbow Eagle and I know he has been to Finland.
Look at his website.
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Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/22/07 08:17 AM

Ok I check that dancing what I saw and it was not powwow.
It was hoop dance(?) and dancer was Holy Eagle and year was 1998.
I hope that I can see someday powwow also.
I think that I have some stupid guestions, but I have to ask later. Now I have to go.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/22/07 07:42 PM

I bid you Welcome to our campfire as well, Katja!

A learned Elder was known to state that there are NO "stupid questions". For how else are we to learn? A question that burns within us must surely have water splashed upon it, eh? *grin*

For at least two weeks I have had many problems with this site.
Some of my own silly doings, others not. But now that I am here, I do want to add much wood to our fire because it looked to be burning much too dimly. It would sadden me deeply to see it go out completely!

I went to DawnEagle asking for help and, with a grin on my face, told her that she had "stole" the exact story that I was most anxious to post.....for I raise butterflies! Monarchs mostly, but others as well.

This has been a poor year for butterflies for me. For I have yet to see the first one in my yard. I worry about this and yet have no explanation. Last year my "babies" numbered well over a hundred. And yet, I shall never tire of experiencing the miracle of a lowly chrysalis becoming a beautiful creature of the Great Spirit's doing.

I find that I am out of time here, so I would pass the "talking stick" onto others. Let us keep the fire burning bright, dear friends.

ka dish day.
nayeli,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/22/07 09:29 PM

Hello to all my campfire friends. I've been having problems with the site, too. The upgrades have made a big difference. Thank you to whomever is responsible for that.

Oh Kimikaya! You raise butterflies? My grandaughter's name is Camama Usti...little butterfly. How do you raise butterflies? Do you have butterfly boxes? I notices there havent been so many this year, too and I think it might be for the same reason that the honey bees are disappearing. Radio or microwaves. I don't know which the cell phones use, but its messing with the poor creatures' ability to navigate. It's been really hot here; drought like conditions so there havent been many flowers here for the butterflies.

How do we fix our dear Mother? When I see beauty dying like the bees and butterflies my heart breaks. The other day I had gone to the grocery and when I went in I noticed a perfect (black swallow tail, maybe?) butterfly holding onto the base of some patio furniture. It was a miserably hot day....no water or flowers anywhere....nowhere for it to go but into the parking lot. I decided that if it was still there when I came out of the store, I would gather it up (people around here think I'm totally looney....I don't care) and take it back to work with me. There are fields all around and I figured it would be more comfortable there. It was still there when I came out...so I gathered it up and took it with me. When I got to work I moistened some paper towels, thinking it might drink from it and I placed that onthe ground next to the only flower I could find. There were 2 big purple clover flowers in the field, so I placed my beautiful butterfly on one of them. she clung to it and I didn't know what to do next. she didn't seem interested in eating. I watched for a while, but had to go back to work. She was perfect. Wings werent tattered....she just didn't seem to have any energy. Hope I did the right thing. I figured she would know I tried to help her.

Do you have butterfly flower gardens? What do you plant?

Must take care of my evening responsibilities,
blessings to all
Conni






Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/22/07 09:32 PM

KatjaP,
Kimikaya is right....there are no stupid questions. Don't be afraid to ask....nobody here will make fun of you. We'll do as best we can to answer. DawnEagle is a walking encyclopedia. Very wise woman.
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/26/07 06:17 PM

You are much too kind, Conni. I can only share what I have been taught, and give thanks to all my teachers, even those amongst us here...hint hint! heehee!

Much love to all. I have returned from my sojourn in the Gila National Forest, where I saw quite a few Monarchs, and have gained new inspiration for us all. There are places in this world still, where nature reigns. This is a true sign of hope for us all.

I will tell you more about my trip a little later on. Right now, I have some pressing business about the Cheyenne Elders in Oklahoma, and am posting it in a new thread. I hope you'll check it out.

As to the forum, I am told it has all been fixed, and I, too, am very grateful. Still, if anyone has problems, never hesitate to contact me.

My next scheduled trip will be a day trip over Labor Day weekend to Santa Domingo Pueblo for the Arts and Crafts fair, so I will not be away for long.

Keep the campfire burning brightly, and welcome to all who join us here. I will be back as soon as I can, to tell you more about my venture into the wilderness.

Much love and many hugs to all,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/27/07 08:51 PM

I am in the mood for a story today, even though it is a little early yet for bedtime stories, I need it today! I just came across this one, and surprisingly, it is Cheyenne, and a very powerful tale. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Arrow Boy

Cheyenne

Arrow Boy, the wonderful boy, gives a magic performance still enacted during Sioux Yuwipi ceremonies, in which the medicine man is tied up with a rawhide thong and covered with a star blanket (formerly a buffalo robe) while eerie lights flicker and invisible rattles and strange voices are heard.
The pottery-making Pueblos have another version of this tale that they call the legend of the Water- Olla Boy.

****

After the Cheyenne had received their corn, and while they were still in the north, a young man and woman of the tribe were married.
The woman became pregnant and carried her child in the womb for four years. The people watched with great interest to see what would happen, and when the woman gave birth to a beautiful boy in the fourth year, they regarded him as supernatural. Before long the woman and her husband died, and the boy was taken in by his grandmother, who lived alone.

He learned to walk and talk very quickly. He was given a buffalo calf robe and immediately turned it inside out so that the hair side was outward, the way medicine men wore it.
Among the Cheyenne there were certain medicine men of extraordinary wisdom and supernatural powers. Sometimes they would come together and put up a lodge. Sitting in a large circle, they chanted and went through curious rituals, after which each man rose and performed wonders before the crowd.

One of these magic dances were held when the boy was about ten. He made his grandmother ask if he could take part, and the medicine men let him enter the lodge.
"Where do you want to live?" the chief of the medicine men asked, meaning "Where do you want to sit?"

Without ceremony the boy took his seat beside the chief. To the man who had ushered him in, the child gave directions to paint his body red and draw black rings around his face, wrists, and ankles.
The performance began at one end of the circle. When the boy's turn came, he told the people what he was going to do. He used sweet grass to burn incense. Then he passed his buffalo sinew bowstring east, south, west, and north through the smoke. He asked two men to assist him and told them to tie his bowstring around his neck, cover his body with his robe, and pull at the ends of the string.

They pulled with all their might, but they could not move him. He told them to pull harder, and as they tugged at the string, his head was severed. It rolled out from under the robe, and the men put it back.
Next the men lifted the robe up. Instead of the boy, a very old man was sitting in his place.
They covered the old man with the robe and pulled it away again, this time revealing a pile of human bones with a skull.
A third time they placed the robe over the bones and lifted it. Nothing at all was there.
But when for a fourth time they spread the robe over the empty space and removed it, the wonderful boy sat in his place as if nothing had happened.

After the magic dance, the Cheyenne moved their camp to hunt buffalo. When a kill had been made, the wonderful boy led a crowd of boys who went hunting for calves that might return to the place where they last saw their mothers. The boys found five or six calves, surrounded them, and killed a two-year-old with their arrows.
They began to skin it very carefully with bone knives, keeping the hide of the head intact and leaving the hooves on, because the wonderful boy wanted the skin for a robe.

While they worked, a man driving a dog team approached them. It was Young Wolf, head chief of the tribe, who had come to the killing ground to gather what bones had been left.
He said,
"My children have favored me at last! I'll take charge of this buffalo; you boys go on off."

The children obeyed, except for the wonderful boy, who kept skinning as he explained that he wanted only the hide for a robe. The chief pushed the wonderful boy aside, but the boy returned and resumed skinning.
Then the chief jerked the boy away and threw him down. The boy got up and continued his work. Pretending that he was skinning one of the hind legs, he cut the leg off at the knee and left the hoof on.

When the chief shouldered the boy out of the way and took over the work, the wonderful boy struck him on the back of the head with the buffalo leg.
The chief fell dead.
The boys ran to the camp and told the story, which caused great excitement. The warriors assembled and decided to kill the wonderful boy.

They went out to look for him near the body of their chief, but the boy had returned to camp. He was sitting in his grandmother's lodge while she cooked food for him in an earthen pot, when suddenly the whole tipi was raised by the warriors.
Quickly the wonderful boy kicked the pot over, sending the contents into the fire. As the smoke billowed up, the boy rose with it. The old woman was left sitting alone.
The warriors looked around and saw the boy about a quarter of a mile away, walking off toward the east. They ran after him but could not seem to draw closer. Four times they chased him with no success, and then gave up.

People became afraid of the wonderful boy. Still, they looked for him everyday and at last saw him on top of a nearby hill. The whole camp gathered to watch as he appeared on the summit five times, each time in a different dress.
First he came as a Red Shield warrior in a headdress made out of buffalo skin. He had horns, a spear, a red shield. and two buffalo tails tied to each arm.
The second time he was a Coyote warrior, with his body painted black and yellow and with two eagle feathers sticking up on his head.
The third time he appeared as a Dog Men warrior wearing a feathered headdress and carrying an eagle-bone whistle, a rattle of buffalo hoof, and a bow and arrows.
The fourth time he was a Hoof Rattle warrior. His body was painted, and he had a rattle to sing by and a spear about eight feet long, with a crook at one end and the shaft at the other end bent in a semicircle.
The fifth time his body was painted white, and on his forehead he wore a white owl skin.

After this the wonderful boy disappeared entirely. No one knew where he went, people thought him dead, and he was soon forgotten, for the buffalo disappeared and famine came to the Cheyenne.
During this time the wonderful boy traveled alone into the highest ranges of the mountains. As he drew near a certain peak, a door opened in the mountain slope.

(read "The Gold Of The Gods" by Erich Von Daniken, - such door actually exists! - Even though Von Daniken talks a lot of [censored] desperately trying to prove that "aliens" exist, nevertheless - his archeological discoveries are still rocking the many foundations of what we have held to be "world history", and completely tears it to pieces,..
but you have to be strong minded enough to ignore his mad ramblings and read on!
Might this also be the reference made by the Sioux as to where the buffalo disappeared when they "went inside a mountain"?
Note that almost ALL tribes have legends of a mountain or mountains with a "door" in it - that leads to other places. It, and some of the connecting tunnels - some of which are literally HUNDREDS of miles long, extend underground to various places all over South America, and may also be the place to which Moctezuma alluded, when he told his people to take the remaining gold to other lands by going "inside the mountains", after the Spanish broke their promises, and then later killed him,...
they never did solve the mystery though, of where such enormously huge quantities of gold disappeared to in such a short time!!!).

He passed through into the earth, and the opening closed after him. There inside the mountain he found a large circle of men. Each represented a tribe and was seated beneath that tribe's bundle.

They welcomed the wonderful boy and pointed out the one empty place under a bundle wrapped in fox skin.
"If you take this seat, the bundle will be yours to carry back to the Cheyenne," the head man said. "But first you will remain here four years, receiving instruction in order to become your tribe's prophet and counselor."
The wonderful boy accepted the bundle, and all the men gave thanks.
When his turn came to perform the bundle ceremony, they took it down and showed him its sacred ceremonies, songs, and four medicine arrows, each representing certain powers.

Then for four years under the mountain peak, they taught him prophecies, magic, and ceremonies for warfare and hunting.
Meanwhile the Cheyenne were weak with hunger, threatened by starvation. All the animals had died, and the people ate herbs.

One day as the tribe was traveling in search of food, five children lagged behind to look for herbs and mushrooms.
Suddenly the wonderful boy, now a young man bearing the name of Arrow Boy, appeared before them.
"My poor children, throw away those mushrooms," he said. "It is I who brought famine among you, for I was angry with your people when they drove me from their camp. I have returned to provide for you; you shall not hunger in the future. Go and gather some dried buffalo bones, and I will feed you."

The children ran away and picked up buffalo bones, and the wonderful boy, Arrow Boy, made a few passes that turned them into fresh meat. He fed the children with fat, marrow, liver, and other strengthening parts of the buffalo. When they had eaten all they wanted, he gave them fat and meat.

"Take this to your people," he said. "Tell them that I, Motzeyouf, Arrow Boy, have returned."
Though the boys ran to the camp, Motzeyouf used magic to reach it first. He entered the lodge of his uncle and lay down to rest, for he was tired. The uncle and his wife were sitting just outside, but they did not see Arrow Boy pass by.
The boys arrived in camp with their tale, which created great excitement. The uncle's wife went into the lodge to get a pipe, and it was then that she saw Arrow Boy lying covered with a buffalo robe. The robe, and his shirt, leggings, and his moccasins, all were painted red. Guessing that he was Motzeyouf, the men went into the lodge, asked the stranger to sit up, and cried over him.

They saw his bundle, and knowing that he had power, they asked him what they should do. Motzeyouf told the Cheyenne to camp in a circle and set up a large tipi in the center.
When this had been done, he called all the medicine men to bring their rattles and pipes. Then he went into the tipi and sang the sacred songs that he had learned. It was night before he came to the song about the fourth arrow.

In the darkness the buffalo returned with a roar like thunder. The frightened Cheyenne went in to Arrow Boy and asked him what to do.
"Go and sleep," he said, "for the buffalo, your food, has returned to you."
The roar of the buffalo continued through the night as long as he sang. The next morning the land was covered with buffalo, and the people went out and killed all they wanted. From that time forth, owing to the medicine arrows, the Cheyenne had plenty to eat and great powers.

- Retold from a tale reported by George A. Dorsey in 1905.

*****

Note:
The medicine arrows brought down from the mountains by Motzeyouf still exist and are cared for by the Arrow Keeper of the Southern Cheyenne in Oklahoma.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/28/07 02:08 PM

Good Morning le mita cola,

What a great story, DawnEagle! I was so surprised to learn that the arrows do, in fact, exist. Thank you for sharing.

I would like to add a little something here today. It's a poem that I recently came across and enjoyed. It is written by Rex A. Begaye who is a wonderful Native American artist.

WITH MY EYES CLOSE

An afternoon on a late summer's day,
High above the trees,
I can see a distant away.
Silently listening to whispering breeze.
Watching varied colors vanishing into the sunset.
Feeling the sensation of thoughts,
Nevertheless, on a dream that is predetermined.
Prior to,
Undeveloped adventures accrues,
Challenged with fascination of what is unperceived.
Irresistible powers have forcefully invaded,
Achieving to accomplish life in its realism.
Slowly, I have chosen to close my eyes
And emphasized what was moral and immoral.
Enthusiastically with desire, I was awakened.
A thrusting vision,
Tunneling through my mind.
Dysfunctional, impaired of time,
Was interfered in a split second.
I was deceived of a mysterious enchantment.
Focusing to proceed without being irrational,
I have motivated and reflected myself.
Idealizing to illustrate the predetermined dream
Where I have journeyed beyond,
As though I had premeditated what has been forbidden.
Intemperance of life,
Overpowered achiever, a philosopher, an elder,
Who puts out his arms, opens his hands.
Drops of rain accumulated
With emphatic sound of thundering.
Bright flashing of lighting in an instant.
Again! I was awakened.
There I was looking down from above.
The night had set in shimmering lights from below,
From the city, streets and moving cars.
What was real, what was not real.
Close your eyes.
It is your choice of a predetermined dream.

Until another time, I leave you with,
wakan tanan kici un,
Hugs,
kimi kaya



Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/02/07 03:25 PM

What a beautiful poem, Kimikaya, thank you for sharing.

I'm just popping in to let everyone know that I am off to Santo Domingo Pueblo today for their annual arts & crafts fair. This is what my article will be about this week. I'll tell you a little about it all when I return.

In the meantime, everyone have a fun and safe Labor Day Weekend!
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/03/07 10:30 AM

Hello again from Finland
I just wondered what wolf meening for Native Americans.
I think that it is very captivating animal.
Could I lear powwow? And how that would be easiest way to learn.
Or is that ok?
Is there some stories and poems that I could translate in finnish and maybe give every finnish to read that?
Have Native Americans lots of pets? How you give names for they?
Maybe here is few childish question for you.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/03/07 02:46 PM

Hello Katja,

I think you have asked a wonderful question! For I don't really know either just what a wolf has meant to Native Americans, especially in the past.

I agree they are captivating. And, for me, a wolf is mysterious and beautiful. I have an "adopted" wolf. Meaning she does not live with me but lives in a sanctuary in California. This is a wonderful organization that cares for wolves that would normally be abandoned or killed.

My "Mireya" (which means naughty girl) is described as knowing she is beautiful and can get her way with her sweet eyes! *grin* She loves to have her tummy rubbed and loves people. I do hope to meet her in person when we next travel to California.

I have a Persian Cat who does not have a NA name (Nikita MorningStar), but I do have NA dolls. And, of course, they Must be named! I choose names by thinking what the personality would be like if they were "real". I think it would be much the same with pets. For each animal does have a distinct personality.

Here are two links with many legends and stories that you may enjoy and be able to translate. And what a wonderful idea that is!

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Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/04/07 05:45 PM

Hello there!

Katja, I hope Kimikaya has answered some of your questions. The story links are both good ones, and they each have a ton of stories on their sites. Some good ones are posted above too.

Have you ever been to a pow wow Katja? I think that would be the best way to learn, would be to find someone at a pow wow to teach you. I realize that will be hard for you, being in another country, but maybe you can find something around your area, even if it is a drumming circle. I will check into our resources for you on this.

So much that I want to tell you about Wolf, but only time for one story today, so I will do more for you every day. Here is the first:

I Am The Wolf

I am the wolf, a loner at heart.
You are the human, and will rarely if ever see me.
I roam the wilderness forests and
mountains of this earth that we share.
I mate for survival, as you do
and I help my mate raise our pups in the warmth of our den,
nurturing and watching them grow and play,
as you do with your human young.

We run as a pack family,
and our members are as close as those in yours.
When a member is lost, we grieve, but go on,
just as you do.
When I am hungry, I must hunt for myself and my family,
for that is all I know.

There are no stores to cater to my every need.
Some of you have said that I am a killer,
a cold-blooded hunter of death,
but when I kill, it is to feed my family,
and I only take the old, sick, and weak,
who will die regardless.
I don't kill to hang heads for trophies on my walls,
as you do.

Now I am the hunted, by you.
You are afraid of me, because you don't understand me.
You think I am taking from your herds of plenty,
which you advertise to
big game hunters for their tourist dollars.
Yes, you are afraid of me, but I can't hurt you.
You are the one with the power to destroy my kind.
You set your traps to torture me,
and send your helicopters to kill me from the air.

I cannot fight you, for that is not my way
That is yours.
I only want my freedom
to run, live, and sing to the moon.
I will share this earth with you in peace
as long as you let me.
I am the Wolf

~ Author Unknown ~

Thanks to my friend LoneWolf for sharing this one!

Have a blessed day,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/05/07 04:18 PM

Today's Wolf Teaching is by Chief Dan George:

The Wolf Ceremony - by Chief Dan George

The Wolf Ceremony

I wanted to give something of my past to my grandson. So I took him into the woods, to a quiet spot. Seated at my feet he listened as I told him of the powers that were given to each creature.

He moved not a muscle as I explained how the woods had always provided us with food, homes, comfort, and religion.

He was awed when I related to him how the wolf became our guardian, and when I told him that I would sing the sacred wolf song over him, he was overjoyed.

In my song, I appealed to the wolf to come and preside over us
while I would perform the wolf ceremony so that the bondage between my grandson and the wolf would be lifelong.

I sang.
In my voice was the hope that clings to every heartbeat.
I sang.
In my words were the powers I inherited from my forefathers.
I sang.
In my cupped hands lay a spruce seed-- the link to creation.
I sang.
In my eyes sparkled love.
I sang.
And the song floated on the sun's rays from tree to tree.

When I had ended, it was if the whole world listened with us
to hear the wolf's reply. We waited a long time but none came.
Again I sang, humbly but as invitingly as I could,
until my throat ached and my voice gave out.

All of a sudden I realized why no wolves had heard my sacred song. There were none left! My heart filled with tears. I could no longer give my grandson faith in the past, our past.
At last I could whisper to him: " It is finished!"

"Can I go home now?" He asked, checking his watch to see if he
would still be in time to catch his favorite program on TV.
I watched him disappear and wept in silence.

All is finished!

by Chief Dan George (chief of the Salish Band in Burrard Inlet, B.C.)

from: The Virtual Circle�s Aboriginal Elder�s Teachings, 2001

The Aboriginal Elders Teachings is part of the Virtual Circle Aboriginal Community......................
Virtual Circle Web site URL: www.vcircle.com
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/05/07 05:49 PM

ya ta say, my friends at the campfire,

That story from Chief Dan George is sad. I had posted it before, but it was good to read again. All of the stories and legends are good to read many times over for I feel we get a little something different from each reading. Thank you for both stories DawnEagle. A wolf is very close to my heart.

And I have a poem that is beautiful and sad, as well. It is called "Wolf Whispers" and I give it to you as a link:

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Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/06/07 08:48 PM

I loved the link Kimikaya! Thank you so much for sharing!

Here is today's Wolf info, it's some totem info on the Wolf. Enjoy!

Wolf's Wisdom Includes:

* Facing the end of one's cycle with dignity and courage
* Death and rebirth
* Spirit teaching
* Guidance in dreams and meditations
* Instinct linked with intelligence
* Social and familial values
* Outwitting enemies
* Ability to pass unseen
* Steadfastness
* Skill in protection of self and family
* Taking advantage of change


Red Wolf - Critically Endangered Species
2 Other Endangered Wolf Species

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Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/08/07 02:01 PM

Is it true that "coyote" means "trickster" in Native American language?
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/08/07 04:25 PM

Coyote is considered to be the Trickster, for he can "trick" us into learning a lesson by making us look at ourselves. He does this using humor. It is said that if we repeatedly do not learn a lesson, he will play a trick on us, to force us to learn. For instance, we may think we are angry at someone, but when Coyote finishes with us, we will realize that we are angry at ourselves, for we will be forced to look into the mirror, and find only ourself staring back. How others act is reflected in ourselves, and vice versa. When we learn the lesson, it will encourage others to do so.

Another aspect of this is that he makes us laugh at ourselves, thus proving that life and its lessons can be learned through humor, and don't have to be difficult at all. When we can laugh at how silly we have been, ignoring a lesson, then we have progressed. In other words, a great big DUH!

See the story "Coyote and the Another One" above as an example of this also. I'll post more on it later smile

Hope your Saturday is full of sunshine and laughter!
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/08/07 04:29 PM

This site has some wonderful Coyote/Trickster tales:
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Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/08/07 04:32 PM

One more story! Happy Saturday!

The Great Spirit Names the Animal People:
How Coyote Came by his Powers (Okanogan)

from Mourning Dove, Coyote Tales (1933).

The Great Spirit called all his people together from all over the earth. There was to be a change. He would give names to the people, and the Animal World was to rule. The naming was to begin at the break of day, each one having the right to choose his or her name according to who came first to the Spirit Chief's lodge. The Spirit Chief would also give each one their duty to perform in the changed conditions.

It was the night before the New World. Excitement was among the people. Each one desired a great name of note. All wished to be awake and first at the lodge of the Great Spirit Chief. Everyone wanted power to rule some tribe, some kingdom of the Animal World.

Coyote was of a degraded nature, a vulgar type of life. He was an imitator of everything that he saw or heard. When he asked a question, when he asked for information and it was given him, he would always say, "I knew that before! I did not have to be told." That was Coyote's way. He was hated by all the people for his ways. No one liked him. He boasted too much about his wisdom, about everything. Coyote went among the anxious people, bragging to everyone how early he was going to rise, how he would be the first one at the Spirit Chief's lodge. He bragged of the great name he would choose. He said, "I will have three big names to select from: there is Grizzly Bear, who will be ruler over all running, four-footed animals; Eagle, who will lead all the flying birds; Salmon, who will be chief over all the fish of every kind."

Coyote's twin brother, who took the name of Fox, said to him, "Do not be too sure. Maybe no one will be given his choice of names. Maybe you will have to retain your own name, Coyote. Because it is a degraded name, no one among the tribes will want to take it.

. . . . . . . .

Coyote went to his tepee in anger. He determined not to sleep that night. He would remain awake so as to be the first at the Spirit Chief's lodge for the name he wanted. . . . Coyote's wife (afterwards Mole), sat on her feet at the side of the doorway. She looked up at Coyote and said in a disappointed tone, "Have you no food for the children? They are starving! I can find no roots to dig."

"Eh-ha!" grunted Coyote sarcastically. He answered his wife, "I am no common person to be spoken to in that fashion by a mere woman. Do you know that I am going to be a great Chief at daybreak tomorrow? I shall be Grizzly Bear. I will devour my enemies with ease. I will take other men's wives. I will need you no longer. You are growing too old, too ugly to be the wife of a great warrior, of a big Chief as I will be."

. . . . . . . . .

Coyote ordered his wife to gather plenty of wood for the tepee fire where he would sit without sleep all night. Half of the night passed; Coyote grew sleepy. His eyes would close however hard he tried to keep them open. Then he thought what to do. He took two small sticks and braced his eyelids apart. He must not sleep! But before Coyote knew it, he was fast asleep. He was awakened by his wife, Mole, when she returned from the Spirit Chief's lodge, when the sun was high in the morning sky. . . .

Coyote jumped up from where he lay. He hurried to the lodge of the Chief Spirit. Nobody was there, and Coyote thought that he was first. . . . He went into the lodge and spoke, "I am going to be Grizzly Bear!"

The Chief answered, "Grizzly Bear was taken at daybreak!"

Coyote said, "Then I shall be called Eagle!"

The Chief answered Coyote, "Eagle has chosen his name. He flew away long ago."

Coyote then said, "I think that I will be called Salmon."

The Spirit Chief informed Coyote, "Salmon has also been taken. All the names have been used except your own: Coyote. No one wished to steal your name from you."

Poor Coyote's knees grew weak. He sank down by the fire in that great tepee. The heart of the Spirit Chief was touched when he saw the lowered head of Coyote, the mischief-maker. After a silence the Chief spoke, "You are Coyote! You are the hated among all the tribes, among all the people. I have chosen you from among all others to make you sleep, to go to the land of the dream visions. I make a purpose for you, a big work for you to do before another change comes to the people. You are to be father for all the tribes, for all the new kind of people who are to come. Because you are so hated, degraded and despised, you will be known as the Trick-person. You will have power to change yourself into anything, any object you wish when in danger or distress. There are man-eating monsters on the earth who are destroying the people. The tribes cannot increase and grow as I wish. These monsters must all be vanquished before the new people come. This is your work to do. I give you powers to kill these monsters. I have given your twin brother, Fox, power to help you, to restore you to life should you be killed. Your bones may be scattered; but if there is one hair left on your body, Fox can bring you back to life. Now go, despised Coyote! Begin the work laid out for your trail. Do good for the benefit of your people."

Thus, Coyote of the Animal People was sent about the earth to fight and destroy the people-devouring monsters, to prepare the land for the coming of the new people, the Indians. Coyote' eyes grew slant from the effects of the sticks with which he braced them open that night when waiting for the dawn of the name giving day. From this, the Indians have inherited their slightly slant eyes as descendants from Coyote.

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Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/12/07 06:00 PM

Well, Dear Katja, do you see what you have started? (said with a great big smile on my face),this wonderful discussion of the wolf!!

DawnEagle, you have posted so many, many wonderful stories about the wolf. Some have brought tears to my eyes, some have had information that I knew not of, but ALL have been wonderful!! Thank you so much for the excellence of them ALL!

And now, to make all here aware:

In the past four years, more than 600 Alaskan wolves have been brutally slaughtered by gunners in aircraft. Now the Alaska Board of Game is gearing up for another season of aerial gunning. With your help, we can stop them!

Take action now to help save the wolves -- Sign our petition to urge the Bush Administration to put an end to aerial gunning in Alaska.

Easy targets against fallen snow, wolves are gunned down from airplanes or chased to exhaustion, then shot at point blank range. State-licensed marksmen can target entire packs -- even pregnant mothers!

Last year alone, nearly 100 wolves were slaughtered from the skies. Fortunately, the state fell way short of their goals. But this year could be worse. Anxious to make up for last year, hundreds more wolves could be targeted this season.

It�s not wolf management. It�s a wolf MASSACRE.

Please, please will you sign? Perhaps with our help and that of the Great Spirit, we will make a DIFFERENCE!

pila mita le mita cola (My Thanks My Friend)
wakan tanan kici un (May the Great Spirit Bless You)
nayeli, (I love you)
kimi kaya


Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/12/07 06:08 PM

I am sorry, the link for the petition did not show up in my last post.

Perhaps this will work:

https://secure2.convio.net/dow/site/Advo...3s4luda3.app20a

Yes, I have tried it. Just copy and paste it into your browers widow and it will take you to the petition. If there are any problems, please make me aware of them.

pila mita,
kimi kaya

Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/14/07 02:22 AM

I thank you for your kind words, Kimikaya. Your posts are always most insightful, and appreciated as well. You're an angel!

Actually I think I mentioned I was going to post about the aerial gunning of wolves, and totally forgot, so I thank you again for posting that here for us. Good job!

I stopped by this evening to let Katja know that I have just come across a Native American Storytelling site that has a built in translator service (free!). Here's the link:

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Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/15/07 06:06 AM

Thank you for those wonderful wolf storys.
We have here in Finland also wolfs. And they have get people make two lines. Some people wants kill all wolfs, because wolfs eats they calfs and dogs. And ofcourse I affraid everytime my husbands go to hunting with our dog friends that someday dogs won't come aback and wolfs eated them. But still I also want that wolfs stays in our forrest.
By the way I did ask some my friend that what I should done If I want to translate some your storys, she sade that I need promised and some contract. I don't know.
Ok have you storys for kids? I think that I want to tell my kids some Native Americans story. I also want to tell my kids your wonderful culture.
Have you there now a days steamrooms? We have here in Finland place called sauna. It is almost like steamroom. We have sauna almost everyhouse. Sorry, now I discusting my culture.'
Have a Nice weekend
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/15/07 11:52 AM

KatjaP....wolves don't need to be killed. Many people think they do, because they are afraid of them. Fear cultivates hate. But to kill all the wolves disrupts the natural order. It's hard, to try to break away from conventional 'modern' thinking, isn't it? Here, in Ohio where I live, the black bear is starting to come back and occasionally when I'm out in my yard I can feel a presence. I'm never able to figure out if it is a bear spirit, or if there really is a black bear in my woods watching me. Either way, it makes me happy. The coyote is another animal here in Southern Ohio that is making a strong come-back. 'Course, people hate coyotes about as much as they hate wolves.....I cant figure it out. Every now and again at night I can hear them yipping and howling with each other. Once there was one in my front yard and it answered a call from another, more distant coyote. Brought me straight up out of my sleep, but even though it startled the bejeebers out of me I found the sound comforting. It was good that coyote felt comfortable enough to come into our yard and share his song with us. I believe that most Native Cultures and traditions consider coyote a trickster....DawnEagle? Am I right? Would you care to share more about that? And to be honest, when I see or hear coyote I tend to be more aware of things happening around me. But I think they, like the wolf are beautiful animals whose presence is vital in maintaining the balance Mother Earth so vitally needs. I am so glad you are interested in learning about Native America. I suggest you read a book called 'The Earth Shall Weep'. It's a history book of sorts, and is very informative. You can find it on Amazon.

As far as steamrooms, I'm sure they are available in the US, you know at sports clubs and spas. But I think you might be asking about Sweat Lodge. Native American use of Sweat Lodge is a sacred ceremony and my explanation of it couldn't possibly do it justice. I started a thread about Sweat Lodge on this forum and I believe DawnEagle will be doing some teachings about it soon. I would encourage you to read that thread. She is very knowledgeable about such things.

I'm so glad you're here, KatjaP. Its good to know that people from many walks of life are finding interest in the Native Americas. It is part of the prophecy.....all Peoples coming together to make a better life for all and to heal Mother. I believe it's begun. DawnEagle....please will you comment?

Love to you,
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/15/07 02:07 PM

Good Morning and Happy Weekend!

Just getting to my morning coffee here, lemme see if I can answer a question or two while I'm at it. You mentioned Coyote, I have posted a few stories on them earlier in this thread, like just a few days ago. Someone asked about Trickster... (it's going to be the last few entries on page 9, and the first one on this page, 10) my first entry on them explained somewhat about the Trickster scenario.

I think Katja, if you want to publish Native American stories in your language, you would need a contract. If you just wish to share them with others, you maintain the copyright information and it should be okay. I will see if I can find some children's stories for you. The page I mentioned has a free translator service, check it out, you might find some there. I think it would be wonderful to hear some of these tales in another language, so I applaud your efforts.

We do have a Sweat Lodge thread, as Conni mentioned. I have posted a story there about the Sweat Lodge, and will get around to posting more about them in the coming days. Stay tuned!

As you may or may not know, I live right next to the Rio Grande (river). Sometimes, late at night, we'll hear coyotes howling. We are a bit south of the city, and have a riverside park between us and the river, so there is still some natural land there for them to run around on. One of the reasons I love living here! The other is the many birds that use the river as a navigation path for their migrations. The coyotes do come down and begin killing livestock, chickens, and so forth, and have become a problem for some who are afraid of them, as Conni said. First of all, I could never kill an animal unless it were for food, and I was starving. There was a news story a few weeks ago about them finding Coyote carcasses somewhere here in town. Someone shot them and dumped their bodies. What we are afraid of will keep after us, until we get over our fear. Using guns is not overcoming fear, it is thinking one is above, or better than animals, and this just is not true. We are all equal. When we realize our fears, and face them, we grow.

Anyway, I digress. Warned you I was just starting on the coffee... heehee! I'll be back with a story later, it seems to be a good day for it. In the meantime, everyone have a wonderful Saturday.

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/17/07 04:52 PM

ya ta say, my fellow "camp-sitters"!

I sit here all alone and lonely with my little blanket, keeping the fire going, while I wait for DawnEagle to come back, as she promised (*grin*) with her story.

I feel that people are more fearful of the coyote than the wolf because it seems that they kill just for the act of killing, whereas a wolf only kills the old, ill, or injured. Therefore keeping the balance of the natural order. But I am not sure that shooting a coyote that is creating havoc is the answer.

I DO believe in hunting! Especially managed hunts. For those, too, help keep the natural order. I have hunted and shot deer. People have said to me "How can you kill 'Bambi'". Those same people are terribly uninformed. As was I. But then I was taught why hunting is Necessary. I Did not consider even picking up a rifle until I KNEW the proper way to handle it and the reason for the hunt. Those reasons ARE valid! A woman whose chooses to hunt or enjoys handling a gun is shocking to many, if not most, women. But, again, most women are uniformed and are not willing to learn. I think that is sad.

And I think it best for me now to get off this stump and stop preaching! *grin*.

I would like to leave you with a pretty traditional Apache prayer:

May the sun
bring you new energy by day.
May the moon
softly restore you by night.
May the rain
wash away your worries.
May the breeze
blow new strength into your being.
May you walk
gently through the world and know
its beauty all the days of your life.

wakan tanan kici un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/17/07 09:41 PM

I agree with you, Kimikaya....although I do not hunt, my David does. I'm happy to tend the garden. I applaud your courage and conviction.
Conni
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/18/07 02:21 AM

OMG! I forgot about StoryTelling hour... oh man, did this weekend get away from me, I am so sorry! Okay, lemme find an appropriate story for tonight, brb...

Here I am, didn't get lost this time! This one is appropriate to me today, what do you think?


The Falcon And The Duck

Native American Lore

The wintry winds had already begun to whistle and the waves to rise when the Drake and his mate gathered their half- grown brood together on the shore of their far northern lake.

"Wife," said he, "it is now time to take the children southward, to the Warm Countries which they have never yet seen!"

Very early the next morning they et out on their long journey, forming a great "V" against the sky in their flight. The mother led her flock and the father brought up the rear, keeping a sharp lookout for stragglers.

All day they flew high in the keen air, over wide prairies and great forests of northern pine, until toward evening they saw below them a chain of lakes, glittering like a string of dark-blue stones.

Swinging round in a half circle, they dropped lower and lower, ready to alight and rest upon the smooth surface of the nearest lake.

Suddenly their leader heard a whizzing sound like that of a bullet as it cuts the air, and she quickly gave the waming: "Honk! honk! Danger, danger!" All descended in dizzy spirals, but as the great Falcon swooped toward them with upraised wing, the ducklings scattered wildly hither and thither. The old Drake came last, and it was he who was struck!

"Honk, honk!" cried all the Ducks in terror, and for a minute the air was full of soft downy feathers like flakes of snow. But the force of the blow was lost upon the well-cushioned body of the Drake, he soon got over his fright and went on his way southward with his family, while the Falcon dropped heavily to the water's edge with a broken wing.

There he stayed and hunted mice as best he could from day to day, sleeping at night in a hollow log to be out of the way of the Fox and the Weasel. All the wit he had was not too much whereby to keep himself alive through the long, hard winter.

Toward spring, however, the Falcon's wing had healed and he could fly a little, though feebly. The sun rose higher and higher in the blue heavens, and the Ducks began to return to their cool northern home. Every day a flock or two flew over the lake; but the Falcon dared not charge upon the flocks, much as he wished to do so. He was weak with hunger, and afraid to trust to the strength of the broken wing.

One fine day a chattering flock of Mallards alighted quite near him, cooling their glossy breasts upon the gently rippling wave.

"Here, children," boasted an old Drake, "is the very spot where your father was charged upon last autumn by a cruel Falcon! I can tell you that it took all my skill and quickness in dodging to save my life. Best of all, our fierce enemy dropped to the ground with a broken wing! Doubtless he is long since dead of starvation, or else a Fox or a Mink has made a meal of the wicked creature! "

By these words the Falcon knew his old enemy, and his courage returned.

"Nevertheless, I am still here!" he exclaimed, and darted like a flash upon the unsuspecting old Drake, who was resting and telling of his exploit and narrow escape with the greatest pride and satisfaction.

"Honk! honk! " screamed all the Ducks, and they scattered and whirled upward like the dead leaves in autumn; but the Falcon with sure aim selected the old Drake and gave swift chase. Round and round in dizzy spirals they swung together, till with a quick spurt the Falcon struck the shining, outstretched neck of the other, and snapped it with one powerful blow of his reunited wing.

Do not exult too soon; nor is it wise to tell of your brave deeds within the hearing of your enemy.

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Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/19/07 09:37 PM

Enjoy it I did, DawnEagle. Thank you. Your stories are always so enjoyable. That is the neat thing about most Native American stories; they mean something, they have a moral.

I thank you for the vote of confidence, Conni. I, too, love to tend the garden. I hope by hunting and enjoying guns I do not come across as being less feminine. For I do consider myself a "lady" *grin*.

I see the fire is getting dim. I have no story to tell, but I shall add sticks to our fire with the hopes that someone will stop by with, perhaps, hot dogs or marshmellows and maybe even a ghost story!

heen akeeya, (smile)
kimi kaya
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/20/07 07:50 PM

Ah yes, the "Season of the Witch" is almost upon us, the time when we sit by the fire for the warmth it will bring to our souls, and tell ghost stories to scare each other. I can't wait! Halloween is also a time of Ancestor worship for me, as in "Day of the Dead", as it is celebrated in Mexico. Living in New Mexico is such a blending of cultures, that I find I have absorbed their Day of the Dead practices and added them to my usual Halloween festivities - which I usually celebrate in Mexico.

I know, many don't think of Mexico when they think of Native American culture, but I am here to tell you that there are Native tribes living in Mexico in much the same way they always have - living with nature, living off the land. One tribe that I have had the pleasure of contact with is the Tarahumara, a very private people, who still make many traditional Ceremonial craft items and sell them. I own a few of them. One day we will get around to discussing Natives of the Americas, which will include both Central and South America, as well as Canada.

Right now, I am working on an Ancestor series for us all, and exploring the Mogollon culture, an ancient tribal people who lived in southern New Mexico and northern Mexico. They left some important cliff dwellings in the Gila National Forest here, and that began my interest in them. I had hoped to bring you that article this week, but the research required is just too extensive, and it is taking longer than I thought to put it all together. In the Ancestor series, I will also explore the Anasazi, Hohokam, and Mayan cultures, as they all are intertwined through trade. Maybe next week we'll get around to that!

This week I am now working on an article on Autumn Equinox, which will be very early Sunday morning. I am going to start a thread here in the forum for everyone's thoughts on this subject, so if you want to share, go to that thread.

Ok Kimikaya, you've left me thinking about ghost stories... maybe one day soon I can post one for us here. Now if you know a good one, feel free to go ahead and post it. I'll be by the campfire, listening, and looking for sticks for these hotdogs I brought... care to join me?

Wishing you all a wonderful day,
Posted By: DawnEagle_NativeAmerEd

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/20/07 08:33 PM

Here's a seasonal story I thought I'd share:

Blue Corn Maiden and the Coming of Winter

A story of the People of the Eight Northern Pueblos along the Rio Grande in New Mexico

Blue Corn Maiden was the prettiest of the corn maiden sisters. The Pueblo People loved her very much, and loved the delicious blue corn that she gave them all year long. Not only was Blue Corn Maiden beautiful, but she also had a kind and gentle spirit. She brought peace and happiness to the People of the Pueblos.

One cold winter day, Blue Corn Maiden went out to gather firewood. This was something she would not normally do. While she was out of her adobe house, she saw Winter Katsina. Winter Katsina is the spirit who brings the winter to the earth. He wore his blueand-white mask and blew cold wind with his breath. But when Winter Katsina saw Blue Corn Maiden, he loved her at once.

He invited her to come to his house, and she had to go with him. Inside his house, he blocked the windows with ice and the doorway with snow and made Blue Corn Maiden his prisoner. Although Winter Katsina was very kind to Blue Corn Maiden and loved her very much, she was sad living with him. She wanted to go back to her own house and make the blue corn grow for the People of the Pueblos.

Winter Katsina went out one day to do his duties, and blow cold wind upon the earth and scatter snow over the mesas and valleys. While he was gone, Blue Corn Maiden pushed the snow away from the doorway, and went out of the house to look for the plants and foods she loved to find in summer. Under all the ice and snow, all she found was four blades of yucca.

She took the yucca back to Winter Katsina's house and started a fire. Winter Katsina would not allow her to start a fire when he was in the house.

When the fire was started, the snow in the doorway fell away and in walked Summer Katsina. Summer Katsina carried in one hand fresh corn and in the other many blades of yucca. He came toward his friend Blue Corn Maiden.

Just then, Winter Katsina stormed through the doorway followed by a roar of winter wind. Winter Katsina carried an icicle in his right hand, which he held like a flint knife, and a ball of ice in his left hand, which he wielded like a hand-ax. It looked like Winter Katsina intended to fight with Summer Katsina.

As Winter Katsina blew a blast of cold air, Summer Katsina blew a warm breeze. When Winter Katsina raised his icicle-knife, Summer Katsina raised his bundle of yucca leaves, and they caught fire. The fire melted the icicle.

Winter Katsina saw that he needed to make peace with Summer Katsina, not war. The two sat and talked.

They agreed that Blue Corn Maiden would live among the People of the Pueblos and give them her blue corn for half of the year, in the time of Summer Katsina. The other half of the year, Blue Corn Maiden would live with Winter Katsina and the People would have no corn.

Blue Corn Maiden went away with Summer Katsina, and he was kind to her. She became the sign of springtime, eagerly awaited by the People.

Sometimes, when spring has come already, Winter Katsina will blow cold wind suddenly, or scatter snow when it is not the snow time. He does this just to show how displeased he is to have to give up Blue Corn Maiden for half of the year.

+++++++++++++++++++

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Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/21/07 07:07 PM

A wonderful tale, DawnEagle. Yes, the "Season of the Witch" is a fun time, but oh dear, the ghost stories are hard to come by.

Tarahumara is a tribe I am unfamiliar with, it is such a pretty name. I anxiously await a discussion of the Natives of the Americas.....I have much to learn.

Glad to see you have brought hotdogs, DawnEagle. I have found the sticks and have brought marshmallows and have also brought
"The Strange Origin of Corn".

A long time ago, when the Indians were first made, one man lived alone, far from any others. He did not know fire, and so he lived on roots, bark, and nuts.
This man became very lonely for companionship. He grew tired of digging roots, lost his appetite, and for several days lay dreaming in the sunshine.
When he awoke, he saw someone standing near and, at first, was very frightened.

But when he heard the stranger's voice, his heart was glad, and he looked up. He saw a beautiful woman with long light hair!
"Come to me," he whispered.
But she did not, and when he tried to approach her, she moved farther away.

He sang to her about his loneliness, and begged her not to leave him.

At last she replied,
"If you will do exactly what I tell you to do, I will also be with you."

He promised that he would try his very best. So she led him to a place where there was some very dry grass.
"Now get two dry sticks," she told him, "and rub them together fast while you hold them in the grass."

Soon a spark flew out. The grass caught fire, and as swiftly as an arrow takes flight, the ground was burned over. Then the beautiful woman spoke again:
"When the sun sets, take me by the hair and drag me over the burned ground."
"Oh, I don't want to do that!" the man exclaimed.
"You must do what I tell you to do," said she. "Wherever you drag me, something like grass will spring up, and you will see something like hair coming from between the leaves. Soon seeds will be ready for your use."

The man followed the beautiful woman's orders.
And when the Indians see silk on the cornstalk, they know that the beautiful woman has not forgotten them.
Source: ~BamaRiver~

Perhaps someone will bring corn for us to roast on our fire. I have heard they are excellent fixed that way. Of course that means we will need butter and salt, as well. Hummm...sounds like the making of a yummy picnic! *grin* And is this not the perfect time to meet around a warming fire?

heen akeeya,
kimi kaya

Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/10/07 03:08 AM

I have a story that we saw on a documentary in my cultural anthropology class.

A Native American wrote a prayer down and asked the bear to take it to the sun but the bear replied, "I would be honored to take it to the sun but I can only climb to the top of that tall tree. I do know one who may be able to take it to the sun though."

The bear called to his friend the eagle and he asked the eagle if he could take the prayer to the sun. The eagle told them that he would try.

He flew up high into the sky. Higher and higher he flew until he reached the sun. The eagle gave the prayer to the sun and when the sun read it, he was very touched. He told the eagle to give him a feather and the eagle pulled off a tail feather and gave it to the sun. The sun kissed the tip of the feather and gave it back to the eagle and that is why the eagles have black tips on their tail feathers because they were singed from the kiss of the sun.

I hope I got that right. It was told quick in the documentary.
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/20/07 05:50 AM

I don't know any Native American stories so I can't tell you any.
But how are you all? It has been so long time to visit in here.

But I just came to say have a nice weekend all
Your friend from Finland
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/20/07 11:25 AM

It has been a long time since anyone visited the campfire. Has it gone out? Should we scatter these ashes and build a new fire?
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/25/07 05:08 PM

ya ta say Katja and Connie,

I, too, have not visited the campfire is quite some time. It became necessary for me to purchase a new computer and I'm still trying to get all set up.

Even before this I felt the fire had gone out.....Perhaps DawnEagle will stop by and decide what should be done.

Until then, I wish you Blessings from the Great Spirit.
kimi kaya
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/13/07 05:49 AM

In Finland most hated and loved wild animal is wolf.
And most huter and farmer is ready to kill all wolves what they see. I think that wolwes belongs our nature, but those animals who stays too near our homes to kill dogs and calfs should be scared away or killed. Sad somehow, but I think that wolwes has better be in forrest than near peoples home
Posted By: ribadavia

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/17/07 12:04 PM

Hello. I am new here, but I just wanted to say that I really enjoy reading everyone's posts & especially the stories passed on by DawnEagle and kimikaya. Perhaps next time I'll be brave enough to write more. smile

In peace,
Erica
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/21/07 04:14 PM

[img]http://[IMG]http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s7/bojsows/Prayingrocks.jpg[/img][/img]


look at this picture. It was emailed to me today. Looks like rocks, right? Well, tilt your head to the left and look at it lengthwise.
Posted By: cela

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/21/07 04:51 PM

I see the buddah, but what was it, really--a croc? Do you think someone "doctored" the picture?
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/21/07 05:08 PM

It isn't a Buddha. Well, I guess it is what you want to see. To me it looks like a Native American woman praying with her child. It's not a croc either. It is supposed to be a rocky hill. The reflection of the hill in the water makes it look two people praying.
Posted By: cela

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/23/07 01:14 AM

Oh, I see it now--all I saw the first time was the child which looked like a buddah to me. If it's a real photo, it's amazing.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/24/07 07:33 PM

ya ta say shils aash,

I agree about the picture, Vance, it looks like a Native American woman and child praying.

Today, November 24th., is Native American Day.
I hope we all honor our Native friends and family, especially our elders. But, not just today.....every day.

I would like to offer:

Native American
Code of Ethics:


Rise with the sun to pray. Pray alone. Pray often. The Great Spirit will listen, if you only speak.

Be tolerant of those who are lost on their path. Ignorance, conceit, anger, jealousy and greed stem from a lost soul. Pray that they will find guidance.

Search for yourself, by yourself. Do not allow others to make your path for you. It is your road, and yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you.

Treat the guests in your home with much consideration. Serve them the best food, give them the best bed and treat them with respect and honor.

Do not take what is not yours whether from a person, a community, the wilderness or from a culture. It was not earned nor given. It is not yours.

Respect all things that are placed upon this earth�whether it be people, animal or plant. Honor the Spirit in all things.

Honor other people�s thoughts, wishes and words. Never interrupt another or mock or rudely mimic them. Allow each person the right to personal expression.

Never speak of others in a bad way. The negative energy that you put out into the universe will multiply when it returns to you. All persons make mistakes. And all mistakes can be forgiven. Bad thoughts cause illness of the mind, body and spirit. Practice optimism.

Nature is not for us, it is a part of us. They are part of your worldly family.

Children are the seeds of our future. Plant love in their hearts and water them with wisdom and life�s lessons. When they are grown, give them space to grow.

Avoid hurting the hearts of others. The poison of your pain will return to you.

Be truthful at all times. Honesty is the test of ones will within this universe.

Keep yourself balanced. Your mental self, spiritual self, emotional self, and physical self�all need to be strong, pure and healthy. Work out the body to strengthen the mind. Grow rich in spirit to cure emotional ails.

Make conscious decisions as to who you will be and how you will react. Be responsible for your own actions.

Respect the privacy and personal space of others. Do not touch the personal property of others�especially sacred and religious objects. This is forbidden.

Be true to yourself first. You cannot nurture and help others if you cannot nurture and help yourself first.

Respect others religious beliefs. Do not force your belief on others.

Share your good fortune with others. Participate in charity. Be willing to give back to the people, so that People will live.

Very wise words. Agreed? I am sorry that I do not know the author.

Welcome to the "campfire", Erica! Please do not be shy, write anything you choose here. As you see, "things" are very relaxed here.

Has anyone heard from, or know anything about DawnEagle? She has not been here is such a long time. Should we be concerned?

Until next time, I leave you with my favorite saying:
wakan tanan kici un.....May the Great Spirit Bless You.

ka dish day,
kimi kaya


Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/25/07 10:27 AM

Yes I havent seen DawnEagle in a long time either. Does anyone know how to get a hold of her to make sure everything is okay?
Posted By: ribadavia

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/18/07 10:10 AM

Hello everyone. Thanks for posting the Native American code of ethics, kimikaya. I printed it out & read it often for inspiration and guidance.

Is anyone else out there a fan of Leslie Marmom Silko's literary works? I finished Ceremony & am currently reading Almanac of the Dead. The latter is disturbing at times but very powerful.

I also have a question for everyone. Where do you go or what do you do for spiritual guidance/growth? Lately I've been feeling the need to develop my own spirituality & have felt dissatisfied with relying on books & independent spiritual practices ... i.e. yoga, meditation.

Stay warm this holiday season!

In peace,
Erica
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/24/07 09:09 PM

Christ Tunpi Le Mita Cola.

"A NATIVE CHRISTMAS STORY"


We never knew of Christmas,

A certain day to celebrate.

We enjoyed many festivities,

On one we did not concentrate.


Then the "white eyes" came,

Taught us their civilized ways.

Of a man named Jesus,

And how we should listen to his ways.


How he was born on a night,

As a special star lit the sky.

How beings called Angels,

Sang about wonderful things on high.


The exchanging of gifts and love,

With family and friends.

This was a wonderful way,

To watch winter transcend.


We learned of a holiday,

Growing with much fame.

Its about love and Christ.

Christmas is its name.

Author Unknown

May You all be Blessed with His Love.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
kimi kaya


Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 01/04/08 04:51 AM

Hello for everyone and Happy New Year 2008.
How is your life?
And Greetings from cold Finland
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/11/08 10:31 PM

Hello to all and blessings to each of you. I am the new Native American editor and have really enjoyed reading all your entries here at the Campfire. You all sound like very spiritual and loving people and I would like to join you in discussions. I would love it, Connidee, if you could Smudge for me and teach me how to do this. Since I am new here I need the blessings and cleansing you can offer.
I will return soon with some stories or other useful or interesting info. May the Great Spirit bless you all.
Posted By: Lady J

Re: The Hello Place - 01/11/08 11:55 PM

Another new one! Wow, welcome!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 01/12/08 09:02 PM

Ya Ta Say Phyllis,

I, too, would like to Welcome You and wish You much Success and Happiness in your new endevor. Pilamaya!

The campfire had all but gone out. I was sad to see this as I loved the stories and all other entries. I especially loved the people that sat around the fire and added "sticks" to it. I feel they all became my Friends! I missed them.
Oh Yes! We had marshmellows Too! *grin*

I shall add to the fire and hope to come back with a story. I now pass the "Talking Stick" to my Friends.

And to All I would like to say:

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, May the Great Spirit Bless You.

Ka Dish Day, Until We Meet Again
Nayeli,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/13/08 09:28 PM

Ya Ta Say, Kimi.
Thank you for your welcome and encouragement. Maybe with your help we can rekindle the Campfire and bring in more storytellers to share with us. I truly appreciate and welcome readers like you to our forum and Campfire.

I will come up with some stories soon to help our fire glow brighter. If there are any of you standing around the outer rim of the fire glow, we encourage you to enter and be a part of the joy of sharing.

Walk in peace and many blessings to you.
Posted By: Jaebae55

Re: The Hello Place - 01/15/08 01:09 AM

Thank you for inviting me into your campfire. I like it here
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/15/08 07:20 PM

Hi Jae,

Welcome to our Campfire and thank you for sharing your beautiful words. I hope you come back often to join us and to bask in the warm glow of the fire in our camp and within our spirits and hearts.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 01/23/08 07:02 PM

Hello my Fellow Campfire Sitters!

Just south of where I live is a town named 'Plant City' (Florida)It is known for the wonderful strawberries that are grown there.
With that in mind I bring you the Cherokee legend of the origin of strawberries:

When the first man (a s ga ya) was created and a mate was given to him, they lived together very happily for a time, but then began to quarrel, until at last the woman (a ge ya) left her husband and started off toward the Sun land (Nundagunyi), in the east.
The man followed alone and grieving, but the woman kept on steadily ahead and never looked behind, until the Creator, took pity on him and asked him if he was still angry with his wife. He said he was not, and Creator then asked him if he would like to have her back again, to which he eagerly answered yes.

So Creator caused a patch of the finest ripe huckleberries to spring up along the path in front of the woman, but she passed by without paying any attention to them. Farther on he put a clump of blackberries, but these also she refused to notice. Other fruits, one, two, and three, and then some trees covered with beautiful red service berries, were placed beside the path to tempt her, but she went on until suddenly she saw in front of her a patch of large ripe strawberries, the first ever known.

She stooped to gather a few to eat, and as she picked them she chanced to turn her face to the west, and at once the memory of her husband came back to her and she found herself unable to go on. She sat down, but the longer she waited the stronger became her desire for her husband, and at last she gathered a bunch of the finest berries and started back along the path to give them to him. He met her kindly and they went home together.

Leave it to a woman to just up and leave, eh! *grin*

So, our fire burns brightly once more. I just know there are others that would love to add "sticks" to keep our fire going!
Hummm, does that sound like a challenge? *grin*

ka dish day,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/23/08 11:52 PM

Thank you, Kimi Kaya, for coming back to the campfire. I enjoyed your story of the first strawberries. I hope more people come back and share their stories and legends and thoughts with us.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/26/08 07:39 PM

Hello and Blessings to all. I wrote a short story for our campfire gathering. Hope you like it.

Grandfather sat outside his tipi, watching the children play in the early evening, the scents of the cool summer's night air and the woodland plants coming gently to him. He sat with his robe over his shoulders, feeling good after his evening meal of venison stew and bannock bread. Now he began to get sleepy and an image of Little Sparrow, his wife of many years, came to him. He missed her greatly and wished she was there with him to watch their grandchildren grow. As he dozed he heard her say, "I am watching, Brave Bear. I see our grandchildren and I see what is in your heart, for I love you greatly. I see you, an old man, coming to the end, yet at the beginning, and I see the babies growing, beginning again the circle of life. Come with me, Brave Bear. Come where you belong now and know that your life has been good and full. The Great Spirit has blessed us and now it is time we let the young ones go on with their own lives. They will remember us and keep the teachings we gave to them and carry on the traditions, and the Great Spirit will give them many blessings." Grandfather smiled, remembered when, as a child, his Grandfather taught him how to catch the great salmon in the sacred rivers. He remembered so many things. Then Grandfather slept and turned towards Little Sparrow.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place - 01/27/08 06:44 AM

One day Fox was out walking along. He'd been hunting but had no luck. It was a long time since he'd eaten. His stomach was growling so loudly he could hardly hear anything else.
Suddenly he realized someone was coming singing a song. Quicker than the flick of a wren's tail Fox leaped off the path and crouched down on his belly in the bushes. Louder and louder grew the song.

Then Fox saw something begin to appear over the crest of the hill. It was a single heron feather. Fox moved his front paws, getting ready to leap out at the bird he thought the feather was attached to.
But as the feather lifted higher and higher, he realized it was no bird at all. It was the feather attached to the top of a gustoweh, the head-dress of an Iroquois man whose face now bobbed into sight as he came over the hill on horseback.
If he sees me, Fox thought, I can forget about my hunger forever! It was well known that fox skins were prized by the Iroquois. Fox tried to make himself smaller than a mouse, hoping he wouldn't be seen.

Closer and closer the man came. He was wearing fine clothes and Fox could hear the words of man's song very clearly now. It was a boasting song.
"No one is braver than Heron Feather," sang the young man. "And I should know that for I am he. No one wears finer clothing. No one is a better fisherman. If you doubt this, look and see."

He was on his way to the lodge of a young woman he had been watching for some time. He was going to try to impress her and her mother so that the girl would ask him to marry her. His song and his fine clothing were part of the plan.

But Fox was no longer listening to Heron Feather's song. He was not seeing those fine clothes. All of Fox's attention was on what he was smelling. Fish. That large bag hanging from the young man's blanketroll was full of fish! Fox's mouth watered and his tongue hung out. It had been such a long time since he had eaten fish. His fears left him. The young man on the horse passed him by, but Fox's thoughts were far ahead.

Yes, Fox said to himself. I think there is a way. As quickly as he could, he ran along through the woods keeping out of sight of the road. Soon he was ahead of the Iroquois man. Just around a bend, Fox laid himself down by the edge of the path. He closed his eyes and opened his mouth so that his tongue hung out in the dirt. Not moving a muscle, he waited. Soon he began to near Heron Feather's boasting song.

Heron Feather was so intent on his singing, trying to find a few more words to describe just how fine he looked in his new white buckskin breechclout that he almost rode right past Fox. When he saw Fox out of the corner of his eye, he stopped.
"Enh," he said, "what is this?" He climbed down from his horse.
"Kweh, a dead fox?"
Picking up a long stick he carefully prodded the side of the animal. It did not move.
"Nyoh," he said, "it is surely dead."
He bent down and looked at it closely. It was skinny, but the pelt was in fine condition. He picked it up by the tail.
"Hmm, it has not been dead for long. It only stinks a little bit."
When he said that, Fox's mouth opened a little and his lips curled back from his teeth, but Heron Feather did not notice.
"Hmm," Heron Feather said, "maybe I should skin it out now."
When he said that one of Fox's eyes twitched a little, but Heron Feather did not notice.
"Neh," he went on, "I should not skin him out now. If I do I may dirty my fine new clothes. I will just take him with me."

He walked back to his horse and began to unlace the bag.
"Weh-yoh," he smiled, "when Swaying Reed's mother sees this fox I caught she will know I am a great hunter. Then she will surely allow her daughter to bring me marriage bread."
He dropped the fox in with his fish, laced the bag shut and climbed back on his horse. Soon he was singing again. This time it was a song about how great a hunter Heron Feather was.

Inside the bag Fox lay still for a few minutes. Then he began to gnaw at the side. When he had made a hole large enough, he began to drop the fish out, one by one.
Finally, when all the fish were gone, he made the hole larger and jumped out to freedom and his best meal in many days.

Too busy with his singing, Heron Feather did not even notice. He rode all the way to the village where Swaying Reed lived. He stopped in front of her mother's lodge and sat there on his horse, singing til many people had gathered around.
He sang of his beautiful clothes, of the many fish he caught (he actually had traded his mother's beaded moccasins for them), of all the animals he hunted and trapped.
Swaying Reed and her mother came out of the lodge and watched as he reached back for his bag. Now he would show them what a good provider he was!

When he held up the bag and saw that it was empty with a hole in the bottom he stopped singing. Turning around, he rode silently away.
He learned that day that boasting songs do not make a person great. It is one thing to find a fox and another skin it.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/27/08 07:01 PM

Vance,

I love your story of fox. Good lesson to learn!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 01/29/08 08:35 PM

Ahhh, what wonderful stories, Phyllis and Vance! Pilamaya!
Just look at how very brightly our campfire now burns!

I have no story today, but some beautiful words that spoke to me!
I would like to share it with you, My Dear Friends:

"Speak to me of serenity, of treasures yet to be found, of peace that flows like a river. Tell me of tranquil places that no hand has marred, no storm has scarred. Give me visions of standing in sunlight or the feeling of spring mist against my cheek as I live and move and breathe. Show me paths that wind through the wild lilies and beds of buttercups. Sing me songs like the mingled voices of wrens and meadowlarks, the lowing of gentle cows, the soft mother-call of a mare to her colt. Lead me past a glass-smooth pond where frogs croak of coming-out parties, their graduation from frisky tadpoles to squat green frogs. Find me a place in the sunlight to sit and think and listen to the sweet inner voice that says so quietly", "Peace, be still."

Peace be with You All.

Heen Akeeya (smile),
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 01/30/08 08:00 PM

Kimi Kaya, what beautiful words indeed! Thank you for sharing with us. Blessings and peace to you.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place - 02/01/08 06:00 AM

Grandmother Spider Steals the Sun
[CHEROKEE]


In the beginning there was only blackness, and nobody could see anything. People kept bumping into each other and groping blindly. They said: "What this world needs is light."
Fox said he knew some people on the other side of the world who had plenty of light, but they were too greedy to share it with others. Possum said he would be glad to steal a little of it. "I have a bushy tail," he siad. "I can hide the light inside all that fur." Then he set out for the other side of the world. There he found the sun hanging in a tree and lighting everything up. He sneaked over to the sun, picked out a tiny piece of light, and stuffed it into his tail. But the light was hot and burned all the fur off.

The people discovered his theft and took back the light, and ever since, Possoum's tail has been bald.
"Let me try," said Buzzard. "I know better than to hide a piece of stolen light in my tail. I'll put it on my head." He flew to the other side of the world and, diving straight into the sun, seized it with his claws. He put it on his head, but it burned his head feathers off. The people grabbed the sun away from him, and ever since that time Buzzard's head has remained bald.

Grandmother Spider said, "Let me try!" First she made a thickwalled pot out of clay. Next she spun a web reaching all the way to the other side of the world. She was so small that none of the people there noticed her coming. Quickly Grandmother Spider snatched up the sun, put it in the bowl of clay, and scrambled back home along one of the strands of her web. Now her side of the world had light, and everyone rejoiced.

Spider Woman brought not only the sun to the Cherokee, but fire with it. And besides that, she taught the Cherokee people the art of pottery making.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 02/01/08 05:21 PM

Thanks, Vance, I love that tale. Here's another one:

Before there were humans on earth the animal fathers lived there. They were kept busy making prts of the world, different animals created different parts. Beaver and his family made the Great Water by building a dam at the eastern end. Manabozho, the Great Hare saw what they had done and said, "I do not want a dam there." So he stamped on the dam. But Great Hare did not stamp hard enough.

He did not destroy the dam completely, but left rapids, waterfalls and whirlpools. Great Hare lived in land called Michilimackinak, with islands, rippling water, wide spreading shade trees and leaping fish.

Manabozho made the first fish net after watching Spider weave her web. He knew that nets could help catch fish.

Wild rice grew in the land of the Great Hare. He discovered it and taught the Indians how to use it. Manabozho showed the Chippewa the islands of wild rice in the lake, and he showed them how to cut paths through the rice beds and how to beat ripe heads of grain into their canoes. The Indians then taught the white man about wild rice.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 02/01/08 06:26 PM

Ya Ta Say Everyone!

I believe that there are no others that can tell a story like a Native American! I so enjoyed reading the two above. Pilamaya Phyllis and Vance.

But...are we the only three sitting around this warm and inviting fire? I would love to see others join us; with a story, or poem, or just to stop by and say 'Hello'.

There is a poem on my desk that I would like to share:

"May the Great Spirit Bless you with the joy of life,
The warmth of love and the wonder of Spring.

May the winter snows that covered the earth
Fill the springs with sparkling water.

May Mother Earth guide your feet.

May Father Sky keep his arms around you.

May Grandfather Sun warm your cold days.

May Grandmother Moon keep
The glow in your heart.

May the new Spring bring you
Warmth, Love, and Peace".

And may we all walk in Love and Peace,
kimi kaya



Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 02/01/08 11:31 PM

How beautiful your poem is, Kimi. Thank you so much!

Blessings and walk in peace.
Phyllis
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 02/13/08 08:17 PM

Happy Valentine's Day to all around the campfire.

And may I offer you some Indian Wishes...


May the years ahead give you a
peaceful ride with the wind...

May the sun light your way as gentle waters
carry you to places of undiscovered joys...

From sunrise to sunset...
May your day be a journey of the imagination and spirit...

May love and joy rush through your
day like a cool mountain stream...

May the path be smooth beneath your feet...

May your heart be as free as the wind!

For the strength of your spirit, the gentleness
of your heart, the courage of your dreams...
you are greatly admired.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 02/14/08 01:09 AM

Kimi,

That is so beautiful. Did you write that? You are a wonderful writer. Thank you.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

The Campfire Circle - 02/14/08 06:26 PM

Welcome back to our Campfire. Our fire needs more sticks, songs, poems and sharing. Kimi Kaya, Connidee and Vance - you are all so great at writing and sharing. I have a legend I would like to share with you:

Tlingit-Haida Creation Myth

Before the world came into being, a spirit ruled from the clouds. Beneath his realm was nothing but water. Raven was servant to the spirit. One day Raven was far from his home in the sky and became very weary. He flew on and on over the vast body of water, but could find no place to rest. Finally, he began to beat the water with his wings. He beat so hard that waves on each side of him rose up high, almost to the clouds. The waves suddenly became rocks that increased and spread into islands. Sandy beaches formed, and eventually plants grew from the sand.
Rave decided the land would be his, but after a while he grew lonely all by himself. He took two large piles of shells and from them he created two human beings, both women. Soon the women complained that Raven should not have made two women; one should have been a man. So Raven transformed one into a man, and that made everyone happy. That first pair was the ancestor of the Indians who lived on the islands.
Unfortunately, it was not long before the people began to quarrel, and they quarreled and quarreled. At last the spirit came down from his cloud kingdom and warned them that they would be destroyed if they could not learn to live in peace. And for a while, the quarreling ceased. It started once again, however, and the spirit changed them into cedar trees. He then told the others, "If you can learn to live in peace, you will have these lovely trees for many things: planks for houses, trunks for canoes, bark and roots for mats and baskets. From inner bark you will make clothing." The people had learned their lesson well, and from that time they have used cedar trees for all those things.
Posted By: bahrain

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/14/08 06:43 PM

Phyllis, I know this story very well. I live in a Tlingit village and was adopted by the Raven Clan.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/14/08 10:28 PM

Bahrain,
Thank you so much for sharing that information. I grew up in the Pacific Northwest and my father had many stories of the time he lived with his tribal friends in the Flathead area. Raven has always been one of my favorite beings. Do you have any other stories you can share with us? There is one called "How Raven stole Squirrel's Potlatch", but I cannot remember it all. My brother worked at the March Point Trading Post for the Swinomish and I miss their fantastic Salmon Barbeque feasts.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/15/08 12:08 AM

How Raven Stole Crow's Potlatch

Once upon a time, a long time ago, in the Pacific Northwest, there lived a magical bird named Raven. Raven was a shape shifter. He could turn himself into a man and then back again into a bird simply by pulling his beak over his head, like a mask. Raven practiced and practiced until he could quickly turn himself into any animal. Using his special power of shape shifting, Raven could fool other animals into thinking he was, well, just about anybody.
Raven was very smart. He had considerable charm. He was also a thief and a liar. Raven used his charm to make his lies sound like truth. Creatures who trusted Raven often found themselves in big trouble. But Raven did not care. Raven was as selfish as he was clever.

One day, Raven looked up at the sky. "Winter is coming," he said, in a surprised sort of way. "The snows will fall soon. I bet Squirrel has piled up lots of food by now," Raven said thoughtfully.

But when he flew by Squirrel's house, Squirrel did not even bother to look up. He knew Raven. "Go away, Raven," snapped Squirrel. "You are not stealing food from me. Not one single nut."

In a pout, Raven spread his wings and soared away. "Bear will have food," he thought. But when Raven arrived at Bear's cave, Bear was sound asleep for the winter. All Bear's food was stored in Bear's belly.

"Goose always knows where good food is hiding," Raven laughed. But when Raven arrived at Goose's home, no one was about. Goose had flown south for the winter, and had taken his whole family with him.

Raven soared off to the top of a tree to think things over. An idea took shape in his devious mind. Grinning broadly, Raven soared off in search of Crow. Crow was Raven's cousin.



Crow


"Crow!" Raven called out when he spotted him. "Everyone's talking about your beautiful voice! They can't wait to hear you sing!"

Crow knew that Raven was selfish. Crow knew Raven was a thief. Crow knew Raven often lied. Just the same, it was hard to resist Raven's charming compliments. Crow did have a beautiful voice. It was his one vanity, as Raven well knew.

"You're inviting me to your potlatch, right?" Raven asked eagerly, sounding sure of it.

"Potlatch?" Crow puzzled. "As in huge party?" Crow shook his head. "I can't have a potlatch. It would take all my winter storage of food to feed my guests. And what about all the cooking and cleaning?"

"I'll help you get ready!" Raven offered generously. "It will be easy if we do it together!" Raven smiled warmly at his cousin. "Oh, Crow. I'm so proud to be related to you. Everyone is thrilled at the thought of hearing you sing!"

That very night Crow and Raven began cooking. The next day, while Raven flew about, inviting everyone to "his" potlatch, Crow cooked and cleaned and practiced his singing.

"The best song yet!" Raven raved, as he stopped by to taste this and nibble that. "Delicious!" Off Raven flew to invite more creatures to "his" potlatch.

Raven told each of "his" guests to use Crow's back door. That way, they would not have to wait with the crowd at the front door to enter. "After all," Raven told each and every one of them. "You are my very special guest."

Finally, the big day arrived. Everyone came to Raven's potlatch except the animals that had flown south for the winter, and the animals that were snoozing away in their caves and burrows. Everyone that is except Squirrel. Raven had not invited Squirrel.

"Here comes Elk," Raven called down to his cousin. "There's Rabbit!"

Raven soared off, supposedly to see what other guests were approaching. Instead, Raven circled around and landed behind Crow's house. First, Raven shape shifted into Elk. Then he galloped around to Crow's front door.

"Welcome to my potlatch, Elk!" Crow welcomed Raven the Elk excitedly.

"Thank you for inviting me, Crow," replied Raven, who was pretending to be Elk. "I am looking forward to hearing you sing!" Raven the Elk lowered his head and entered Crow's house.

Raven raced out the back door of Crow's house and shape shifted again. He hopped around to the front door of Crow's house, this time pretending to be Rabbit.

"Thank you for inviting me! I can't wait to hear you sing!" squealed Raven the Rabbit, in response to Crow's greeting. He hopped inside.

By then, the real Elk and the real Rabbit had arrived at Crow's back door. Raven quickly changed back into himself. "Welcome to my potlatch," Raven greeted his guests. "Elk, my good friend, come in, come in. Rabbit! How good to see you!"



Eagle

And so it continued. Raven greeted "his" guests at Crow's back door. Then he shape shifted around to Crow's front door. "Thank you for coming to my potlatch," Crow told Raven the Rooster, and Raven the Coyote, and Raven the Eagle, and Raven the Mouse, and Raven the Bobcat.

Raven found the whole thing delightful. No one suspected a thing! Raven laughed and laughed.

When all the real guests had entered though Crow's back door, Raven dragged Crow away from Crow's front door, and pushed him into the middle of the room.

"Crow is going to sing for us!" Raven shouted over the noise of the party. Crow's singing received huge cheers. "One more song, Crow," called Raven, over and over. Bursting with happiness, Crow sang and sang until his voice was hoarse.

It was a wonderful party. Everyone joked and laughed and ate and cheered Crow's songs. At the end of the potlatch, all the left over food was divided and packaged up. As was the custom, each guest received a package of food to take home.

"Thank you for inviting me to your potlatch," each guest thanked Raven.

Crow tilted his head in puzzlement. He tried to tell his guests that this was HIS potlatch. But Crow's voice was gone.

That winter, Raven received invitations to many potlatches. Raven had a wonderful time, joking and laughing and eating. At each potlatch, he received a package of food to take home. But no one invited Crow. After all, Crow had never invited them to a party. Why should they invite him?

Poor Crow. To eat that winter, he had to beg scraps of food from the People. Crow could not even tell anyone what Raven had done. Crow had lost his beautiful voice forever. The only sound he could make was a shrill "caw ". And that, I'm afraid, did not help him at all.


Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/18/08 10:19 PM

Bahrain - I would love to hear more of and from the Tlingit village where you live. I had a friend, years ago, in Washington who had kin in one of the Tlingit clans. Do you live in the village year round? Do you have potlatch's very often? Have you ever been to one of the potlatch's at March Point? I really miss the Pacific Northwest. Any news you can share will be greatly appreciated.

Blessings,
Phyllis
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/19/08 03:24 PM

Vance, thank you for sharing the story about Raven and Crow.
Does anyone else have a story or song or poem to share?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/19/08 04:03 PM

How Raven Named the Birds

Raven was always hungry. One day he saw some children playing with chunks of fat, throwing them back and forth to each other. He made himself look like one of them and joined the game. Each time he caught a piece of fat, he gulped it down. Soon the children noticed what he was doing. They tried to stop Raven, but he threw dog dirt at them until they ran away.

After he finished all the fat, he was still hungry. He looked around until he found a fishing camp, and flew down to see if there was any salmon hanging up to dry. He found no food, but he found a piece of jade with some carving on it half-buried in the ground.

He dug it up and was looking at it when he saw a big spring salmon jumping in the bay. He remembered some magic his uncle taught him. He spat on the stone and called to the salmon, "This green stone is calling you, you big fat salmon. Come here." But the salmon paid no attention. Raven scratched his head and tried to remember exactly what his uncle told him. Then he looked into his medicine back and found some bits of eagle down. He put them on the jade rock and called the fish again. The salmon swam right up to him. Raven hit it with a piece of wild celery and killed it.

Raven was too lazy to cook the fish by himself, so he called all the birds together. He told them to fetch some skunk cabbage leaves to wrap the salmon in, so they could bury it in the fire and roast it. When they came back with the leaves, he threw them on the ground, yelling, "These leaves are dirty! Somebody [censored] on them!" He sent them far away to look for better ones. While they were gone, he wrapped up the salmon and buried it in the fire. When it was ready, he ate the whole thing all by himself, wrapped up the bones and put them back in the fire.

When the birds returned, Raven said, "You're too slow. I already got my own leaves. Now it's time to dig out our feast!" When they opened the bundle, they saw nothing but bones! "I don't understand how such a thing could happen!" Raven said. "Must be some bad spirits around here." He could see that the birds were suspicious, so he decided to distract them. "Tell you what, " he said. "We'll forget all about that old salmon. Dress each other up and I will give you names."

The birds had lots of fun dressing up. They tied up the blue jay's hair with a string. They added a long tail to one bird, put yellow spots on another, and a red breast on another. Raven named them and told them what to do. He told the grouse to live high up where it is wintry. He told ptarmigan to teach people how to make snowshoes, because he was good at travelling on the surface of the snow. He told the robin to make people happy with his whistle, and appointed the wild canary head of the small birds. He gave talons to the eagle and told him he would have sharp eyesight and be above all the other birds. Nowadays, the birds still do exactly what Raven told them.

Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/19/08 09:16 PM


Native American Starlore - The Native American Guide to the Constellations and their origins.

Title: Canoe Race
Tribe: Chinook
Region: Southwest Washington
Object: Orion
A big canoe (Orion's belt) and a small canoe (Orion's dagger) are in a race to see who can be the first to catch a salmon in the Big River (Milky Way). The little canoe is winning the race. Can you tell which star is the fish? It is the very bright star in the middle of the river (Sirius).


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Title: Bear and Three Hunters
Tribe: Musquakie
Region: Wisconsin
Object: Big Dipper
The bowl stars of the Big Dipper form a bear. The stars of the Dipper's handle are hunters. The tiny star near the elbow of the handle is a small dog named "Hold Tight." In autumn, when the Dipper is low to the horizon, the blood from the bear's arrow wounds drips on the trees and turns them red and brown.


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Title: Maui's Hook
Tribe: Maori
Region: South Pacific
Object: Scorpius
Maui was a powerful god but a poor fisherman. He snagged his hook (Scorpius) and line on the bottom of the sea and thought he had hooked a big fish. He pulled hard and pulled up the North Island of New Zealand, Te ika a Maui - The fish of Maui.




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Title: Spider God
Tribe: Blackfoot
Region: North Dakota, Montana
Object: Corona Borealis
The Spider God (Corona Borealis) sits in his web (Hercules) and watches over the land. Sometime he climbs down the summer Milky Way to visit the Earth.




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Title: Grizzly Bear
Tribe: Shoshoni
Region: Wyoming, Southern Idaho
Object: Cygnus



A grizzly bear (Cygnus) climbed up a tall mountain to go hunting in the sky. As he climbed, the snow and ice clung to the fur of his feet and legs. Crossing the sky the ice crystals trailed behind him forming the Milky Way.


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Title: Elk Skin
Tribe:Yakima
Region: Central Washington
Object: Cassiopeia
A Hunter killed a great elk and stretched the skin to dry by driving wooden stakes through it. Afterwards he threw the skin into the sky (Cassiopeia) where the light above shines through the stake holes forming stars.


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Title: Coyote's Eyeball
Tribe:Lummi
Region: Pacific Northwest
Object: Arcturus
The Coyote liked to show off to the girls by juggling his eyeballs. One day he threw one so high it stuck in the sky (Arcturus).



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Title: Two Dogs
Tribe: Cherokee
Region: Tennesee, North Carolina
Object: Canis Major
There are two dogs (alpha and beta Canis Majori) who guard the path to the land of souls. To get past the dogs one should bring food. Be warned, if you give food to the first dog (alpha) he will let you pass, but if you fail to save some food for the second dog (beta) you will be trapped between them forever.


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Title: Grizzly Sisters
Tribe: Sierra
Region: California
Object: Aries
Grizzly sisters (Aries) use to play with Deer sisters in a cave. One day Grizzly mother ate Deer mother. Deer sisters retaliated by trapping Grizzly sisters in the cave.


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Painting by Richard Hook
Title: Six Wives
Tribe: Western Mono
Region: Central California
Object: Taurus
Six wives (Pleiades cluster) were hiking in the woods and discovered some wild onions. They ate the onions which gave them skunk breath. Their Husbands (Hyades cluster) threw them out of their huts. When the wives went up into the sky to live, the lonely husbands eventually followed but never catch up to them.


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Title: Walks All Over the Sky
Tribe: Tsimshian
Region: Pacific Northwest
Object: Sun, Moon, Stars
Back when the sky was completely dark there was a chief with two sons, a younger son, One Who Walks All Over the Sky, and an older son, Walking About Early. The younger son was sad to see the sky always so dark so he made a mask out of wood and pitch (the Sun) and lit it on fire. Each day he travels across the sky. At night he sleeps below the horizon and when he snores sparks fly from the mask and make the stars. The older brother became jealous. To impress their father he smeared fat and charcoal on his face (the Moon) and makes his own path across the sky.


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Title: Three Legged Rabbit
Tribe: Western Rocky
Region: Rocky Mts.
Object: Sun, Moon, Stars
A three legged rabbit made himself a fourth leg from wood. The rabbit thought the Sun was too hot for comfort so he went to see what could be done. He went east at night to the place where the Sun would rise. When the Sun was half way up the Rabbit shot it with an arrow. As the Sun lay wounded on the ground the Rabbit took the white of the Suns eyes and made the clouds. He made the black part of the eyes into the sky, the kidneys into stars, and the liver into the Moon, and the heart into the night. "There!" said the Rabbit, "You will never be too hot again."


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Title: Coyote and Eagle Steal the Sun and Moon
Tribe: Zuni
Region: New Mexico, Arizona
Object: Sun, Moon
Back when it was always dark, it was also always summer. Coyote and Eagle went hunting. Coyote was a poor hunter because of the dark. They came to the Kachinas, a powerful people. The Kachinas had the Sun and the Moon in a box. After the people had gone to sleep the two animals stole the box. At first Eagle carried the box but Coyote convinced his friend to let him carry it. The curious Coyote opened the box and the Sun and Moon escaped and flew up to the sky. This gave light to the land but it also took away much of the heat, thus we now have winter.


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Title: Boy and the Sun
Tribe: Hopi
Region: Northern Arizona
Object: Sun, Moon, Milky Way

Painting by Richard Hook
A boy once lived with his mother's mother for he didn't know who his father was. His grandmother said to ask the Sun about his father, surely the Sun would know. One morning the boy made a flour of crushed tortoise shell, cornmeal, coral, and seashells. He threw the flour upwards and it made a path into the sky (Milky Way). He climbed the path and when he found the Sun he asked "Who is my father?" and the Sun replied, "You have much to learn." The boy fell to Earth. He then made a wooden box from a Cottonwood tree and sealed himself in it as it floated west down a river to find the Sun again. The box washed ashore where two rivers join. He was freed from the box by a young female rattlesnake. Together they traveled west to find the Sun. They saw a meteor fall into the sea on its way to the Sun's house. They asked it for a ride. In this way they made it to the Sun's house. There they met the Sun's mother (the Moon) who was working on a piece of turquoise. That evening when the Sun came home from his days work, the boy asked again, "Who is my father?" And then the Sun replied "I think I am."


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Title: Sun and her Daughter
Tribe: Cherokee
Region: Tennesee, North Carolina
Object: Sun, Moon
As the Sun traveled across the sky she would stop in the middle each day to have dinner at her daughter's house. Now the Sun hated people because they would always squint when they looked at her. "They screw up their faces at me!" she told her brother the Moon. "I like them," said the Moon, "they always smile at me." They Sun was jealous and decided she would kill the people by sending a fever. Many people were dying and those remaining decided they would have to kill the Sun. With some magic, one of the people was turned into a rattlesnake and sent to wait by the daughter's door, to bite the Sun when she stopped for dinner. But when the daughter opened the door to look for her mother the snake bit her instead. The snake returned to Earth with the Sun still alive and the daughter dead. When the Sun discovered what had happened she shut herself up in the house and grieved. The people no longer had the fever but now it was cold and dark. So, seven people were chosen to visit the land where ghosts dance to see if they could retrieve the daughter. As she danced past them they struck her with rods so she fell down, then they trapped her in a box. On the trip home she complained of not being able to breath so they opened the lid just a crack. She became a redbird and escaped, flying back to the land of ghosts. Seeing the seven people return empty handed, the Sun began to cry. This caused a great flood. To amuse the Sun and stop the flood, the people danced. This is why the people do the Sun dance to this very day.


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Title: Spider and the Sun
Tribe: Cherokee
Region: Tennesee, North Carolina
Object: Sun, Milky Way
In the beginning there was only darkness and people kept bumping into each other. Fox said that people on the other side of the world had plenty of light but were too greedy to share it. Possum went over there to steal a little piece of the light. He found the Sun hanging in a tree, lighting everything up. He took a tiny piece of the Sun and hid it in the fur of his tail. The heat burned the fur off his tail. That is why possums have bald tails. Buzzard tried next. He tried to hide a piece in the feathers of his head. That is why buzzards have bald heads. Grandmother Spider tried next. She made a clay bowl. Then she spun a web (Milky Way) across the sky reaching to the other side of the world. She snatched up the whole sun in the clay bowl and took it back home to our side of the world.


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Title: Little Brother Snares the Sun
Tribe: Winnebago
Region: Michigan
Object: Sun
In the old days people were not the chiefs and did not hunt animals. Animals were the chiefs and hunted people. They killed all the people except one girl and her little brother. They hid in a cave. The boy learned to kill snowbirds with a bow and arrow and made a robe from the feathers. They made soup from the bodies of the birds and that was the first time people ate meat. The bright sun ruined the robe one day and the little brother swore revenge. His sister helped him fashion a snare. He traveled to the hole in the ground where the Sun rises every morning. As the Sun rose he snared it and tied it up so that there was no light or warmth that day. The animals were afraid and amazed by the boy. They sent the biggest and most fearsome animal to try and free the sun. This was the dormouse which in those days was as big as a mountain. The mouse chewed through the snare freeing the sun but meanwhile the intense heat shrunk him down to his present size. Since that time the people have been the chiefs and the hunters.


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Title: The Fifth World
Tribe: Toltec
Region: Central America
Object: Sun, Earth
Five worlds and five suns were created, one after the other. The first world was destroyed because it's people acted wrongfully. They were eaten by ocelots and the sun destroyed. The second sun saw it's people turned into monkeys due to lack of wisdom. The third sun had it's world destroyed by fire, earthquakes, and volcanoes because the people didn't make sacrifices to the gods. The fourth world perished in a flood that also drowned it's sun. Before creating the fifth world, our world, the gods met in the darkness to see who would have the honor of igniting the fifth sun. Tecciztecatl volunteered. The gods built a big fire on top of a pyramid and the volunteer prepared to throw himself into the flames. He was dressed in beautiful hummingbird feathers, and gold and turquoise. Four times he tried to force himself into the suicidal fire but each time his fear drove him back. Then the lowliest of all the gods, Nanautzin, dressed in humble reeds, threw himself into the fire. Teccitztecatl was so ashamed that he too jumped into the fire. The new sun rose into the sky giving light to the fifth world.


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Title: Fox and the Moon
Tribe: Snoqualmie
Region: Washington
Object: Moon
Long ago, Snoqualm (Man in the Moon), had a spider make him a rope out of cedar bark and stretch it from the sky to the Earth. One day Fox and Blue Jay found the rope and climbed up to where the rope was fixed to the underside of the sky. Blue Jay pecked a hole in the sky and they climbed through to the sky world. Blue Jay flew to a tree while Fox changed himself into Beaver and swam in a lake. Snoqualm had set a trap in the lake which caught Beaver. Snoqualm skinned him and threw the body in the corner of the smokehouse. That night when Snoqualm was asleep Beaver got up and put his skin back on. He looked around. He took a few of the trees, and the Snoqualm's daylight making tools, some fire, and the Sun which was hidden in Snoqualm's house. He changed back into Fox then he found the hole that Blue Jay had made and took the things to Earth. He planted the trees, made daylight, gave the fire to the people, and put the Sun in it's place. When Snoqualm awoke he was very angry. He found the tracks that led to the hole. He started down but the rope broke and he fell to the Earth in a heap where he became a mountain. One can see the face of Snoqualm on one of the rocky cliffs. Today it is called Mount Si and it is near Northbend in Washington State.


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Title: Raven and the Sun
Tribe: Tsimshian
Region: Northwest
Object: Sun
Painting by Richard Hook
Once the sky had no day. When the sky was clear there was some light from the stars but when it was cloudy it was very dark. Raven had put fish in the rivers and fruit trees in the land but he was saddened by the darkness. The Sun at that time was kept in a box by a chief in the sky. The Raven came to a hole in the sky and went through. He came to a spring where the chief's daughter would fetch water. He changed himself into a cedar seed and floated on the water. When the girl drank from spring she swallowed the seed without noticing and became pregnant. A boy child was born which was really Raven. As a toddler he begged to play with the yellow ball that grandfather kept in a box. He was allowed to play with the Sun and when the chief looked away he turned back into Raven and flew back through the hole in the sky.


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Title: Coyote, Wolves, and Bears
Tribe: Wasco
Region: Columbia River, Oregon
Object: Big Dipper
Once there were five wolves who would share meat with Coyote. One night the wolves were staring at the sky. "What are you looking at?" asked Coyote. "There are two animals up there." they told him. "But we can't get to them." "That is easy." said Coyote. He took his bow and shot an arrow into the sky where it stuck. He shot another arrow which stuck into the first. Then he shot another and another until the chain of arrow reached the ground. The five wolves and Coyote climbed the arrows and the oldest wolf took along his dog. When the reached the sky they could see that the animals were grizzly bears. The wolves went near the bears and sat there looking at them and the bears looked back. Coyote thought they looked good sitting there so he left them and removed his arrow ladder. The three stars of the handle of the Big Dipper and the two stars of the bowl near the handle are the wolves. The two stars on the front of the bowl that point to the North Star are the bears. Alcor, the little star by the wolf in the middle of the handle is the dog.


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Title: Evening Star wins Morning Star
Tribe: Skidi Pawnee
Region: Kansas-Nebraska
Object: Venus
In the beginning there was only Tirawahat, which is the Universe and everything in it. Morning Star (Venus) and the Sun and the other males in sky were in favor of creating the world but Evening Star (Venus) and the Moon and the females were against it. To win the debate it was clear that Morning Star would have to win the heart of Evening Star. Many had failed, she was guarded by the Wolf (Sirius), Cougar (Auriga), Bear (Sagittarius), Bobcat (Procyon), and worst of all the Snake (Scorpius). One by one Morning Star defeated them and won the hand of Evening Star. And so the world was created.


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Title: The Lost Children
Tribe: Blackfoot
Region: North Dakota, Montana
Object: Pleiades
There were once six young brothers who were orphans. They lived from handouts and wore castaway clothing. No one cared much about them except the camp's pack of dogs. They loved the dogs and played with them all day. People were unkind to the boys because of their ragged clothes and uncombed hair. The brothers were teased by the other children who wore fine buffalo robes. The boys no longer wanted to be people. They considered becoming flowers but the buffalo might eat them. Stones? No, stones could be broken. Water could be drank, trees could be cut and burned. They decided they wanted to be stars. Stars are always beautiful and always safe. Up went the boys to the sky to become stars (Pleiades). The Sun welcomed the boys and the Moon called them her lost children. Then the Sun punished the people with a drought. Meanwhile the people heard the dogs howling at the sky. The dogs missed the boys. Finally the dog cheif asked the Sun for pity because drought hurts all creatures. Then the rains came.


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Title: Coyote as the Moon
Tribe: Kalispel
Region: Idaho
Object: Moon
Once there was no Moon for someone had stolen it. The people asked "Who will be the Moon?" The Yellow Fox agreed to give it a try but he was so bright it made the Earth hot at night. Then the people asked Coyote to try and he agreed. The Coyote was a good moon, not to bright - not to dim. But from his vantage point in the sky the Coyote could see what everyone was doing. Whenever he saw someone doing something dishonest he would shout "HEY! That person is stealing meat from the drying racks!" or "HEY! That person is cheating at the moccasin game!" Finally, the people who wished to do things in secret got together and said "Coyote is too noisy. Let's take him out of the sky." So someone else became the moon. Coyote can no longer see what everyone else is doing but he still tries to snoop into everyone else's business.


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Title: Fisher goes to Skyland
Tribe: Anishinabe
Region: Great Lakes
Object: Big Dipper
Fisher was a small animal but a great hunter. Hunting was difficult in those days because it was always winter. "Come with me." he told his friends, "We will go where the Earth is closest to Skyland. The Skyland is always warm and we will bring some of the warmth down to Earth." The Otter, Lynx and Wolverine traveled with Fisher up the mountains, closer and closer to Skyland. When they were very close Fisher said "We must jump up and break through to the land above the sky." The Otter jumped up and bumped his head on the sky. He fell on his back and slid all the way down the mountain. Lynx jumped up and bumped so hard it knocked him unconscious. Wolverine jumped up and bumped hard against the sky. He jumped again and again until the sky cracked a little. He jumped again and broke through. Fisher jumped through after him. They found Skyland to be a beautiful place, full of warmth and plants and flowers. They found cages full of birds which they released. The birds flew through the crack in the sky to the world below. The warmth of Skyland began to flow to the Earth and melt the snow. The Sky-People came out of the lodges and said "Thieves! They are taking our warm weather!" Wolverine escaped back through the crack but Fisher started working to make the crack bigger. He knew that if it were too small the Sky-People might be able to patch it. The Sky-People began chasing him and shooting arrows. Athough he was powerful, they eventually hit a fatal spot. The great Gitchee Manitou took pity on poor Fisher because he had tried to help his friends. He healed him and placed him in the sky (Big Dipper). Each autumn as Fisher is falling towards Earth the Sky-People try to patch the crack and Winter comes. Then in spring Fisher climbs back high in the sky and reopens the crack and Summer comes.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/20/08 04:12 PM

Wow, Vance - you really fed the fire!!! That is a lot of sticks, I tell you what! I read each and every one and enjoyed them so much. Thanks for making me smile.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/28/08 06:01 PM

The woman of the household had no "lord and master" when it came to deciding where she and her children would live.
In the home there came into being the faith and simplicity that marked the native people. There took root their virtues and cultural attributes. Forces, sensed but not seen, called good, went into the deep consciousness of these young minds, planted there by the Indian mother who taught her boy honesty, fearlessness and duty, and her girl industry, loyalty and fidelity. Into the character of babes and children mother-strength left the essence of strong manhood and womanhood. Every son was taught to be generous to the point of sacrifice, truthful no matter what the cost, and brave to the point of death. These impulses - generosity, truthfulness, and bravery - may be dressed and polished in schools and universities, but their fundamental nature is never touched.
After childhood days, mothers still could not forsake the part of guide and teacher - for youth, as well as childhood, must be directed, and there was no substitute. So Lakota mothers taught youth how to worship and pray, how to know mercy and kindness, and how to seek right and justice. - Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Lakota.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/28/08 06:10 PM

It is the mothers, not the warriors, who create a people and guide their destiny. - Luther Standing Bear, Oglala, Lakota
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/28/08 06:24 PM

I come to White Painted Woman,
By means of long life I come to her.
I come to her by means of her blessing,
I come to her by means of her good fortune,
I come to her by means of all her different fruits,
By means of the long life she bestows, I come to her.
By means of this holy truth she goes about.

I am to sing this song of yours,
The song of long life.
Sun, I stand here on the Earth with your song,
Moon, I have come in with your song.

White Painted Woman's power emerges,
Her power for sleep.
White Painted Woman carries this girl;
She carries her through long life,
She carries her to good fortune,
She carries her to old age,
She bears her to peaceful sleep.

You have started out on the Good Earth;
You have started out with good moccasins;
With moccasin strings of the rainbow, you have started out,
With mocassin strings of the Sun's ray, you have started out,
In the midst of plenty you have started out.

- Song for girls' puberty rights, Chiracahua Apache
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 02/29/08 12:24 AM

Burning cedar with the green berries still on it can drive away negativity and bad spirits:

When my Mother's sister came to visit, she used to burn cedar, which had green berries. When it was smoking, she would take it into every room to drive away all the evil spirits and keep them away. She always prayed when smoking the room. I use that cedar myself once in a while, even today. It was good and really worked. Today cedar is used in all ceremonies, including the Sun Dance, to drive away evil spirits that might interfere with prayers or harm people. - Agnes Yellowtail Deernose, Absaroke
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/02/08 10:03 PM

Crow Indian Water-Medicine - Blackfoot Legend

Once a Crow Indian had a son killed in war. He was in mourning, so he took his lodge into the mountains and camped there that he might have dreams in which power would be given him to revenge the death of his son.

He slept in the mountains ten nights. At last as he was sleeping, he had a dream, and in this dream, he heard drumming and singing. Then a man appeared and said, "Come over here: there is dancing." So he followed the man. They came to a lodge in which there were many old men and women. There were eight men with drums. He also saw weasel-skins, skins of the mink and otter, a whistle, a smudge-stick, some wild turnip for the smudge, and some berry-soup in a kettle. One old woman had an otter-skin with a weasel-skin around it like a belt. So the man staid there, learned the songs that these people sang, and when he came back to his people he started the Crow-water-medicine. Since that time he has had other dreams: and the skins of the beaver, the muskrat, all kinds of birds, etc., with many songs for each, have been added.

This medicine has great power. If any one wishes a horse, he calls in some of the Crow-water-medicine people. Then they pray, sing, and dance.

The power of this medicine is such that after a while a man may come along and say, "I have had a bad dream. You must paint me, that the dream may not come true." Then he gives a horse as a fee. The medicine has power also in treating the sick. The people who have this medicine meet at regular times, - on Sundays and at the time of the new moon. They paint their faces with a broad red stripe across the forehead, and one across the mouth and cheeks. A rectangle of red is also painted on the back of each hand. Some wear plumes.

Posted By: BellaShorts

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/06/08 09:34 PM

popping into say Hello!

Just wanted to say - as a stories enthusiast how charmed and intrigued I was to learn about the Stars ideas (yes, I am into astronomy as well!)

Hercules is in fact above us in the Western hemisphere these nights - he is gradually drifting over the roof and away.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/06/08 09:53 PM

Thank you for visiting, Siobhain. It is always nice to see a see a new visitor here. Did you read Vance's starlore post? He has some really great ones.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/07/08 05:37 PM

I love the sayings of Black Elk and would like to get his book: Black Elk Speaks. Has anyone read this book and what do you like best about it? Do you have a favorite story of legend of his?
Posted By: Deanna - New Age

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/10/08 04:58 AM

Wow! There are so many wonderful stories about Raven and Crow. I have a particular fondness for these birds. When we first moved into our many years ago, I used to watch these crows drop walnuts down onto the street in front of our home. It was a crack up (literally LOL).

Another time I watched one chase a mouse across the yard. The mouse got away - but crow sure did look hysterical.

We also watched one on a roof top getting stalked by a cat. It limped across the roof as the cat came slowly after it. Just as the cat pounced, it flew away and the cat tumbled (but was okay - except for being embarrassed).
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/10/08 04:04 PM

Hi Deanna, thanks for stopping by. According to the Native Americans, Crow and Raven are 'tricksters' and always thinking of crafty plans for their own benefit. Your crow was probably trying to lure the cat away from its nest of young ones, maybe. We had a pet crow when I was just a little girl. His name was Jimmy and he was always playing tricks on us.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/11/08 08:43 PM

March is Women's History Month. Are there any Native American women you would like to have me research and write an article on? On March 3 I did one on Native American Women In History and I will have one coming out next week on Rosebud Yellow Robe. If you have any requests, let me know.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/14/08 03:57 PM

MEDICINE-SONG


Sung by Geronimo


O, ha le
O, ha le!
Awbizhaye
Shichl hadahiyago niniya
O, ha le
O, ha le
Tsago degi naleya
Ah--yu whi ye!
O, ha le
O, ha le!


O, ha le
O, ha le!
Through the air
I fly upon the air
Towards the sky, far, far, far,
O, ha le
O, ha le!
There to find the holy place,
Ah, now the change comes o're me!
O, ha le
O, ha le!

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/14/08 04:10 PM

I cannot think that we are useless or God would not have created us. There is one God looking down on us all. We are all the children of one God. The sun, the darkness, the winds are all listening to what we have to say.

When a child, my mother taught me to kneel and pray to Usen for strength, health, wisdom and protection. Sometimes we prayed in silence, sometimes each one prayed aloud; sometimes an aged person prayed for all of us... and to Usen.

- Quotes from Geronimo
Posted By: Deanna - New Age

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/15/08 10:36 PM

Hi Phyllis, these are beautiful quotes. I was raised in a very strict religion that doesn't necessarily honor the earth. As a young adult, I found another path for myself. When I first learned of the spirits of the wind, the plants, animals, even the stars, I felt like I had stepped into a dreamland, and I never wanted to wake up smile

I'm so glad that now, as a mother, I can share these thoughts with my children, and they get to experience them as children.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/16/08 04:03 AM

Hi Deanna, I am so happy you found something on my forum that makes you feel good. Thank you for the compliments. Any time you would like to add a poem, quote or story regarding Native American beliefs, myths, legends, etc - please feel free to do so. That is what "The Hello Place" is all about - sharing.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/21/08 04:56 AM

Black Elk: Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux, 1863-1950
"Sometimes dreams are wiser than waking."
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/27/08 05:21 PM

I am so enthralled with Black Elk's sayings and stories right now. I just got the book "Black Elk Speaks" and am so happy with it! I am sure a lot of you have read it or at least are familiar with it, but, for those of you who are not I highly reccomend the book! I love the way Black Elk was outside his cabin, waiting for John Neihardt even though no one had told him Neihardt was coming to interview him. A fascinating book!

Do you have any favorite sayings/stories of Black Elk's?
Posted By: nadaurz

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/28/08 06:34 AM

Black Elk was a man of great vision. I currently live near where the writer Black Elk befriended was born on the Omaha Reservation. There is a beautiful sacred garden there today, but the lessons they taught are being forgotten here today. There is much fighting, discrimination, unjustice, and corruption on all sides. To take a lesson from Black Elk would do us all good. Black Elk knew the value of sacrifing some for the good of all. That means everybody doesn't get everthing they want. Black Elk saw the coming of many things-that book is amazing.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/28/08 04:23 PM

So, what, if anything, can be done, Nadaurz, to put an end to the problems in that area? How can one get something started that would help the people? Is it possible to start meetings or something to discuss the problems and possible resolutions. Can you teach them to honour the words of Black Elk and other ancestors? Something must be done to bring some peace to the people.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/28/08 09:03 PM

I have some more info on Spider if anyone is still interested.

Spider Man and Spider Woman are Navaho supernaturals or Holy People.

Spider Woman is an important mythic being among both the Eastern Pueblos and the Western Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona.

Spider, Spider Woman or Spider Man is a beneficial character in the myths and stories of the Plains, Southwestern, and Western American Indians.

Spider Woman is a very important personage in the myths of the Hopi. She even takes a part in the Sunset Crater myth, which may well have some Sinagua affiliations - The Sinagua peoples were the ones who carved out their cliff dwelligs in Arizona, now know as Montezumas Castle. The Sinagua learned much of their crafts from the Anasazis.

Posted By: nadaurz

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/31/08 02:07 AM

Things have gone past the point of any easy solutions. The feelings are rooted deep in bad behavior on both parts, both current and past. To be honest, things have deteriorated to the point another Wounded Knee II is on the horizon. In a nutshell...the Omaha tribe is aserting their right to govern reservation land such as liquor taxes and licenses, tribal sales tax, etc. The Whites (for lack of a better term) are not complying, claiming the tribe has no right within the village of Pender, Thurston County's county seat. The white business owner's filed suit in state court. Tribe says State court doesn't govern them. And around, and around, we go. State court doesn't seem to give any real ruling. At this point the state, the federal, and the tribal courts all have stuff happening and absolutely nobody is listening. This area is rich in bad blood and ready to explode. At some level everybody is right, but at no level is anybody totally right but nobody will budge an inch. Black Elk knew the survival of his people depended on changing. It greatly saddened him to see but was wise enough to see total annihilation if they didn't let it go and blend with society. I don't know how to bring that message to this area, especially to the non-Natives. Suggestions?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 03/31/08 05:27 PM

Nadaurz, I just finished reading Black Elk Speaks last night and was greatly saddened by our past history. Black Elk felt, and stated throughout the book, that he did not do all he should have to help his people, he felt he was a failure. I do not believe that. I think, even though he is gone from Earth, that he will be of great help to his people and I hope he knows that now. Change is a very difficult thing for many people to accept. However, change is sometimes the only way to reach peace or at least an attitude of tolerance and acceptance. smile
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/01/08 02:41 PM

Black Elk did all that he could do. In the end, it was Custer who destroyed him and his work.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/01/08 06:09 PM

Black Elk did a lot, Vance, and I recognize this. Black Elk himself felt he was a failure, but I believe he was not, for his teachings and strength are still very much alive today. For some reason, he felt he should have done more and did not feel he had done all that the Six Grandfathers had asked him to do. I think Black Elk was a remarkable man and did much to help his people. The US Army and Calvary acted out of fear, stupidity, and lack of intelligent leadership I believe, and thus destroyed a lot of mankind and what could have been.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/03/08 03:17 AM

Could someone PLEASE enlighten me as to who set the precedent of in-fighting, back-stabbing, general choas, and constant conflict Native American Tribes have to endure to accomplish anything? We have to scrape and claw through both inner and outer sources of conflict. There must be at least one group of us that has not had to endure this type of politcal conflict over and over again. My tribe is certainly not immune, nor any others I know of. It seems there is always a group (either internal, external, or both) that have a perpetual "need" to stick their spoons into the "Pot of Conflict and Discontent" to keep it stirred up. Once the courts are involved, no one at the BIA will go near a situation, not that they could help anyway. And we certainly (and unfortunately) cannot rely on the courts for a strict interpretation and application of the law in their rulings. We seem to have a nationwide abundance of "Creative" judges, both State and Federal.

I certainly don't know the particulars of the local governmental problems of the Omaha. It seems there are similar problems with several Nations popping up across the country.

For many years I have wondered why "We" as a people (all the recognized tribes) have not been able to come together and fight for our rights, such as self determination and use of lands, en masse, as other ethnicities have done in our Country. We just can't seem to maintain an organized inter-tribal "National Front" for the good of all.

Maybe it has something to do with our distinct "Individualistic" natures, which were apparently amplified through the eons before European contact.

Maybe it has something to do with the importance of Sacrifice being stripped from our traditional moral fabric and replaced with the concepts of ownership and materialism. Once again, I'm reminded of the haunting oration by Leonard Peltier in the Robby Robertson song 'Sacrifice.' "If I have to sacrifice some more until my people are free, I will sacrifice some more."

Perhaps it's the defeatism and victimization experienced and possibly amplified through many generations of reservation life comparable to the poverty and corruption of a third world dictatorship, yet in the midst of "The Land of Plenty."

I honestly don't have even a suggestion. It's easy for me to type "Find a strong leader willing to take the heat of compromise to obtain an acceptable solution," when you're in the midst of "Pot Stirrers," just waiting to sling accusations and reminders of prior problems in whichever directions will serve them, or relinquish their power to negotiate to our over-loaded court system in the hopes "their side" will emerge victorious, and vindicated.

These are empty words, but they are all I have. You are not alone. Historically, we have sacrificed and yet survived through much worse. The Omaha will survive this too.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/03/08 03:42 AM

Vance, I need to send you one of my refrigerator magnets. It says "Custer had it coming!" History has pretty much proved his ambitions and that he ignored orders, which resulted in the deaths of himself and his men. Somewhere I read of his memorial being urinated on as a rite of passage. Maybe that is in 'Coyote Blue' a work of fiction. But there are always some kernels of truth in fiction. The "truth" of Custer has made it's way out, and I feel he has become a historical footnote. Custer wanted to be a hero, did something stupid and got shot.

On the other hand, Black Elk's teachings and prophecies continue to be discovered and studied to this day. Maybe they have yet to reach their full impact and fulfillment. He and his People were not defeated by Custer and the rest of the US Calvary, they were immortalized, and their descendants are still here.

OK, so I had lunch with my Tribal Chief today, and I'm feeling a bit "Native." But Custer did have it coming :-)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/03/08 03:22 PM

It must have one fine lunch, Icp! grin
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/03/08 04:57 PM

It surely was, and the Chief paid! I was truly fortunate to be there when he and the Vice Chief of another tribe returned from the State capitol. We have 3 pieces of legislation in process and all 3 moved forward yesterday. There was even an AP reporter there. We're scraping and clawing, but we are making some progress in South Carolina.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 04/14/08 04:26 PM

I love the following prayer.

Traditional Native American Prayer:

O Great Spirit,
whose voice I hear in the winds,
and whose breath gives life to all the world
-hear me-
I come before you, one of your children.
I am small and weak.
I need your strength and wisdom.
Let me walk in beauty and make my eyes
ever behold
the red and purple sunset.
Make my hands respect the things you
have made,
my ears sharp to hear your voice.
Make me wise, so that I may know the
things you have taught my People.
The lessons you have hidden in every
leaf and rock.
I seek strength not to be superior to my
brothers,
but to be able to fight my greatest
enemy, myself.
Make me ever ready to come to you,
with clean hands and straight eyes,
so when life fades as a fading sunset,
my spirit may come to you without shame.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 04/16/08 06:55 PM

it is a very beautiful prayer, phyllis. with your permission,
i shall print and place it on my desk to say each day.

please excuse the looks of this.....i have broken my right wrist and typing with a few 'wrong' fingers is, um, different. -grin-

i did want to stop by to see how our campfire was burning.....
just a flicker i see, but i am encouraged that it has not gone out.

until another time: wakan tanan kici un, may the Great Spirit bless you.

nayeli,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 04/16/08 07:45 PM

laugh Kimi Kaya - how nice to hear from you! I am sorry about your wrist, I send you blessings for quick healing. Are you in any pain? I made a great herbal rub for pain and swellings, it is 1 oz each of rosemary, bay and eucalyptus and 1/4 oz lobelia (dried herbs), soak in 16 oz rubbing alchohol for two weeks, turning gently once or twice a day, then strain. I use it for arthritis pain and swelling and sprains.

I hope you come back again soon to add to our campfire with your wonderful stories and information. We miss you!

Take care. smile
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 04/16/08 07:48 PM

Kimi Kaya - Of course you may print and use the prayer - it was written for all of us. I say it often and it brings me great peace. smile

wakan tanan kici un, may the Great Spirit bless you, my friend

Wado!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/18/08 08:52 PM

Just bringing this back up front after postings of PowWows
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 04/19/08 07:27 PM

haw le mita cola, phyllis,

i thank you for your kind words and blessing.

thank you also for your 'recipe' for the herbal rub. yes, the pain is still quite bothersome, however i shall be casted for another two weeks, but after that the rub should be very helpful.....if i am able to procure the herbs.

i came upon a beautiful paragraph this morning that i would like to share with all here around the campfire.

~ Indian's pictures last forever. ~

A woodland path is good medicine for a weary walker. Soft, rolling steps along the path do not interrupt the harmony of the woods. Even the snort of the doe before she bounds away is to tell her fawn to lie low. Many pauses give time to hear and see in detail the call of a busy titmouse and the high-pitched whistle of the finch. This is Cherokee paradise - to stand quietly in aged timber and be so much a part of it. Even the tiny creek plays water-harps as it winds its way around clumps of dried leaves and slips over round stones that are a part of its past handiwork. This is a green cathedral with shafts of sunlight cutting through thick foliage to turn droplets of water into prisms of color. Nothing is out of place - not even the walker. INDIAN GUIDE, PIPESTONE CREEK 1882

wah doh Ogedoda (we give thanks Great Spirit)
amba,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 04/19/08 07:39 PM

smile The woodland walk words are beautiful Kimi - thank you so much for sharing that.

I get my herbs from an herbalist locally here. I really shopped around first and have complete confidence in his methods and herbs. They are always dried properly, clean and never too old. His shop is immaculate and everything stored in glass jars behind his counter so only he can open and get out the herbs. I would gather them myself if I could, but I do have trust in this herbalist. The herbal rub I make is wonderful for aches and pains and makes me feel relaxed and cared for when I use it.

I hope you feel better and heal quickly.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/26/08 02:55 AM

Come on over to the campfire, friends. Our campfire needs new stories and new logs to keep it burning brightly. Have any special stories, songs, prayers, myths, legends of Native American origin? We would love to hear them! All are welcome and may the Great Spirit bless all who gather round the fire. Let us take turns sharing and caring.

And please - this is a place for PEACE! If you have any issues that may bring on debates then please post it in it's own thread. The campfire is a place to relax and be with friends. smile

Cherokee Travelers Greeting

I will draw thorns from your feet.
We will walk the White Path of Life together.
Like a brother of my own blood,
I will love you.
I will wipe tears from your eyes.
When you are sad,
I will put your aching heart to rest.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place... - 04/26/08 03:09 AM

The Four Winds

We are all thankful to the powers we know as the Four Winds. We hear their voices in the moving air as they refresh us and purify the air we breathe. They help to bring the change of seasons. From the four directions they come, bringing us messages and giving us strength. With one mind, we send our greetings and thanks to the Four Winds.


Posted By: Wendy Tall One

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/26/08 12:02 PM

Crazy question...whatever happened to the Lakota secession from the US?

Note from Moderator of this forum: Thanks, Wendy, for bringing up this question for it is an interesting subject. I ask that anyone who wishes to comment on this subject do so in the thread titled "The Lakota Secession". Thank you. :)Phyllis Doyle Burns.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/26/08 04:56 PM

Ok, my friends - please let us keep this thread titled "The Hello Place" as a place for everyone to come, relax, and find Peace in sharing with friends. I like to see songs, prayers, stories, legends, myths here at the campfire - all related to Native American Peoples. If you have any discussion that might turn into debate or differences, please start another post - do not bring it to the campfire.

I am going to put the above question into it's own thread and title the post The Lakota Secession - I would like to do this because it seems like an interesting subject but, may take us away from the purpose of the campfire gathering. Thanks.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/28/08 03:22 PM

May the warm winds of heaven
blow softly upon your house.
May the great spirit bless
all who enter there.
May your moccasins make
happy tracks in many snows.
And may the rainbow
always touch your shoulder.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/28/08 03:40 PM

smile Welcome to the Campfire! This is a place where we get together, away from the debatable subjects, and share Native American stories, prayers, legends, myths and just relax and introduce ourselves. So, bring some sticks or a log and a story with you to add to the fire that burns within all of us and share with others. Please help us keep the campfire burning brightly.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/30/08 03:29 PM

The Earth Mother

We are all thankful to our Mother, the Earth, for she gives us all that we need for life. She supports our feet as we walk about upon her. It gives us joy that she continues to care for us as she has from the beginning of time. To our Mother, we send greetings and thanks.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/02/08 01:15 AM

"Everyone has their own identity and they have their own purpose in this world, and they have ways of finding out that identity and carrying out that purpose. No one should interfere with that."

"Without self determination and self direction, anyone is lost."


Rolling Thunder, Shosshone/Cherokee Spiritual Leader. medicine man, a healer, teacher, activist and lecturer.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 05/11/08 09:20 PM

Pilamaya, Phyllis, for your kind words.

I am feeling better and the wrist is healing. The cast was removed this week and I am now able to type, although a bit painfully, with two hands. It seems that is also good therapy!

I am in the process of making a 'medicine wheel'. Have spent many hours researching and have learned so much. Finding the stones presented a bit of a problem, so in my first attempt, I used shells. I thought since they were 'natural' it would be ok.

I am not too pleased, however. But during my second search for stones, I did much better. It seemed like the stones I did not find the first time.....suddenly appeared! My ultimate goal is to get semi-precious stones.

This really has been a wonderful experience for me! One Native American Elder said that just the searching was a healing experience. I would have to agree.

So, dear Phyllis, if you have anything to add, such as prayers, or really anything, I would be grateful to receive any help you can offer.

Oh yes, my sage is nearly dry enough for the smudging. That would be my first step after completion, correct?

Walk in the Light until our paths cross again.
nayeli,
kimikaya

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/12/08 01:41 AM

Kimi, Hi Dear Friend!

I am happy to hear you are healing. May Great Spirit guide you on your path of healing and also in making your medicine wheel. I have a friend at Prairie's Edge Trading Post who might be able to help you find some stones for the prayer wheel:

Prairie Edge Trading Post
Michael Lekberg
prairie1@rushmore.com

It is wise to thank Great Spirit for every item you put in your medicine wheel. Ken "Black Hawk" Cohen has written a wonderful book called "Native American Healing; Honor the Medicine". He gives some really good info and helpful tips on the sacredness of healing herbs, stones and ceremonoies.

Each of us is given spirit gifts (totems) at birth to help us discover our path on the "Good Red Road." You can define your path and serve yourself and others while enjoying the trip, for the journey is more important than the destination. All members of creation - animals, plants and minerals - have unique characteristics, energies and lessons giving you direction. Your path consists of the gifts of those with whom you share the Earth combined with your choices and spiritual energies

When you smudge your medicine wheel, you can also use cedar. I always use sage because I prefer the aroma and it is sacred, as is cedar. You probably already know this, but remember to offer the smoke to the four directions with prayer, smudge your medicine wheel and yourself, bathe in the smoke as you pray.

May your moccasins and your heart always find the happy path.
Blessings and walk in peace and beauty, Kimi. smile
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/12/08 04:09 PM

One of my favorite prayers sent out to those who need it:

Great Spirit Prayer

"Oh, Great Spirit, whose voice I hear in the wind,
Whose breath gives life to all the world.
Hear me; I need your strength and wisdom.
Let me walk in beauty, and make my eyes ever behold the red and purple sunset.
Make my hands respect the things you have made and my ears sharp to hear your voice
Make me wise so that I may understand the things you have taught my people.
Help me to remain calm and strong in the face of all that comes towards me.
Let me learn the lessons you have hidden in every leaf and rock.
Help me seek pure thoughts and act with the intention of helping others.
Help me find compassion without empathy overwhelming me.
I seek strength, not to be greater than my brother, but to fight my greatest enemy

Myself.

Make me always ready to come to you with clean hands and straight eyes.
So when life fades, as the fading sunset, my spirit may come to you without shame.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place - 05/12/08 07:42 PM

Check out this link to a Native American Prayer song

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Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place - 05/12/08 07:47 PM

Here is one for the Ghost Dance. The music is awesome in it.

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Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/12/08 09:20 PM

Vance, I love these links! I want to get that music for the Ghost Dance and the video - that really is awesome!!!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 05/16/08 05:54 PM

I, too, loved the links, Vance! As Phyllis said the music was 'kili'! (awesome) Pila Mita!

Le Mita Cola, Phyllis, I thank you so much for the information.
Especially the prayer. I have a small collection of prayers for my Medicine Wheel and shall include yours.

I was unable to locate the book you recommended at Amazon. Out of print, I would guess. However, there were several others that interested me which I may purchase.

Twice I have gone back to your note, Phyllis, and lost what I had written here.....so, I'll not do that again! And I just know I'm going to forget what I wanted to reply to. *grin*

I do know of my totem. I have studied it and learned much about myself just from that. I found it fascinating and believe we could all benefit from reading and learning about our totems.

My sage is ready for smudging, although my Medicine Wheel is not.
I have put one together that I am not too pleased with it and since I have not yet smudged it, I feel it is not 'real'. Does that make sense? I feel that in each step I make during this process, I am gaining Blessings from the Great Spirit. I do hope this is true.

Until another time, I offer:
Wakan Tanan Kici Un to all my friends here; May The Great Spirit Bless You.

nayeli,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/22/08 01:25 AM

Originally Posted By: kimikaya

I was unable to locate the book you recommended at Amazon. Out of print, I would guess. However, there were several others that interested me which I may purchase.


Hi Kimi,

I got the name of the book wrong, sorry - frown
The correct title is:

Honoring the Medicine: The Essential Guide to Native American Healing (Paperback)
by Ken Cohen (Author)

You can find it at the end of my article titled: Healing The Spirit, or you can go directly to Amazon.com to find it. I highly reccommend it for anyone interested in the Native American ways of healing - Cohen covers so much in this book in great detail. I check it out of the library often and have finally decided to buy my own copy because I refer to it often. It is well worth studying and a good read.

Blessings to you.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/22/08 01:29 AM

Vance, I am going to get that music to listen to when I am writing my articles - it is so inspiring!

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, May the Great Spirit bless you. (I am learning some great things from Kimi.)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/24/08 09:48 PM

"Sometimes dreams are wiser than waking."

Black Elk
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/26/08 10:21 PM

Every achievement starts with a dream.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 05:37 PM

Doe Ksh Kay Va Oun Hey, Phillis (How are you?),

I just wanted to say that I have completed my Medicine Wheel.
It was a very pleasant experience in doing the reasearch.....
I have learned much.

I also made a booklet of prayers, adding the Native American Code of Ethics, because I thought it was important to read often.
Very wise words!

I included some graphics and that was a bit of a challenge as I was using both sides of the paper, and in half.
Anyway, I am proud of how it came out. So much so, that I sent a copy to my Dear Spirit Sister. I am waiting to see what she thinks! *grin*

As per your suggestion, Phyllis, I smudged myself along with the Medicine Wheel. I feel it, and I, are now ready for the Great Spirit to listen and accept my prayers. Pila Mita, Phyllis.

Is it not past time for someone here around the campfire to tell a story, lore, poem or prayer?
Or, has everyone left.....?

Wakan Tanan Kici Un!
Nayeli,
Kimi Kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 07:44 PM

laugh Kimi, how very exciting and inspirational for you to have completed your Medicine Wheel. I am very impressed and you have motivated me to try creating one for myself. And the booklet of prayers is a wonderful treasure to keep - this really makes me feel inspired. Thank you so much for your Spirit and example. I am sure your Spirit Sister will be extremely proud and happy. smile

Yes, it is time for some more stories or lores. I will enter one and try to get Vance over here to post something - he is a very good storyteller. Can you post the Code of Ethics for us?

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, Dear Friend.





Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:18 PM

I love the Creation stories, here is one from the Choctaw People:

Grandmother Spider Steals the Fire
(Creation story of the
Choctaw People of Tennessee and Mississippi)

The Choctaw People say that when the People first came-up out of the ground, People were encased in cocoons, their eyes closed, their limbs folded tightly to their bodies. And this was true of all People, the Bird People, the Animal People, the Insect People, and the Human People. The Great Spirit took pity on them and sent down someone to unfold their limbs, dry them off, and open their eyes. But the opened eyes saw nothing, because the world was dark, no sun, no moon, not even any stars. All the People moved around by touch, and if they found something that didn't eat them first, they ate it raw, for they had no fire to cook it.

All the People met in a great Pow-wow, with the Animal and Bird People taking the lead, and the Human People hanging back. The Animal and Bird People decided that dark was not good, but cold and miserable. A solution must be found!!! Someone spoke from the dark, "I have heard that the people in the East have fire". This caused a stir of wonder, "What could fire be"!!! There was a general discussion, and it was decided that if, as-rumor-had-it, fire was warm and gave light, they should have it too. Another voice said, "But the people of the East are too greedy to share with us". So it was decided that the Bird and Animal People should steal what they needed, the fire!!!

But, who should have the honor!!! Grandmother Spider volunteered, "I can do it!!! Let me try"!!! But at the same time, Opossum began to speak. "I, Opossum, am a great Chief of the animals. I will go to the East and since I am a great hunter, I will take the fire and hide it in the bushy hair on my tail". It was well know that Opossum had the furriest tail of all the animals, so he was selected.

When Opossum came to the East... he soon found the beautiful-red-fire jealously guarded by the people of the East. But Opossum got closer and closer until he picked up a small piece of burning wood, and stuck it in the hair of his tail, which promptly began to smoke, then flame. The people of the East said, "Look, that Opossum has stolen our fire"!!! They took it and put it back where it came from and drove Opossum away. Poor Opossum!!! Every bit of hair had burned from his tail, and to this day, Opossums have no hair at all on their tails.

Once again, the Pow-wow had to find a volunteer Chief. Grandmother Spider again said, "Let me go!!! I can do it"!!! But this time a bird was elected, Buzzard. Buzzard was very proud. "I can succeed where Opossum has failed. I will fly to the East on my great wings, then hide the stolen fire in the beautiful long feathers on my head". The birds and animals still did not understand the nature of fire. So Buzzard flew to the East on his powerful wings, swooped past those defending the fire, picked up a small piece of burning ember, and hid it in his head feathers. Buzzard's head began to smoke and flame even faster!!! The people of the East said, "Look!!! Buzzard has stolen the fire"!!! And they took it and put it back where it came from. Poor Buzzard!!! His head was now bare of feathers, red and blistered looking. And to this day, buzzards have naked heads that are bright-red and blistered.

The Pow-wow now sent Crow to look the situation over, for Crow was very clever. Crow at-that-time was pure white, and had the sweetest singing voice of all the birds. But he took so long standing over the fire, trying to find the perfect piece to steal that his white feathers were smoked black. And he breathed so much smoke that when he tried to sing, out came a harsh, Caw!!! Caw!!!

The Council said, "Opossum has failed. Buzzard and Crow have failed. Who shall we send"!!!

Tiny Grandmother Spider shouted with all her might, "LET ME TRY IT PLEASE"!!! Though the council members thought Grandmother Spider had little chance of success, it was agreed that she should have her turn. Grandmother Spider looked-then like she looks-now, she had a small torso suspended by two sets of legs that turned the other way. She walked on all of her wonderful legs toward a stream where she had found clay. With those legs, she made a tiny clay container and a lid that fit perfectly with a tiny notch for air in the corner of the lid. Then she put the container on her back, spun-a-web all the way to the East, and walked tip-toe until she came to the fire. She was so small, the people from the East took no notice. She took a tiny piece of fire, put it in the container, and covered it with the lid. Then she walked back on tip-toe along the web until she came to the People. Since they couldn't see any fire, they said, "Grandmother Spider has failed"!!!

"Oh No", she said, "I have the fire"!!! She lifted the pot from her back, and the lid from the pot, and the fire flamed up into its friend, the air. All the Birds and Animal People began to decide who would get this wonderful warmth. Bear said, "I'll take it"!!! but then he burned his paws on it and decided fire was not for animals... for look what happened to Opossum!!!

The Birds wanted no part of it, as Buzzard and Crow were still nursing their wounds. The insects thought it was pretty, but they too, stayed far away from the fire.

Then a small voice said, "We will take it, if Grandmother Spider will help". The timid humans, whom none of the animals or birds thought much of, were volunteering!!!

So Grandmother Spider taught the Human People how to feed the fire with sticks and wood to keep it from dying, how to keep the fire safe in a circle-of-stone so it couldn't escape and hurt them or their homes. While she was at it, she taught the humans about pottery made of clay and fire, and about weaving and spinning, at which Grandmother Spider was an expert.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:40 PM

Whatever you do in life,
do the very best you can
with your mind, heart and spirit.

Kimi has shown us, with the creation of her Medicine Wheel and the struggle she had with it while healing from a broken wrist, that to put your heart into it will result in success. Thanks for the inspiration, Kimi.
Posted By: Eng Culture Nicola Jane

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:40 PM

good story Phyllis, But I am still afraid of Spiders!
I had always wondered why Buzzards were bald....
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:42 PM

Hi Nicola! Nice to hear from you. My daughter is afraid of spiders also - what is that called? aracnaphopia or something like that?
Posted By: Eng Culture Nicola Jane

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:48 PM

yep it is. I tried to stop my fear by letting a tarantula crawl up my arm, but I knew it had failed when I nearly cracked my head open escaping from a money spider 20 minutes later LOL!
Posted By: Eng Culture Nicola Jane

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 08:50 PM

Also Hi to you! I missed being here. I have been really poorly medically. also trying to balance time editing, working,family and found the forums were taking hours out of my day, so as much as I love them, i've slowed down!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 09:22 PM

I do hope you are feeling much better, Nicola. Take care of yourself - that is so important!
Posted By: Trish-D

Re: The Hello Place - 05/28/08 09:26 PM

Hello everyone,

Just taking a seat at the campfire. Thanks for opening your circle.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 05/29/08 01:18 AM

Our circle is open to all who would like to join us. Thank you, Trish for coming in. Did you bring some "sticks" (stories or legends) for the fire? You are most welcome anytime to just relax or tell a Native American story or legend or comment.

I love your quote from John Lennon - that is so true!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 05/30/08 12:35 AM

Greetings Campfire 'Sitters',

A Warm Welcome to you, Nicola! Very nice to have a friend from 'over the pond' join us.

I would much prefer coming across a snake than a spider. But, after reading your excellent tale, Phyllis, I shall look at them in a bit different manner.....if I have to look at them at all!
However, I do not consider myself having 'arachnophobia'.
(you were very close, Phyllis! *hehe*).

I thank you for your kind words, le mita cola. In what way can I inspire you further? How can I help you? It would please me much to see you complete a Medicine Wheel. It need not be too involved.

A bit about mine to show you how simplistic it is: Last summer there was work done on our septic tank, which left many rocks/stones exposed or just under the surface. I collected many 'batches' of these, soaked them in a bleach/soap solution, did a little scrubbing and then dried them.

Originally, I wanted to purchase semi-precious stones in the colors I needed, but soon found out that that was going to be a bit pricey. Plan "b" was the rocks! *giggles*

Non of the rocks were bigger than 2 1/2" in length and those were my four Sacred Directions. Green (center), black, red, white and yellow. I happened to have a little green box turtle figurine that I used for the center. Next is the seven stones in the inner circle, representing the colors of the rainbow. And finally, are the twelve month stones. The 'spokes' of the wheel are the smallest and they are natural. I used markers to "paint" the rocks. Nearly all have a flat surface and that is what I painted.

I have a round concrete table w/three benches under a large Oak tree in my yard. In the center of the table is where I placed the Medicine Wheel. Very simple and 'natural'. After I read a few prayers from my booket, this is where I read my Bible. That is something that I have never done. When I am out there.....
a feeling of Peace comes over me. And I feel the Great Spirit's Smile and His Blessings.

Phyllis, I lost your 'private' email addy in my last crash.
If you would please send it to - ****************** - I would like to send you a photo of an elaborate and lovely wheel that someone from Canada put in his yard. Puts my little endeavor to shame *grin*, but the Great Spirit, I am sure, does not grant him anymore than he grants me!

May you walk in the Light till our paths cross again.
Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya

P.S. I will be happy to post the Code of Ethics at another time. I am into the second day of a cold/flu, and need to rest now.

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 06/02/08 07:20 PM

I am so pleased to welcome you to our campfire, Trish! I hope that more join us and accept the 'talking stick'.

I would like to offer:

NATIVE AMERICAN CODE OF ETHICS

Rise with the sun to pray. Pray alone. Pray often. The Great
Spirit will listen, if you only speak.

Be tolerant of those who are lost on their path. Ignorance, conceit, anger, jealousy and greed stem from a lost soul. Pray that they will find guidance.

Search for yourself, by yourself. Do not allow others to make your path for you. It is your road, and yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you.

Treat the guests in your home with much consideraton. Serve them the best food, give them the best bed and treat them with respect and honor.

Do not take what is not yours whether from a person, a community, the wilderness or from a culture. It was not earned nor given. It is not yours.

Respect all things that are placed upon this earth--whether it be people, animal or plant. Honor the Spirit in all things.

Honor other people's thoughts, wishes and words. Never interrupt another or mock or rudey mimic them. Allow each person the right to personal expression.

Never speak of others in a bad way. The negative energy that you put out into the universe will multiply when it returns to you. All persons make mistakes. And all mistakes can be forgiven. Bad thoughts cause illness of the mind, body and spirit. Practice optimism.

Nature is not FOR us, it is a PART of us. They are part of your worldly family.

Children are the seeds of our future. Plant love in their hearts and water them with wisdom and life's lessons. When they are grown, give them space to grow.

Avoid hurting the hearts of others. The poison of your pain will return to you.

Be truthful at all times. Honesty is the test of ones will within this universe.

Keep yourself balanced. Your mental self, spiritual self, emotional self, and physical self--all need to be strong, pure and healthy. Work out the body to strengthen the mind. Grow rich in spirit to cure emotional ails.

Make conscious decisions as to who you will be and how you will react. Be responsible for your own actions.

Respect the privacy and personal space of others. Do not touch the personal property of others--especially sacred and religious objects. This is forbidden.

Be true to yourself first. You cannot nurture and help others if you cannot nurture and help yourself first.

Respect others religious beliefs. Do not force your belief on others.

Share your good fortune with others. Participate in charity. Be willing to give back to the people, so that People will live.


Just think what this wonderful world of ours would be like if only we would all practice these words.....

I see that there are many 'talking sticks' stacked here beside our campfire. I would like to pass one to each of you, with the hopes that they will be accepted.

As the sun goes down and a full moon begins to appear, the fire dims a bit.....and it's the perfect time for 'ghost stories'! *grin*

Wah doh Ogedoda.
Walk in the Light till our paths cross again.
nayeli,
kimi kaya


Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 06/02/08 09:24 PM

Kimi Kaya,

Thank you so much for the directions to make a medicine wheel. Ken Cohen, in his book, gave the same instructions. So, guess I will get started on mine. Your medicine wheel sounds really nice - and what a wonderful place to put it, I bet it is very peaceful in your little spot.

It is not the size of the medicine wheel so much as what is in the heart - Great Spirit sees and knows this and looks tenderly on you, because He knows what is in your heart.

I cannot give out my personal email in public, that would just invite spam from all sources. You can send me a private message thru this forum and send the picture there also. If you do not mind, I will delete your email address from the post you made so it will not get picked up by someone you do not wish to have it. Since this is a public forum and goes on the internet, all manners of sites and people can pick it up and you might get a lot of spam.

Take care and blessings to you, my friend. May Great Spirit always let you walk in the light, peace and beauty.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 06/02/08 09:33 PM

Thank you, Kimi, for posting the Code of Ethics. How very nice to be reminded of these wonderful and truthful thoughts. Everyone should post this on their wall where they can see it every morning.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place - 06/02/08 09:43 PM

Need a prayer? Need to send a prayer? Visit our Prayer Circle and Kiva where all are welcome.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un
May Great Spirit bless you.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/06/08 10:05 PM

The white buffalo is a gift to the hearts of all people.

What does the White Buffalo mean to you?
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/06/08 10:10 PM

It means nightmares to me. (Thinking about the movie with Charles Bronson)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/06/08 10:29 PM

I never saw that movie. Isn't that about Buffalo Bill, and he had nightmares about the white buffalo and tried to hunt it down? I like Charles Bronson, but I do not think I would like that movie.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/07/08 03:58 AM

I love stories of Coyote!

What are your favorite "trickster" stories?
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/08/08 05:43 AM

Well, its not really a favorite story but it was a true life event that led me to finding out that coyote means Trickster" in Native American language.

Trickster is also a name for the devil.

A family from our church had just adopted a pair of twin girls. I am not sure of their ages but they were under a year old. They have two children of their own as well.

On one Sunday at our church, the couple was recognized publicly during both services for their work in the Lord as they were very busy with the church. Their babies were dedicated to the Lord and the whole family was prayed over and blessed.

The husband had the next day off from work. On Tuesday, the day after, he was on his way to work at 4am. He was riding his motorcycle and a coyote ran out in front of him. They collided and the man flew off of his back, hit his head on the road and was instantly killed.

His first day back to work after the blessing from the church family and the babies being dedicated by the Lord, he was killed.

I was then told by a Native American friend of mine who goes to our church, that coyote means Trickster.

Thats really the only coyote story I have.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/08/08 06:09 PM

Coyote is one of the Native American 'Tricksters' and in many myths that have been created over the generations. Raven is a top runner-up to Coyote. Iktome is also a trickster and is in many tales with Coyote and others.

My newest article, coming out tomorrow, gives a brief history and explanation of 'tricksters'. The article is titled "Symbolic Myths Of The Native American".
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/09/08 12:30 PM

Hello again from Finland
I have little funny ask for you.
My Rabbit did get little bunnies and
I would like to get for they Native American names.
When bunnies are so big that I could take photos of them
I would like to get some names for you if that would be ok.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/09/08 04:10 PM

Originally Posted By: KatjaP
Hello again from Finland
I have little funny ask for you.
My Rabbit did get little bunnies and
I would like to get for they Native American names.
When bunnies are so big that I could take photos of them
I would like to get some names for you if that would be ok.


Native Americans usually call animals by their proper names with a title in front of it - such as: Brother Rabbit, Sister Rabbit, etc. I realize you may have several rabbits so just be creative, like by putting a name in front of 'Rabbit'.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/10/08 02:40 PM

KatjaP,

I just wrote an article on Native American myths and stories. You might enjoy it. It is titled "Symbolic Myths Of The Native American" and you can find it at the following link:

BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/11/08 12:21 PM

Thank you for the link.

I just wondred is that stupid if I named my little rabbits in your language numbers?
I want little bit different name that finnish name, so think is that ok?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/11/08 04:32 PM

Sure!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/11/08 06:10 PM

So - Katja, what will their names be? I am curious. How many rabbits do you have now? smile
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/12/08 02:20 AM

I havethe moms. One have 7 babies and another 4 babies. These 4 I think that I named for your language.
First babies photosBellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/12/08 04:00 PM

They sure are cute little babies. Bet they will grow fast.

I love floppy-ear bunnies.

Thank you for sharing the pictures.
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/13/08 02:56 PM

Yes, they grow so fast,
In first page have now new photos of little bunnies.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/13/08 03:12 PM

www.babynames.com

If you go to the link above, you can find some Native American names and their meanings - like the name Olathe, which means 'so lovely'. When you put your cursor on the name, a box will come up that tells you the meaning of the name and the origin.

When you get to the main page at the link, scroll down to "names by origin" and highlight "Native American". This will give you lots and lots of names!
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/14/08 04:43 AM

Oh, thank you a lot! I think that my day goes here in this page!
Have you some stories about rabbit?
I would like to hear some rabbit sories
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/14/08 07:06 PM

KatjaP,

There are two darling tales of Rabbit I found at a really neat web site.

"How Rabbit Brought Fire to the People" smile

"How Rabbit Lost His Tail" smile

There are a few others also you might like to read.

at:

Native American Lore Index
... to several stories of Native American Indian Lore ... 39. Eagle Stories. 40. Rabbit and Fox. 41. Grandfather Stories. 42. California Creation Lore Yokut ...
www.ilhawaii.net/~stony/loreindx.html

www.ilhawaii.net/~stony/loreindx.html

Click on the link then just scroll down until you find the lore you want to read.



grin
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/19/08 04:29 PM

Here is one of my favorite pictures of rabbits. You can get free pictures like this from freefoto.com

www.freefoto.com/tag/rabbits

Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/23/08 01:53 PM

more photos of baby rabbits
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Posted By: "Rosie"

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/23/08 02:24 PM

I had a beautiful black rabbit named Christoper, he was truly my best friend. He used a litter box, would jump up on the sofa when i was watching watch tv. and sleep on my lap. we shared my bed. he was so lovable. Christopher ate some sheet rock, the vet couldn't save him. I was very sad when i had to have him put to sleep ;o(
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/23/08 02:28 PM

Rosie, I bet you really miss your rabbit.

Just to get back on track here, smile does anyone have a Native American tale or legend they would like to share with us?

I will add some more sticks to the campfire with one in a little while.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place - 06/25/08 08:21 PM

Greetings Everyone,

I am sure that many of us are vacationing and much too busy to just 'hang out' here around the campfire. But come Fall and cooler weather, I'm hoping we can get back to sharing stories, legends and.....toasted marshmallows. *grin*

I would like to post one version of table grace and ask if anyone has other versions they would like to share.

Indian Table Grace

Now I am about to eat, O Great Spirit. Give my thanks to the beasts and the birds whom you have provided for my hunger and
pray deliver my sorrow that living things must sacrifice for my
comfort and well-being. Let the feather of corn spring up in
its time and let it not wither but make full grains for the fires
of our cooking pots. Now I am about to eat.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/26/08 12:23 AM

How Antelope Stole the Moon

There was an Indian village down near the place where the sun sets. The people there had the moon.

Other Indians wanted to go and steal the moon and put it back up. They were going to hide and try to steal it. The Indians who had it knew the others were coming to get the moon. They were going to run after them and kill them.

Then two antelope came and decided they would steal the moon. They knew they were so fast the people wouldn't be able to catch them. They stole the moon, and sure enough, the people couldn't keep up because the antelope ran so fast.

When the antelope came to the other village they put the moon outside a teepee and went in. Coyote heard about it and ran out and saw the moon outside by the teepee. He took the moon and ran away with it.

The antelope heard him, and they ran after Coyote as he raced toward the river. They were going to catch Coyote, but he gave the moon a mighty heave and threw it in the pool below the falls in the Spokane River.
It is still there.


(Inland Northwest - Spokane)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/30/08 03:40 PM

I was up in the Sierra mountains with my Mom and brother a few days ago and we saw the most beautiful sight. 40 - 50 Golden Eagles were soaring above us near a lake. I get excited when I see one or two eagles, but to have seen so many at once was just so awe inspiring. I thought about the Native American way of life prior to European contact and wondered how significant this sight would have been to a tribe living in that area and what it would have meant to them. It was like stepping back in time. I felt so close to nature and so at peace - it was wonderful!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/30/08 07:45 PM

Ya Ta Say,

I was so surprised to find this other 'campfire' today. And to see that it was started back in February.

What a fantastic experience for you, Phyllis! I would say it was a once-in-a-life-time experience. I am sure the Native Americans would have thought it significant, as well, then and now. I, too, wonder in just what way.....

I would like to offer "The Eagle" from the book LAKOTA LIFE.

The eagle is a "winged" symbol for the Lakota people. It is the strongest and bravest of all the birds. For this reason, the eagle and its feathers have been chosen as a symbol of what is highest, bravest, strongest and holiest. It's feathers are given to another to honor them and they are worn with dignity and pride. They are treated with great respect and when one is dropped during a dance, a special ceremony is performed to pick it up again and the owner of it is careful never to drop it again.

It is also used to adorn the sacred pipe because it is a symbol of the Great Spirit who is above all and from whom all strength and power comes.

Eagle feathers or wings are used in special ways. When they are held over someone's head this means that the person is brave or that he is wished bravery or happiness. To wave it over everyone present is meant that everyone is wished peace, happiness, prosperity and a desire to help them get these things.

"Those who trust in God for help, will find their strength renewed. They will rise on wings like eagles, and they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not grow weak".
Isaiah 40:31

I am so glad that you shared your wonderful experience with us, Phyllis. Also, I had a wonderful time going back to the beginning and reading all the great stories. Pilamaya Vance and Phyllis.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/30/08 07:56 PM

Ya Ta Say, Kimi Kaya.

How nice to hear from you.

Yes, the eagle experience was wonderful. We hardly spoke to each other at all, we were so happy to just watch the majestic beauties.

Years ago, my younger brother had a dream that was very profound. He was managing a trading post at the time of some good friends of ours. One night he dreamed that he was walking along the coast by the trading post when a huge eagle flew over him, circled and came back, then dropped a feather which landed right in front of my brother. He carefully picked it up then the eagle came down, picked up my brother and took him over to the trading post. Our friends, when they heard about the dream were very impressed and treated my brother from that time on as a member of their family.

It was a very symbolic dream.

Thank you so much for sharing the Eagle information with us. That is very spiritual and significant, very nice.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, my friend.
Phyllis
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/30/08 07:58 PM

We have not heard from Vance here for awhile. He has been really busy with a second site to manage. Hope he comes back here soon to share a story with us.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/01/08 09:59 PM

Ya Ta Say,

That is quite an interesting and profound dream your brother had, Phyllis. I would love to hear an Elder's interpretation.

If you do not mind more talk to Eagles, I would like to offer a Lumbee legend.

The Symbolism of the Eagle Feather
Lumbee
In the beginning, the Great Spirit above gave to the animals and birds wisdom and knowledge and the power to talk to men. He sent these creatures to tell man that he showed himself through them. They would teach a chosen man sacred songs and dance, as well as, much ritual and lore.
The creature most loved by the Great Spirit was the eagle, for he tells the story of life. The Eagle, as you know, has only two eggs, and all living things in the world are divided into two. Here is man and woman, male and female and this is true with animals, birds, trees, flowers and so on. All things have children of two kinds so that life may continue.

Man has two eyes, two hands, two feet and he has a body and soul, substance and shadow. Through his eyes, he sees pleasant and unpleasant scenes, through his nostrils he smells good and bad odors, with his ears he hears joyful news and words that make him sad. His mind is divided between good and evil. His right hand he may often use for evil, such as war or striking a person in anger. But his left hand, which is near his heart, is always full of kindness. His right foot may lead him in the wrong path, but his left foot always leads him the right way, and so it goes; he has daylight and darkness, summer and winter, peace and war, and life and death.

In order to remember this lesson of life, look to the great eagle, the favorite bird of the Great Spirit. The eagle feather is divided into two parts, part light, and part dark. This represents daylight and darkness, summer and winter, peace and war, and life and death.

So that you may remember what I have told you, look well on the eagle, for his feathers, too, tell the story of life. Look at the feathers I wear upon my hand, the one on the right is large and perfect and is decorated; this represents man. The one on my left is small and plain; this represents woman. The eagle feather is divided into two parts, dark and white. This represents daylight and darkness, summer and winter. For the white tells of summer, when all is bright and the dark represents the dark days of winter.

My children, remember what I tell you. For it is YOU who will choose the path in life you will follow -- the good way, or the wrong way.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/02/08 04:21 PM

Kimi - how wonderful - thank you. smile
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/10/08 05:47 PM

Haw. Doe Ksh Kay Ya Oun Hey, (Hello. How are you.)

I would like to post one version of Table Grace and ask if anyone has other versions they would like to share.

It just seemed a nice subject to talk about. And, perhaps, learn as well.

Indian Table Grace

Now I am about to eat, O Great Spirit. Give my thanks to the beasts and the birds whom you have provided for my hunger and
pray deliver my sorrow that living things must sacrifice for my
comfort and well-being. Let the feather of corn spring up in
its time and let it not wither but make full grains for the fires
of our cooking pots. Now I am about to eat.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/10/08 05:56 PM

Hello, Kimi Kaya. How nice to hear from you again.

That is a very nice prayer and I thank you for sharing it with us. I am going to copy it down and put it in my prayer journal, if you do not mind.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Phyllis
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/24/08 09:41 PM

Chapparal tea is supposed to be good for the kidneys. Has anyone ever tried it? What does it taste like?

Desert Chapparal Tea
Hot water
Dried wild lilac leaves

Pick and dry the leaves of wild lilac (also known as greasewood or creosote). Steep one teaspoon (more or less to taste) in the hot water.

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/25/08 05:49 PM

Ya Ta Say Phyllis,

Well, lilac and creosote sounds like an oxymoron! *grin*
I can't imagine anything containing creosote tasting good.
I have heard of this tea, but have never tried it.

But something I have tried that is excellent for the kidneys
and tastes very good, too, is cranberry juice.

Sorry I could not be of further help, my friend.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
'In God We Trust'
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/25/08 07:44 PM

Ya Ta Say, Kimi.

Thanks for your info. I thought creosote sounded a little drastic! I saw the recipe on a website and was curious. I drink one glass of cran/grape juice every day and that not only tastes good, it is very healthy.

Blessings to you.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/26/08 05:55 PM

Cante Waste Nape Ciyuzapo Everyone, (I greet you from my heart)

Time for a little poem. Not sure of the origin, or if it's
Native American, but it is 'cute'.

The Little Mouse

As I sat upon a hill,
A little mouse came to be,
He didn't seem to be afraid,
He sat and looked at me,

I introduced myself as friend,
And he didn't seem to mind,
For some reason the little mouse,
Thought of me as kind,

He didn't try to run away,
And stayed for some time I think,
He even took an acorn as a gift,
Then gave me a little wink,

I'll never forget that little mouse,
Who made a friend of me,
For even the smallest creatures,
Can be a friend you see,

So never think yourself alone,
Just take a look around,
A friend may be right next to you,
Sitting upon the ground. [i]
[/i]

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
'In God We Trust'
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/28/08 07:05 PM

I love your little mouse, Kimi! Little friends like that are a treasure to cherish.

Are you still happy with your medicine wheel? It sounded like it was really pretty.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/29/08 05:22 PM

I must admit, Phyllis, that it has been too hot for me to spend any time at my Medicine Wheel. Even during the evenings!

I have not even checked on it lately, but with the exception of a few leaves and twigs on the table, it should be just fine. Thank you for asking.

Is yours just a plesant thought, or have you started working on it? Hummm, get busy, my friend, you KNOW you want to do this. *grin*

I came across a cute story of the Raven and shall post it next time I stop by the campfire.

We have passed out 'talking sticks' several times...now we just
need to get them working! Perhaps when it becomes cooler and more gather around the campfire, our friends will have stories, poems or legends to share with everyone. Perhaps?

Until I return with the Raven I offer to all...
Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/30/08 01:09 AM

Ya Ta Say, Kimi

My Medicine Wheel is for now just a pleasant thought. I had started gathering rocks that I could paint and had quite a few then my mother's health took a drastic change for the worse. She has been in and out of the hospital several times over the last 4 months and I have been spending a lot of time with her. She is 86 and it just seems that suddenly she has lost her spritely, energetic ways and is becoming frail. I also have been packing to move once again - so, I have been much too busy to carry on with my projects. It is all I can do right now to focus on my writing.

We have passed out a lot of 'talking sticks' and I hope to hear from more of our friends soon. I agree it will pick up when the summer is over and autumn once again begins to cool us off.

I look forward to hearing your Raven story.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, my friend.
Phyllis
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/06/08 03:53 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Cola,

As promised (finally, *grin*):

The Raven

Once upon a time, the only light in the world was hoarded by a mean old Chief who was not disposed to share it. RAVEN, bored of fluttering around in the dark, decided this would not do. So he turned himself into a cedar leaf and sneakily fluttered into the chief's dwelling.

The Chief's daughter was sipping a drink and RAVEN fluttered into the cup as she raised it to her lips. Swallowing him down, she immediately became pregnant and gave birth. Which caused no end of confusion.

The baby had raven-black hair, dark glowing eyes, and was very temperamental. Whenever it was bored, it shrieked. The Chief, trying to be a doting grandad, said: "Give the baby what it wants". So they gave the baby a bag of shining stars. It played merrily with these, until one day in gurgling excitement it threw them through the smoke hole in the ceiling and they scattered up into the sky.

Oh dear. The baby is bored again. It's bawling. It wants another bag. It's driving the household crazy. It must be pacified. So they give it a bag containing the Moon and soon the baby is happy again, bouncing the Moon all over the place. You'll never guess what happens next. Whoooosh! � up through the smoke hole goes the Moon. (Pause for gasp of astonishment from the audience).

Deprived of another toy, the baby becomes really disruptive. The Chief is tearing his hair out. The whole household is muttering. Find something, anything, to keep the baby quiet! The baby rejects all homemade playthings and points to the last bag. Uh-oh. They give it to the baby but with dire warnings. "Don't untie it because it contains Light � and that leaks like nobody's business."

Now you think you know what's going to happen. But you don't. What happened is that the baby turned back into RAVEN, cried "Ka very much" and flew through the smoke hole carrying the bag in his beak. He'd stolen the Sun.

RAVEN spread light throughout the world and so the Chief's daylight saving scheme came to an end. He was very disgruntled. His recorded comments contain very strong language in the Tsimshian dialect.

I think that is the cutiest little story!

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
In God We Trust

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/07/08 02:12 PM

I love stories of Raven! Thank you, Kimi Kaya.
Posted By: Lois H

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/17/08 08:19 PM

I am so glad I found this circle! Hello to everyone;I have enjoyed reading all the postings. I will spread my blanket and visit the circle often. Thanks DawnEagle.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/17/08 09:40 PM

You are always welcome here at our Camp Fire, Lois. DawnEagle is no longer at BellaOnline, she left about a year ago. I am the editor/moderator and I am happy to see you will join our forum. You are a welcome prescence in our circle.
Posted By: Lois H

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/17/08 09:43 PM

Sorry Phyllis. I read about the change and then just totally spaced when I posted my comments. May you walk always in peace and balance. I will visit again soon. I am at work right now and it is slow; so I am zipping around on the computer to keep from getting too bored. LOL
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/18/08 02:43 PM

That is not a problem, Lois - no need to apologize. I am just happy to have a new person in our circle. I think you will enjoy it here as everyone will enjoy your input.

Have a great day! May you always walk in Beauty and Harmony.
Posted By: Lois H

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/19/08 05:34 PM

Phyllis, I have been going back through a lot of the stories you and other have shared around the fire. They are great;I know I will learn a lot from the circle. Anyone from the Cherokee Reservation in N.C.? Also Phyllis I am not very computer savy; would you please let me know how I get to the site with the Pow-Wow listings?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/19/08 07:22 PM

I used to post all the listings myself, but that took so much time and my list was not always complete. Below are some good links you can just click on to get some information on PowWows:

www.powwows.com

www.powwowschedule.com

BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/21/08 07:28 PM

Ya Ta Say, Lois!

I, too, would like to welcome you to our campfire. It is so nice to have you join our little group. Please feel free to post any stories, poems, or anything at all.

Over the summer the campfire grew dim. Phyllis and I are hoping that with the weather beginning to cool more will join
and add sticks to the fire.

So, I would like to pass the 'talking stick' to you.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Lois H

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/22/08 09:00 PM

Thank you for your welcome Kimikaya. I will get out my collection of stories and share them with y'all. (yes I am from the south although I live in Utah now) LOL
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/30/08 05:34 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Cola,

I came across a paragraph that I would like to share with you...
one to make you Think.


My life is run by choices and decisions. Every choice I make today will carry with it the consequences of that choice. Every decision I make today will carry with it the consequences of that decision. The question I will ask myself today is, "Do I want to be happy or do I want to be right?" Which ever one I choose will have a lot to do with the consequences I will experience today. If today was the last day of my life, what choices and what decisions would I make?

I wonder: Can you not be happy and right?

Until next time...
Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 08/30/08 07:17 PM

Ya Ta Say, Kimi Kaya.

Those words are very thought provoking. Thank you for sharing.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
Phyllis
Posted By: Ninlil

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 09/01/08 12:44 AM

Hi everyone. I'm hoping this site can guide me in the right direction. We have been working together to help my son discover his heritage. We found that he is taino. Since he was not born on a reservation, how do I go about getting him registered? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 09/01/08 03:38 AM

Welcome to the Campfire, Ninlil.

Try checking into these organizations: Jatibonic� Ta�no Tribal Nation of Boriken (est. 1970), the Ta�no Nation of the Antilles (est. 1993) and the United Confederation of Ta�no People(est. 1998)

You can also read my article on "Tracing Your Native American Ancestry" at:BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Eng Culture Nicola Jane

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/01/08 11:14 AM

Welcome Lois, So glad you enjoying it.

Hope to catch you often! I am Nicola Jane the English Culture Editor, Now it's getting cold I could do with a camp fire! Over here I guess central heating will have to do .............LOL!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/05/08 07:14 PM

It is so wonderful to have new members visit and share at the campfire and to have old friends return. Thank you - Wado! - and welcome to all!

Wakan Tanan Kuci Un
Posted By: Straycat

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/06/08 03:36 PM

Can you recommend any good Native American writers of fiction.
I just read the first Barnaby Skye book by Richard Wheeler. I don't know if Wheeler is Native American but he writes a lot of Westerns.
Thanks
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/06/08 06:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Straycat
Can you recommend any good Native American writers of fiction.
I just read the first Barnaby Skye book by Richard Wheeler. I don't know if Wheeler is Native American but he writes a lot of Westerns.
Thanks


My newest and favorite author is Sandi Ault. Her books, Wild Indigo and Wild Inferno are centered around the Puebloan Peoples with fascinating characters like Jamaica Wild and her wolf, Mountain and mysteries to solve. Very good reading! Her new book in the series, Wild Sorrow, should be coming out soon. smile
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/06/08 06:27 PM

PS: Sandi Ault is not Native American but does have extensive knowledge of the Puebloan way of life and beliefs.

Momaday, N. Scott (Kiowa), wrote House Made of Dawn in 1968. I have not yet read it, but heard it is really good and well recommended.

I found a link to a site that lists Native American fiction writers. It looks pretty good:

www.multcolib.org/books/lists/NatAmerWriters.pdf
Posted By: Straycat

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/07/08 12:07 PM

Phyllis, thanks I'll check it out at the library.
Posted By: Wendy Tall One

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/07/08 12:43 PM

Recently, by referral of my great aunt, I read "13 moons" by Charles Frazier.

It is set in the Civil War South. It is basically an orphaned white boy who is sold as an indentured servant to work an out post in the middle of no where not quite NC yet, and how he becomes part of the Native tribe in the area.
Posted By: Straycat

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/07/08 01:00 PM

Wendy, I'll put this on my list also, thanks.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/09/08 07:31 PM

Ya Ta Say!

I am so pleased to see more friends join us here around the campfire.

I welcome you all and would like to say:
'Cante Waste Nape Ciyu Zapo' (I greet you from my heart).

A little poem I would like to share:

THE HILLS THAT SPEAK

The hills that speak with the voice of one,
The sparkle of the all knowing sun,
The remnants of a stream gone dry,
The sound of an eagle as he passes by,
A movement in the rocks so slight
As you turn to see a lizard run in fright...

All these are there for you to hear,
If you would but listen to the hills.


Until next time,
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.....for those of you who may not know, that means...'May The Great Spirit Bless You'.

Hugs,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/12/08 05:52 PM

Kimi Kaya,

Greetings and blessings to you.

I love your poems - thank you for sharing.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/12/08 07:38 PM

Ya Ta Say!
Cante Waste Nape Ciyu Zapo
Wakan Tanan Kici Un

Hi Kimi,

Could you please let me know from what language the above phrases come from?

I am trying to learn short phrases (greetings, blessings, etc) from Native American languages and eventually learn entire (hopefully) languages, starting with the ones that are free on-line. I am very concerned that a lot of languages of the First Peoples are becoming lost to the younger generations frown and I would like to do what I can to help prevent that from happening.

One of my goals in life is to teach Native American languages or at least help in that cause. smile

Thank you.
Wakan Tanan Kici Un
Phyllis
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/18/08 03:59 PM

Lakota Prayer:

Wakan Tanka ~ Oh, great mystery
teach me how to trust my heart and mind,
and to listen to the intuition of my small voice within.
To trust the sacred senses of my body
and the blessings of my spririt.
Please teach me to trust all these things
and to be still, as the air before the dawn
that I might enter my sacred space
and learn to love beyond my fear
and thus, walk in the beauty way of peace
with the passing of each sun.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/21/08 04:54 PM

I agree, Phyllis. It seems the younger people are not interested in learning the native language. What a shame.

It is a very admirable goal you have set for yourself. I wish you luck!

I, too, am trying to learn Lakota. Unfortunately, I was not taught. With the exception of 'ya ta say' which is Apache, the other two phrases are Lakota. My personal favorite is 'Wakan Tanan Kici Un'!

A few Lakota words that may interest you:
'pilamaya' (thank you) or 'pila mita' (my thanks)
'atanikili' (you are awesome)
'heen akeeya' (smile)

oglu waste mitakola, (Good luck, My Friend)
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/21/08 05:50 PM

Thank you, Kimi Kaya. I will add these phrases to my notebook.

I am excited about learning the old languages and doing what I can to pass them on to younger generations.

Pilamaya.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/29/08 09:17 PM

Haw mitakola,

Time for a story.

An old Grandfather said to his grandson, who came to him with anger at a friend who had done him an injustice,
"Let me tell you a story.

I too, at times, have felt a great hate for those that have taken so much, with no sorrow for what they do.

But hate wears you down, and does not hurt your enemy.

It is like taking poison and wishing your enemy would die.

I have struggled with these feelings many times." He continued, "It is as if there are two wolves inside me.

One is good and does no harm. He lives in harmony with all around him, and does not take offense when no offense was intended.

He will only fight when it is right to do so, and in the right way.

But the other wolf, ah! He is full of anger. The littlest thing will set him into a fit of temper. He fights everyone, all the time, for no reason.

He cannot think because his anger and hate are so great. It is helpless anger, for his anger will change nothing.

Sometimes, it is hard to live with these two wolves inside me, for both of them try to dominate my spirit."

The boy looked intently into his Grandfather's eyes and asked, "Which one wins, Grandfather?"

The Grandfather smiled and quietly said, "The one I feed."


Now, was Grandfather trying to be funny? Teach a lesson? Or, just trying make his grandson think?

Perhaps you have another 'take' on the story.

I would like to hear what you think.....

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Ka Dish Day,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 09/30/08 01:31 AM

Cante Waste Nape Ciyu Zapo, Kimi Kaya.

I think Grandfather is trying to give the boy a lesson in managing his emotions and learning how to grow spiritually. If you dwell on the negative, you feed the anger and hate. If you try to look on the bright side and find something positive from the experience, you will be able to focus on the good. For one to grow and be in harmony with Nature and all Creation, feed the good wolf.

Does anyone else have a theory or feeling about the story?

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
Phyllis
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/05/08 03:55 PM

Well, Le Mita Cola (My Friend), it seems no one else wishes to comment on the story.

I have been checking each day since you wrote your wonderful
paragraph. I feel you have, and please excuse an old cliche, 'hit the nail on the head'. I am sure that is exactly what the Grandfather was trying to get across. And you have expressed it so eloquently. Pilamaya.

I read a wonderful quote this morning that I would like to share.
Evidently, a Dr. Schueller said this when asked why so many people died in the terrorist's attacks of 9/11: "Take an O out of good and we have God; put a D before evil and we have devil."

Until another time, may you all walk in peace.
Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/18/08 03:46 AM

Recently I asked a friend for his permission to use his name in a book I am writing. I said I would like to credit him with being an inspiration to me. He said that he will not take credit for my own spiritual growth and inspirations, that I am who I am from following my own heart.

All birds, even those of the same species, are not alike, and it is the same with animals and with human beings. The reason Wakan Tanka does not make two birds, or animals, or human beings exactly alike is because each is placed here by Wakan Tanka to be an independent individuality and to rely upon itself.
Shooter - Teton Sioux
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/23/08 06:10 PM

I usually get up in the morning long before the sun rises. I love to sit on my back porch with a hot cup of coffe and commune with the stars, Nature and my ancestors and pray for whatever is on my mind. This morning I woke up long after the sun had risen, due to lack of sleep for several nights. I felt like over half my day was missing.

What is your special time of day to commune with Nature?
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/25/08 06:39 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Cola, Phyllis,

I very much enjoyed reading your quoted paragraph from 'Shooter'. Wakan Tanan is Wise beyond compare, which of course, goes without saying.

You have posed an interesting question. For me, not being a 'morning person', my special time would be right at sunset.
The heat of the Florida day is beginning to cool, wildlife is
coming out to search for dinner before sleep and the colors of
sunset can be stunning. That is when I commune with Nature and thank the Great Spirit for my day. Not all days are 'good' and pain-free, but it's important to offer thanks, nontheless.

I, too, would like to hear others thoughts on Phyllis' interesting question.

And now, something a bit lighter; Native American humor:

Luther, a Tsa la gi, explained his creative God by saying, "God take Himself and make the fish, God take Himself and make the tsi s du [rabbit]; He take Himself and make the wa ya [wolf]; He take Himself and make the squirrel, and He take Himself and make me. These things my brothers." But, Luther, what do you do when you want to go squirrel hunting? Merriment danced in his black eyes and he added, "I just say, Squirrel-Brother, God made you for me!"

"Heen Akeeya" (smile).

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
Kimi Kaya



Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 10/25/08 07:03 PM

Thank you for your comments and thoughts, Kimi. I love your little story about Luther.

The way you describe your special time in the evening is very peaceful and I can imagine it clearly. Thank you for sharing.

Anyone else have a special time to commune with Nature?
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/01/08 12:56 PM

It has been long time my last visited. How are you all?
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/01/08 09:11 PM

Ya Ta Say, Katja!

It is so nice to see you again. So, the better question would be "How are you?".

I am so pleased to see you here again at the campfire, because we have few that have wanted to join us here. Which means the fire grows dim and there are no new stories, or legends or anyone to carry on the "talking stick".....what a shame.

Perhaps you have a story to tell? I am sure we would all be very interested in reading something from your great country!

Until later, I would like to say:
Wakan Tanan Kici Un, Dear Friend.
Hugs,
Kimi Kaya
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/02/08 04:40 AM

Here is finnish story about Kalevala
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Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/02/08 04:48 AM

I also want introduce you Moomin, finnish troll

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Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/03/08 06:19 PM

Cante Waste Nape Ciyu Zapo, Katja (I greet you from my heart. Kimi taught me this phrase, it is Lakota language).

How very nice to hear from you again. It has been a long time. I hope all is well with you. Thanks for sharing your story about Kalevala.

I hope you come back to the campfire often. Kimi and I are trying to keep the flames going and it helps a great deal when you and others come in to join us. Thank you.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/08/08 06:29 PM

I love the humour of the Cherokee:

When the white man discovered this country Indians were running it. No taxes, no debt, women did all the work. White man thought he could improve on a system like this. - Cherokee
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/10/08 10:39 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Cola,

Your Cherokee humor did make me giggle, Phyllis. Although, being a woman, I guess I should not have. *grin*

I am pleased and honored to see that you are using the Lakota phrases, Phyllis.

Pilamaya, Katja, for your stories and the introduction to the little trol. Interesting reading.

I would like to share a poem with all here around our campfire.
I do not know the author, or origin, nor do I remember where I found it:

This Quite Place

I don't know what time it is, It may be very late,
But I have dreams to dream and thoughts to think that simply cannot wait.

I don't know what the weather is, it may be sun or snow.
But in these books and at this time are things I need to know.
I'm not so sure that I'm alone, or if there's someone there;
It would be nice to hear a voice, for there is much to share.

I don't need to know your faults, they may not be for me.
No critic enters in this place, nor do my faults they see,

For only One Pure Being knows the time, or shows through your dear face,
Only the One Presence fills our hearts to share this quiet place.


Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/11/08 01:30 AM

Pilamaya, Kimmi, for such a lovely and thought provoking poem. I am so happy to have you and others share these wonderful stories, prayers and poems - it makes it all so worth it to have friends here.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
Phyllis

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/16/08 07:43 PM

The beauty of the trees, the softness of the air,
the fragrance of the grass speaks to me.
The summit of the mountain, the thunder of the sky,
The rhythm of the sea, speaks to me.
The faintness of the stars, the freshness of the morning,
the dewdrop on the flower, speaks to me.
The strength of the fire, the taste of salmon, the trail of the sun,
and the life that never goes away, they speak to me
And my heart soars.

Chief Dan George

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/17/08 11:38 PM

What a beautiful poem, Phyllis. With your permission, I have copied and saved it.
Chief Dan George was a very wise man and we have learned much from him.

And now, may I offer a prayer:

An Indian Prayer
By H. Kent Craig

My Grandfather is the Fire
My Grandmother is the Wind
The Earth is my Mother
The Great Spirit is my Father

The World stopped at my birth
And laid itself at my feet
And I shall swallow the Earth whole
When I die
And the Earth and I will be one

Hail The Great Spirit, my Father
Without Him no one could exist
Because there would be no will to live

Hail The Earth, my Mother
Without which no food could be grown
And so cause the will to live to starve

Hail the Wind, my Grandmother
For she brings loving, lifegiving rain
Nourishing us as she nourishes our crops

Hail the Fire, my Grandfather
For the light, the warmth, the comfort he brings
Without which we be animals, not men

Hail my parent and grandparents
Without which
Not I
Nor you
Nor anyone else
Could have existed

Life gives life
Which gives unto itself
A promise of new life

Hail the Great Spirit, The Earth, the Wind, the Fire
Praise my parents loudly
For they are your parents, too

Oh, Great Spirit, giver of my life
Please accept this humble offering of prayer
This offering of praise
This honest reverence of my Love for You.


Lovely, is is not?

I hope we can keep the campfire burning brightly.....I pass the 'talking stick' onto others.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un!
Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/18/08 04:57 PM

Beautiful, Kimi, pila mita. You threw in another word there: "Wowastelaka". Please tell me what that means so I can add it to my language list. Thank you, my friend.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/20/08 06:11 PM

Sorry, Phyllis, for 'throwing' the word out (hope it did not land on your toe! *grin*)without identifying it.

It is one of our most beautiful words.....'love'.

Until another time,
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.

Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Eewoblu.win

DiscoveryThe Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/20/08 07:47 PM

Ya-Tah-Hey..(Dineh for Hello;-)
I just ran across this delightful story and as I had read it before, it was like finding a lost friend. It's a wonderful reminder that we should go through the day in balance. A reminder
to let the 'poison' of all things negative fall away like ashes in the wind.
The circle of our life can be healed if we begin in the center altar (Hocoka). From an article in Indian Country *Lakota Times)6/14/2000.
Le lila anpetu waste!
Eewoblu.win
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/22/08 07:01 PM

Originally Posted By: kimikaya
Sorry, Phyllis, for 'throwing' the word out (hope it did not land on your toe! *grin*)without identifying it.

It is one of our most beautiful words.....'love'.

Until another time,
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.

Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya


Perfectyly wonderful!!! Thank you.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/23/08 09:57 PM

Mitakuye Oyasin -

Monday, November 24th. is 'Native American Heritage Day', mitakola.

In that spirit, may I offer:

There is a commonly held belief that thousands of years ago as the world today counts time, Mongolian nomads crossed a land bridge to enter the western hemisphere, and became the people now known as American Indians. The truth of course, is that the raven found our forefathers in a clam shell on the beach at Naikun. At his bidding they entered a world peopled by birds, beasts and creatures of great power......At least that's a little bit of the truth.
Bill Reid, Haida


That is from a card that had a really cool background and graphics. Wish I could have added them here. I have no comment on the above and I guess we can all think what we will.

But to all Native Americans here, I wish you a 'Happy Day'!

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastlaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/24/08 05:22 PM

Hello Kimi. I love the contributions you add to the campfire.

I am submitting two articles today that are Creation Myths. One will be at the Native American site and one at the Folklore site. I wish I could put all the many different tribal Creation stories in my articles. Maybe I can begin to submit one each month. What do you think? Now tell me true - would this be a good idea?

Wakan Tanan Kici Un, my friend.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/26/08 06:04 PM

"Happy Thanksgiving" to Everyone!

An Indian Thanksgiving Prayer:

We return thanks to our mother,
the earth, which sustains us.

We return thanks to the rivers and streams,
which supply us with water.

We return thanks to all herbs,
which furnish medicines for the cure of our diseases.

We return thanks to the moon and stars,
which have given to us their light when the sun was gone.

We return thanks to the sun,
that has looked upon the earth with a beneficent eye.

Lastly, we return thanks to the Great Spirit,
in Whom is embodied all goodness, and
Who directs all things for the good of Her children.

~ Iroquois Prayer ~


May you all have a Very Blessed Day!

Wakan Tanan Kici Un,
kimi kaya
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/26/08 06:48 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Kola, Phyllis.

I very much enjoyed your stories of creation!

The Apache tale was certainly Imagi-Native!

I do like your idea of publishing one each month. I, for one, would be most anxious to read them!

Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 11/29/08 06:29 PM

My Friends,

Here is a story that I received from a Native American friend,
thankfully, after I had celebrated Thanksgiving.

Some of this sad tale I am aware of, however, it still made me cry. Perhaps it will touch your heart, as well.

Thanksgiving: A Native American View
by Jacqueline Keeler

I celebrate the holiday of Thanksgiving.

This may surprise those people who wonder what Native Americans think of this official U.S. celebration of the survival of early arrivals in a European invasion that culminated in the death of 10 to 30 million native people.

Thanksgiving to me has never been about Pilgrims. When I was six, my mother, a woman of the Dineh nation, told my sister and me not to sing "Land of the Pilgrim's pride" in "America the Beautiful." Our people, she said, had been here much longer and taken much better care of the land. We were to sing "Land of the Indian's pride" instead.

I was proud to sing the new lyrics in school, but I sang softly. It was enough for me to know the difference. At six, I felt I had learned something very important. As a child of a Native American family, you are part of a very select group of survivors, and I learned that my family possessed some "inside" knowledge of what really happened when
those poor, tired masses came to our homes.

When the Pilgrims came to Plymouth Rock, they were poor and hungry -- half of them died within a few months from disease and hunger. When Squanto, a Wampanoag man, found them, they were in a pitiful state. He spoke English, having traveled to Europe, and took pity on them. Their English crops had failed. The native people fed them through the winter and taught them how to grow their food.

These were not merely "friendly Indians." They had already experienced European slave traders raiding their villages for a hundred years or so, and they were wary -- but it was their way to give freely to those who had nothing. Among many of our peoples, showing that you can give without holding back is the way to earn respect. Among the Dakota, my father's people, they say, when asked to give, "Are we not Dakota and alive?" It was believed that by giving there would be enough for all --the exact opposite of the system we live in now, which is based on selling, not giving.

To the Pilgrims, and most English and European peoples, the Wampanoags were heathens, and of the Devil. They saw Squanto not as an equal but as an instrument of their God to help his chosen people, themselves.

Since that initial sharing, Native American food has spread around the world. Nearly 70 percent of all crops grown today were originally cultivated by Native American peoples. I sometimes wonder what they ate in Europe before they met us. Spaghetti without tomatoes? Meat and potatoes without potatoes? And at the "first Thanksgiving" the Wampanoags provided most of the food -- and signed a treaty granting
Pilgrims the right to the land at Plymouth, the real reason for the first Thanksgiving.

What did the Europeans give in return? Within 20 years European disease and treachery had decimated the Wampanoags. Most diseases then came from animals that Europeans had domesticated. Cowpox from cows led to smallpox, one of the great killers of our people, spread through gifts of blankets used by infected Europeans. Some estimate that diseases
accounted for a death toll reaching 90 percent in some Native American communities. By 1623, Mather the elder, a Pilgrim leader, was giving thanks to his God for destroying the heathen savages to make way "for a better growth," meaning his people.

In stories told by the Dakota people, an evil person always keeps his or her heart in a secret place separate from the body. The hero must find that secret place and destroy the heart in order to stop the evil.

I see, in the "First Thanksgiving" story, a hidden Pilgrim heart. The story of that heart is the real tale than needs to be told. What did it hold? Bigotry, hatred, greed, self- righteousness? We have seen the evil that it caused in the 350 years since. Genocide, environmental devastation, poverty, world wars, racism.

Where is the hero who will destroy that heart of evil? I believe it must be each of us. Indeed, when I give thanks this Thursday and I cook my native food, I will be thinking of this hidden heart and how my ancestors survived the evil it caused.

Because if we can survive, with our ability to share and to give intact, then the evil and the good will that met that Thanksgiving day in the land of the Wampanoag will have come full circle.

And the healing can begin.


I believe this story should be passed to as many as possible.....just my thought.

I hope all have had a wonderful, peaceful, sharing and blessed Thanksgiving.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/01/08 06:33 PM

Thank you, Kimi. Wakan Tanan Kici Un for remembering the noble people who helped the pilgrims survive and taught them how to grow their own foods. Too often, the truth is not revealed or taught to our young and it should be.

Wowastelaka to all.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/04/08 04:20 PM

I was watching a King of the Hill episode the day before Thanksgiving and it was about celebrating Thanksgiving.

Bobby, Hank Hill's son asked John Redcorn, the town's resident Native American, if his people celebrated Thanksgiving.

John Redcorn's response was "We did...once."

That statement speaks volumes.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/04/08 04:55 PM

John Redcorn is a wise and deep-thinking man.

I love that show!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/04/08 04:57 PM

I have met a young teacher thru this site and she is very much into teaching her students the truth about the history of Native Americans. I will be doing an interview with her very soon.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/04/08 05:35 PM

Getting to do interviews is exciting, isn't it? I have one coming up for my wrestling site.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/04/08 05:40 PM

I have never done one before and am really looking forward to it. This teacher is very dedicated to her students and to history.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/09/08 05:17 PM

I wish all my friends that come to this Campfire Circle a blessed and joyous Christmas.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un
Posted By: KatjaP

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/17/08 06:58 AM

Merry Christmas for everyone from Finland
Here is link for finnish chritsmas page
BellaOnline ALERT: Raw URLs are not allowed in these forums for security reasons. Please use UBB code. If you don't know how to do UBB code just post here for help - we will help out!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/18/08 03:19 PM

"Hyvaa joulua", Katja! Hope all is well with you. Thank you for sharing.

I viewed the links and really enjoyed the stories. I put a copy of the links and your message in my Folklore site also which I hope you visit. We have a "Front Porch" where a lot of people get together, just like the "Campfire".

Thank you again for sharing. It is always so nice to hear from you!
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/18/08 05:57 PM

"Christ Tunpi" (Merry Christmas) to all my Dear Friends here at the 'campfire'.

I wish you all "Wowahwa" (Peace) and "Yawaste" (Blessings)in the New Year.

My wish for the New Year? That many more will join us around the campfire, so that there are many to carry the 'talking stick'!

"Icantewaste Teca Omaka"!(Happy New Year)

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastelaka
(Love),
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/20/08 03:59 AM

A very Merry Christmas and blessed New Year to you, Kimi.

And to all my friends here I wish you all blessings and joy and peace.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un and Wowastelaka to all.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/21/08 07:00 PM

Pila Mita, Phyllis!

I would like to offer:

Twelve Indian Days of Christmas

Gather round children and let us teach you a song that helps us to remember the sacred things of our Grandfather and the reasons that He came to walk our Land, clothed in Red Dirt. We are excited to learn the things He accomplished for us, among us, and through us. We are most excited that all the ways we have walked before now pointed us to this moment, when we �� mere humans�.. would be able to walk as sons of the Most Holy One.

On the First day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... an Eagle sitting on a cedar tree� (Remember children, the eagle climbs the highest and takes our prayers to the High places, and the eagle is Jesus, the One who was able also to climb to the heavenlies once and for all, to take our prayers, He is the Intercessor for all men)

On the second day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me� two wise owls (remember children that the owls represent both death and sacred messages from the Holy places� and in this song they represent the Old testament and the New� both law that brought death and mercy that brought life and spiritual wisdom)

On the third day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me� three sacred drums (for the drums beat out the sound of our Mother Earth while we pray to the Grandfather.. so as you hear them beat, remember we now know that there is faith, hope and love in The Father, Son and the Holy Spirit)

On the fourth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... four talking feathers (for the feathers remind us that Matthew, Mark, Luke and John were given the talking feather by the Grandfather Himself, to tell His story to us all)

On the fifth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... five prayer ties (for we must remember that the law did not vanish and though we live by grace, there is a law to be followed and we humbly submit to that law, in offering our prayers to the Holy One)

On the sixth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... six hawks a laying (for we celebrate the creation of our mother earth, and thank Him for giving us all life, through our prayers, often using the feathers of this creature to smudge ourselves in preparation of that prayer time)

On the seventh day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... seven stones for sweat lodge (For we must remember the gifts of the Spirit are seven fold, and we learn how to walk in these gifts through our fear and awe of our God, we do this praying in our lodges)

On the eighth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... eight great buffalo (for we want to remember the beatitudes, the blessings Jesus promised to come to His people, The buffalo represent His provision for our health, our very existence, as did the blessings He invoked on the people, the meek, those who weep, the poor� all people have provision in Him)

On the ninth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me� nine precious elders (for as we sit at the feet of our elders we hear how we can walk in the fruits of the Holy Spirit, they have always taught these truths, we just didn't know that they were the same truths taught by the talking leaves the white men brought to us)

On the tenth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me... ten eagle dancers (for our eagle dancers dance for the people, to protect the people, to keep the people in wholeness, and wellness.. as the ten commandments were also set to keep the people whole, to protect them from their own evil thoughts.)

On the eleventh day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me� eleven braids of sweet grass ( for as we send the smell of sweet grass to the heavenlies, it invites those of the realm of the Grandfather, to enter into our world to help us� in this we remember the faithful eleven who stood ready to help our Savior, ready to do His will and work.. so it is with those we invite to help us, if sent by Jesus.)

On the twelfth day of Christmas, Grandfather gave to me� twelve drummers singing (for the drums He gave on the third day can not help us to pray if they do not have four drummers each to beat out the heartbeat of the earth and its people to our God� and when natives are on the drum, we call it singing, because it is much more than just drumming...)

Merry Christmas to all my relations!


I really dislike the 'Twelve Days of Christmas' song, but when written as above, it has much meaning for me.
I hope you all enjoy it.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastelaka,
kimi kaya

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/22/08 05:28 PM

Kimi Kaya,

Pila Mita! This version of the Twelve Days Of Christmas is the most beautiful I have ever read. Bless you for sharing this with us. I am going to put it in my "Book Of Treasures".

Merry Christmas and much Wowastelaka.
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 12/31/08 06:30 PM

Happy New Year to all my valuable new friends and faithful old friends - you are all cherished in my heart!

Wakan Tanan Kici Un
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 01/20/09 07:23 PM

Grandfather Great Spirit
All over the world the faces
of living ones are alike.

With tenderness they have
come up out of the ground.

Look upon your children
that they may face the winds
And walk the good road to the Day of Quiet.

Grandfather Great Spirit
Fill us with the Light.
Give us the strength to understand,
And the eyes to see.

Teach us to walk the soft Earth
as relatives to all that live.

Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 01/22/09 08:37 PM

Ya Ta Say Le Mita Cola, Phyllis,

What a nice prayer to Grandfather!

We all need to learn to walk the 'Red Road' to the
'Day Of Quiet'.

Pilamaya.
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.

Wowastelaka,
Kimi Kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 01/23/09 09:27 PM

Thank you, Kimi Kaya. I find a lot of good poems and prayers at one of my favorite sites, which is:

First People U.S.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Hello Place: Welcome to the Campfire! - 02/06/09 05:14 PM

A Blackfoot Legend

Thunder you have heard him, he is everywhere. He roars in the mountains, he shouts far out on the prairie. He strikes the high rocks, and they fall to pieces. He hits a tree, and it is broken in slivers. He strikes the people, and they die. He is bad. He does not like the towering cliff, the standing tree, or living man. He likes to strike and crush them to the ground. Yes, yes! Of all he is most powerful; he is the one most strong. But I have not told you the worst: he sometimes steals women.

Long ago, almost in the beginning, a man and his wife were sitting in their lodge, when Thunder came and struck them. The man was not killed. At first he was as if dead, but after a while he lived again, and rising looked about him. His wife was not there. "Oh, well," he thought, "she has gone to get some water or wood," and he sat a while; but when the sun had under-disappeared, he went out and inquired about her of the people. No one had seen her. He searched throughout the camp, but did not find her. Then he knew that Thunder had stolen her, and he went out on the hills alone and mourned.

When morning came, he rose and wandered far away, and he asked all the animals he met if they knew where Thunder lived. They laughed, and would not answer. The Wolf said: "Do you think we would seek the home of the only one we fear? He is our only danger. From all others we can run away; but from him there is no running. He strikes, and there we lie. Turn back! go home! Do not look for the dwelling-place of that dreadful one." But the man kept on, and traveled far away. Now he came to a lodge, a queer lodge, for it was made of stone; just like any other lodge, only it was made of stone. Here lived the Raven chief. The man entered.

"Welcome, my friend," said the chief of Ravens. "Sit down, sit down." And food was placed before him.

Then, when he had finished eating, the Raven said, "Why have you come?"

"Thunder has stolen my wife," replied the man. "I seek his dwelling-place that I may find her."

"Would you dare enter the lodge of that dreadful person?" asked the Raven. "He lives close by here. His lodge is of stone, like this; and hanging there, within, are eyes, the eyes of those he has killed or stolen. He has taken out their eyes and hung them in his lodge. Now, then, dare you enter there?"

"No," replied the man. "I am afraid. What man could look at such dreadful things and live?"

"No person can," said the Raven. "There is but one old Thunder fears. There is but one he cannot kill. It is I, it is the Ravens. Now I will give you medicine, and he shall not harm you. You shall enter there, and seek among those eyes your wife's; and if you find them, tell that Thunder why you came, and make him give them to you. Here, now, is a raven's wing. Just point it at him, and he will start back quick; but if that fail, take this. It is an arrow, and the shaft is made of elk-horn. Take this, I say, and shoot it through the lodge."

"Why make a fool of me?" the poor man asked. "My heart is sad. I am crying." And he covered his head with his robe, and wept.

"Oh," said the Raven, "you do not believe me. Come out, come out, and I will make you believe." When they stood outside, the Raven asked, "Is the home of your people far?"
"A great distance," said the man.

"Can you tell how many days you have traveled?"

"No," he replied, "my heart is sad. I did not count the days. The berries have grown and ripened since I left."

"Can you see your camp from here?" asked the Raven.

The man did not speak. Then the Raven rubbed some medicine on his eyes and said, "Look!" The man looked, and saw the camp. It was close. He saw the people. He saw the smoke rising from the lodges.

"Now you will believe," said the Raven. "Take now the arrow and the wing, and go and get your wife."

So the man took these things, and went to the Thunder's lodge. He entered and sat down by the doorway. The Thunder sat within and looked at him with awful eyes. But the man looked above, and saw those many pairs of eyes. Among them were those of his wife.

"Why have you come?" said the Thunder in a fearful voice.

"I seek my wife," the man replied, "whom you have stolen. There hang her eyes."

"No man can enter my lodge and live," said the Thunder; and he rose to strike him. Then the man pointed the raven wing at the Thunder, and he fell back on his couch and shivered. But he soon recovered, and rose again. Then the man fitted the elk-horn arrow to his bow, and shot it through the lodge of rock; right through that lodge of rock it pierced a jagged hole, and let the sunlight in.

"Hold," said the Thunder. "Stop; you are the stronger. Yours the great medicine. You shall have your wife. Take down her eyes." Then the man cut the string that held them, and immediately his wife stood beside him.

"Now," said the Thunder, "you know me. I am of great power. I live here in summer, but when winter comes, I go far south. I go south with the birds. Here is my pipe. It is medicine. Take it, and keep it. Now, when I first come in the spring, you shall fill and light this pipe, and you shall pray to me, you and the people. For I bring the rain which makes the berries large and ripe. I bring the rain which makes all things grow, and for this you shall pray to me, you and all the people."

Thus the people got the first medicine pipe. It was long ago.

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/26/09 05:39 PM

Oh, Phyllis! Your legend story made the goose bumps come to my arms! It wasn't long ago that I learned about the raven and shell creation story. Soon after that I met a woman who's name is 'Sings with Ravens' and she wrote a song called 'Crow Spirit'. That song led me to her and ultimately led my husband and I to a Lakota Elder who has been a blessed member of our family now for a year. He's taught us so much. We attended his Sundance in SD last Aug and will go again this year. Tears sting my eyes when I think about all the wonderful changes that have taken place in my life this last year.

Thank you for welcoming me back to the Campfire....it's good to see my friends.
Mitakuye Oyasin....
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/26/09 05:54 PM

Ya Ta Say! Connidee, and welcome back. Your story of this last year fills my heart with Wowastelaka - for it is love that keeps us alive and growing. I am so happy that you have found this Lakota Elder who has become such a loving part of your life.

I hope you visit here again and often. I would love to hear more about the Elder.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un. Mitakuye Oyasin.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/26/09 06:43 PM

The campfire embers are burning low, but ever bright. Come join our never-ending circle of friends, add some sticks to the fire that burns within us all and share your stories, songs, poems and prayers. Take the Talking Stick and tell us what is in your heart.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/27/09 12:48 AM

Hello Friends,
I've brought some sticks and limbs and would like to join the circle of friends. May I hold the Talking Stick for a while?
Evening is here. Dinner over, dishes done (nearly). I'm listening to my cat snoring - he's asleep in a basket on top of the computer cabinet, my old dog is sniffing around the floor; I call it snorkling...he makes such a funny sound when he sniffs. Another old cat is sleeping on my bed behind me. I love them all so much and they're all getting old. The stray cats come to me from all over and I feed them. Some look lost and afraid; wondering whatever happened to their humans. Others are feral, but still need a bite of good food sometimes. I feed them all. Right now a little cat has come that has stolen my heart particularly. An older cat, I think. She's been declawed so I have to assume she's been spayed as well. When she first started coming around for food she was so timid and I felt a great, great sadness around her. It made me cry. I cried for her. She looked so confused. She came here about 3 or 4 months ago. I call her Yellow Kitty. Anyway, I watched her courage grow, but the sadness still surrounded her. A few days ago we had a break through. She looks at me now with trust in her eyes. Trust and love, and expectations. She considers me her human now and I'm glad. She's come into the house, but I keep her separated from my other cats. She stays on the back porch and has an appointment with the Dr next week.

I see the same behaviour in some people. Fearful trepidation accompanies a new relationship so many times. Something that I've learned over the last year is to keep my heart open and not to be afraid. Even if getting hurt is inevidable, grasping the opportunity to be someones friend, sounding board, nurturer, 'mother', 'sister', is a risk I must take. Sometimes I get hurt....most times I don't and even the hurt has a strange way of feeling okay. It's part of my growth. I have so much to learn....so much to learn....the people I've met, and lost and the experiences I've had this past year are only just the tip of the iceburg. I know I have things to do and my path is becoming clearer and clearer. I wish I could describe the joy I feel in my heart.

Whew....not sure this is what you mean by sharing stories by the campfire...I do go on sometimes. I think I'll pass the talking stick to another and listen for a while.....
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/27/09 01:59 PM

I think of you as that "Yellow Kitty", Connidee. You will find friends here at the campfire.

You are right about taking risks. One cannot find what they need in life without taking some risks. I have reached out often in the past (and sometimes this still happens) only to get slapped down - but, bounce right back up and keep looking or reaching out. Some things are just not meant to be, then some are and come in their own time.

... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease a herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
Mourning Dove - Salish

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/27/09 02:34 PM

You think of me as the Yellow Kitty? How so? (I'm certainly not offended at all....just wondering about the parallel)

(maybe I should bleach my hair.....LOL.....)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 02/27/09 03:33 PM

Well, kind of like the Yellow Kitty. You are shy and observe before stepping out then gain trust and confidence in yourself. smile

I am sure you should not bleach your hair, that you are fine just the way you are.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/16/09 02:32 AM

From Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit, there came a great unifying life force that flowed in and through all things - the flowers of the plains, blowing winds, rocks, trees, birds, animals - and was the same force that had been breathed into the first man. Thus all things were kindred, and were brought together by the same Great Mystery.

Kinship with all creatures of the earth, sky, and water was a real and active principle. In the animal and bird world there existed a brotherly feeling that kept the Lakota safe among them. And so close did some of the Lakotas come to their feathered and furred friends that in true brotherhood they spoke a common tongue.

The animals had rights - the right of a man's protection, the right to live, the right to multiply, the right to freedom, and the right to man's indebtedness - and in recognition of these rights the Lakota never enslaved an animal, and spared all life that was not needed for food and clothing.

This concept of life and its relations with humanizing, and gave to the Lakota an abiding love. It filled his being with joy and mystery of living; it gave him reverence for all life; it made a place for all things in the scheme of existence with equal importance to all.

The Lakota could not despise no creature, for all were of one blood, made by the same hand, and filled with the essence of the Great Mystery. In spirit, the Lakota were humble and meek. "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth" - this was true for the Lakota, and from the earth they inherited secrets long since forgotten. Their religion was sane, natural, and human.

Chief Luther Standing Bear - Oglala Sioux

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/16/09 03:54 PM

As I read your post, Phyllis, my arms became covered with goose bumps and tears came to my eyes. Thank you, thank you. When Cecil returns from SD (he left yesterday for a few weeks and then will return) he will want to read it, I'm sure. We miss him terribly already.

Those of us who are especially close to Cecil participated in Sweat Lodge Saturday evening to ask the Creator for Cecil's safe journey and to give thanks for his coming to us. It was a beautiful evening; the fire was especially bright and didn't seem to want to go out. The embers continued to glow well into the night.

Thank you again for the beautiful post.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/16/09 04:14 PM

You are welcome, Conni.

I would like to hear more about Cecil and his journey. He must be very loved.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/17/09 01:24 PM

I would love to tell you about Cecil. I just don't feel comfortable about telling someone else's story. Does that make sense? He is part of the generation of Native children that were taken to boarding school. He is considered a Holy Man and he is a Sundance facilitator. He makes all sizes of drums and he is teaching me to turn deer hides into rawhide which will be used to make drums. He is often asked to do healing circle, which he does but he does the healing in the traditional Lakota way. He very seldom deviates from tradition. He's very quiet and by observing his silence I find myself being more quiet and observing that which surrounds me......nature.

If I had more time (I'm working) I could probably think of more things to say.....I'll be back.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/18/09 04:30 PM

Of course that makes sense, Conni. Cecil has his own way to tell or not tell his story. I was just curious who he is. He sounds like a very interesting person. I often say, "it is good to be in silence or enter into silence, for that is when you can hear the voice of your soul". A person such as Cecil usually spends a lot of time in silence. Thank you for sharing about this very special person.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 03/31/09 11:58 PM

An Apache Prayer for those who need some encouragement and hope:

Mountain Spirit, leader of the Mountain Spirits, your body is holy.
By means of it, make him well again.
Make his body like your own.
Make him strong again.

He wants to get up with all of his body.
For that reason, he is performing this ceremony,
Do that which he has asked of you.

Long ago, it seems you restored someone's legs and eyes for them.
This has been said.
In the same way, make him free again from disease.
That is why I am speaking to you.

Posted By: bobbosgirl

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 01:46 AM

My name is Asin Ekwe, I am new to this forum. I don't have any stories, but I am learning more about my heritage. I'm glad to be here.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 02:32 AM

Welcome, Asin. Welcome. We're glad to have you. Tell us about what you're learning!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 04:54 PM

Asin, welcome to our forum - I am happy to meet you and I hope you come back often and share with us.

We would love to hear about your heritage and how you are doing with your research. The Campfire is open to all and Connidee has passed the "Talking Stick" on to you.

Welcome.
Posted By: sara1955

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 10:38 PM

I have read threads on this forum off and on for a while now. I'm not a huge poster, unless I have something of import to say smile I also don't remember if I introduced myself way back when I first started reading here. So here goes ...

I'm Sara in west Texas. I'm proud to say I have a small Cherokee heritage ... I have to admit that my father's side is also entirely Scots (a nice warring people LOL).

Thanks for letting me read and comment here and there smile
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 10:44 PM

Welcome to this forum, Sara. I do hope you return often - you are most welcome.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 11:41 PM

Sara, my grandmother always said we were Scotch-Irish. David, my husband, tells me that's a sure fire sign of Cherokee ancestry. Not sure why, but I believe what he says. He has done years worth of research and reading. I'm lazy....I let him do the reading then just tell me what he's read.

Welcome, Sara!
Posted By: sara1955

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/15/09 11:53 PM

LOL - David may have something, except that my Cherokee heritage comes through my mother's line smile They're the English. The story goes that that my great (maybe 2 greats) grandfather left the reservation due to a fight with his best friend that was supposed to be a fight to the death, but in the meantime he and his friend made up ... not wanting to kill his friend, or be killed by his friend, he (my ancestor) left the reservation. To my knowledge, we don't have his tribal name. My aunt (a great genealogist) has something that shows we originated in GA and wound up in OK ... I haven't read it or even seen it yet though smile
Posted By: bobbosgirl

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/16/09 01:40 PM

I am a Chippewa Indian and a German. My parents raised us in both worlds. Even though to the outside world, I was a dirty little indian. So, by time I graduated, I wanted nothing to do with my Chippewa heritage. I hated that part of me. I am now 35 yrs old, I now know that I can embrace both parts of me. So, now I am on a journey to find me (half Chippewa and half German). I have the foundation that my parents implanted in us. So, I started with receiving my Native name. "Asin Ekwe" means White Stone Woman. My spirit comes from The Manitoulin Island in Canada. She is a very important spirit in my tribe. White Stone is a dreamers rock. I am a great dreamer.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/16/09 03:45 PM

Hello Asin Ekwe, and welcome to my Native American forum and the Campfire. You are most welcome and I hope you come back often.

Your story is very interesting. I hope you will continue your journey in finding and strengthening your Chippewa heritage. I would love to hear more about White Stone Woman and the legend. "Dreamers" are very important to spiritual growth on Mother Earth.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/16/09 07:32 PM

I will be away from the Campfire Circle for four days beginning tomorrow. I will be thinking of you all and will return Wednesday, 4/22. Walk in Peace and Beauty and Blessings to you.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/18/09 11:42 AM

Asin Ekwe,
I would love to hear about White Stone Woman, too. White Buffalo Calf Woman brought the Sacred Ceremonies and Ways to Live to the Lakota. Please tell us about White Stone Woman....
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/19/09 01:48 AM

Asin Ekwe,
What a beautiful place to get your name from! My Mother's and my generation were raised "white." I didn't fit in and knew it early. I was in my early 30's and mother to a 3 year old when my heritage was confirmed. I tried my best to share with my daughter as I learned. She got away from it for a while, but I'm glad to say she is ready to learn again now at 23.

She attended her first gathering "solo" today. It was truly a "mixed" experience for her. However, she is very excited about the Unity Pow-Wow next month. We're coming up and all the tribes in SC will be participating. For now, it's a one day event, but I hope it grows.

Please share with us as you learn.
Posted By: bobbosgirl

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/20/09 12:15 PM

Iknow this sounds funny, but I just got my first sewing machine. I am going to make my first regala (oops, probably spelled wrong). I want to dance in my first pow wow, since I was a child. I used to do bead work, so this all will be an adventure. I will keep you posted as I learn.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/20/09 01:28 PM

That's so exciting! Have you decided on which type of dress? My daughter is working on her buckskin outfit right now. She's decided on beading an Oak Tree pattern.

When we were shopping for the materials, I was amazed at how generous all the vendors were. Some even took the time to help her work on things. One gave her a white shell bird fetish to place in her beaded tree.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/20/09 05:51 PM

I wish you the same generosity from vendors in gathering all the precious items to be included in your regalia.

I apologize for the broken post. This is so unbelievable! A squirrel chewed through a power line connector on the transformer in front of my house. There was a loud boom, and then darkness. Thank goodness for battery back-ups.

The power is restored, but unfortunately the squirrel didn't make it. Here's hoping your day is less weird than mine.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/22/09 03:49 PM

Such interesting conversations are happening here and I love it! I am excited for your daughter, Icp, and the generosity and caring of others to help her with her regalia. The white shell bird must be lovely, and so special to her. If you get any pictures of her in her regalia, I would love to see.

Sorry to hear about the poor squirrel.

bobbosgirl - this must be quite exciting for you to be making your first regalia for your first time dancing. I would love to see pictures of your regalia.

Asin Ekwe, I do hope you will share the story of White Stone Woman. I hope you come back and tell us about her.

Being in Santa Cruz made me think strongly of the Chumash tribes and their love for the ocean. The Dolphin was sacred to them. In the "Rainbow Bridge Myth" it explains why the Dolphin is so special to them. Here is a link to my article:

Rainbow Bridge Myth.



Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/22/09 06:02 PM

Phyllis, so glad to have you back with us. I hope your trip went well.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/22/09 08:38 PM

Yes, I'm glad you're back, too. Hope you were able to relax and rejuvenate!
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/22/09 09:57 PM

I am happy to be back. Being at the coast always rejuvenates me. I may go back there to live some day - it is a toss up between Santa Cruz and the Pacific Northwest. Time will tell.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/28/09 12:16 AM

You can visit my folklore forum for images of "My Father's Folk Art" at:

Folk Art
Posted By: bobbosgirl

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/30/09 02:22 AM

I haven't decided on cloth for my dress. I have been working on my wedding dress. Like I said, I am combining two cultures. I am having a christian wedding. But also preparing for my first pow wow as an adult. Two very improtant times in my life. My boyfriend bought me a sewing machine. So, I am ready to make my regalia.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 04/30/09 04:21 PM

How exciting this must be for you, bobbosgirl! What type of dress are you making for your regalia? Are you going to bead the entire yoke? Will you have tongs and beads on the bottom part of the dress? I would love to see a picture when you have finished it.

Are you also going to make your wedding dress?
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/06/09 02:37 PM

Bobbosgirl, it's exciting to start putting regalia together, I think. There's so much good advise on the internet, as far as instruction and how to's. I've got some sewing to do, myself and I need to get with it. Time goes so quickly that I can fall behind before I know it.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/06/09 05:37 PM

I have a book about how to make Native American dresses and I love it! It is invaluable to my libray and to my doll crafting dresses.

You can read about it in the book review I wrote at:

Plains Indian Dresses

The book shows how the traditional dresses were made and it has excellent, beautiful, full-colored pictures of antigue dresses and detailed instructions on assembling the hides and beading. It is wonderful!

Posted By: _OMPI_

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/08/09 02:41 PM

HALITO!!! hello everyone, i see the campfire is still going. It has been a long time since i have visited, have been busy with life and the struggles it brings us, and family. Now that things have slowed down and i have more time I will make time for more visits. i have been reading some of the stories and they are great. I will try and round up some or our Choctaw stories and share them with you. Some are very funny and others speak of lifes lessons...It is good to be back and i look forward to visiting more often..so in the mean time, in the sprit of our ancestors..i wish you enough...OMPI
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/08/09 02:47 PM

Halito, OMPI. Thank you for coming back to share with us. I would love to hear some Choctaw stories, as I am sure everyone else will.

Good to have you back at the campfire.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/08/09 06:50 PM

cante waste nape ciyuzapo,

I, too, have been away from the campfire for some time. This is so exciting to come back and see new people sitting around the fire and talking about such interesting topics!.....our fire grows strong.

It pleases me to see the 'talking stick' being passed around
so freely. For a while it was just Phyllis, Connidee and me passing the stick. This is nice, for we all have something to offer and make our fire grow stronger. And too, more to add to our short supply of hot dogs and marshmallows! *giggles*

I would like to leave you with a little poem:

FALLING STARS

The other night I watched a star fall from the sky.
It was so beautiful to behold. But yet....in a way
It was a sad thing to see. I wondered what made
It fall. Had it given up all hope and wanted to die?
Then a tear came to my eye as it disappeared
From view. I thought...Oh God...there was no
One there to catch it. It was like no one cared.

As I thought about all this. I began to think how
That my friends are like stars. How at times when
I need their light they are always there for me. How
That when I'm down....they always lift me up with the
Light of their love.
There have been times when I've felt like this falling
Star. One of those times is when I lose a friend.
When I lose a friend....a part of me dies. Because
I know their light can never be replaced. And the
Part of my heart where they stood remains dark
And void.
As long as my friends need my light......I will remain
A star in their heart. Giving to them what love and
Light I have.


Let us keep the campfire burning bright.

wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/08/09 07:36 PM

Kimi kaya, you make me cry tears of joy! What a beautiful poem to share with us. That is so like you. I love the feeling I get when I read posts here from all my friends.

Yes, it is very nice to see more friends gathering in our Campfire Circle.

Thank you for taking the Talking Stick and using it so lovingly.

wowastelaka,
Phyllis
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/13/09 06:51 PM

Hello all....may I take the Talking Stick for a little while? This weekend will be a busy one. Going to Shawnee Spring Powwow up northern Ohio Saturday. Our dear friend, Shannon, is bringing out her Jingle Dress for the first time. She had a vision of the dress about 3 years ago and took it to an Elder. She was told that she is to dance the healing Jingle Dance. After several set backs due to health and family troubles, she has her dress done and will present it Saturday morning. I think the Jingle dress traditions are different with different cultures but in the Ojibwa culture the jingles are believed to take the prayers of the dancer and those she's praying for during her dancing to Creator. I think I have that right, and will be grateful for anyone to correct me if I'm not. It's been a long time for her and I am so excited for her.

Sunday we will have Sweat Lodge Ceremony at home for our Cecil. He's going back to South Dakota around the 26th and then will be leaving for Italy June 10. He'll go back to SD from there, so we won't see him again till we arrive in SD for Sundance the first of Aug. It will be a joyous homecoming, as we will miss him terribly. He's been working on pipes and drums to take home to those who don't have them. He has carved some beautiful prayer pipes. You never know what is going to come out of the pipe stone. This one he's working on now is a mans pipe, so it has a foot - but for some reason it wouldn't shape the way he wanted it to shape. He kept working on it and working on it - he's incredibly patient - and as he continued to sand and polish it became evident why it refused to take the shape he wanted. The head of an Eagle began to emerge - the inclusions and (impurities???) in the stone sometimes create incredible, beautiful images in the pipe. The foot of this pipe is the head of a soaring Eagle. You can clearly see it's beak and eye. He's working on the stem now, and will carve feathers into it. He has no one in mind for it - but he says someone at Sundance will need a pipe. This one is very special.

Pipestone is almost magical, I think. My David says that when he carves a pipe, he doesn't do the work, Creator and the stone do the work. He's listens to the stone and lets it tell him what to do. I've seen this happen several times and each pipe is different and each one is exactly as it needs to be, or is supposed to be and each pipe goes to the person that calls for it. Often the pipe is made before the person calls for it and it's all ready for them. Yup....pretty magical.

I haven't been to the Campfire in a while and just wanted to share something that is really important to me. Just wanted to share with a group of wonderful people that I feel like I know so well, yet have never met. For this gift, I am most grateful.
Aho.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/14/09 08:23 PM

Connidee, how wonderful for your friend Shannon to be so honored! I would love to see her dance. How good this must make her feel, to be able to offer the prayers up to Creator. This is so spiritual and such a blessing.

I send prayers for a safe and good journey for Cecil. I know how much you and David will look forward to his return.

The story of Cecil's pipe is so interesting and profound. There was Eagle in there and he had to come out for a special reason. It was with Cecil's hand that Eagle was able to do so. This pipe is very special and has a definite purpose.

Thank you so very much for sharing these wonderful things with all of us at the Campfire Circle. We are a circle of friends and that is a gift.
Aho, dear friend.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/18/09 12:29 AM

Dear Connidee,

I am sure that I can speak for all of us here at the Campfire.....We are most Grateful to have you here with us.
And each time you take the 'talking stick' you share so much.
Pila Mita, Le Mita Cola!

It is true.....we have never met and yet we feel this special bond and the love among us. Friends are truly the Great Spirit's gift to us.

The following is a paragraph that I found today. I thought it was worth sharing:

Morning peeks over the horizon with fresh breath and rosy cheeks. She sparkles with dew and turns the trees into halos of green that tint the air. Her eyes are blue and she turns them on earth with tender care. Her good humor reveals that it is the month of flowers - the planting month. Speak to morning with gratitude.Though she comes daily, she stays only a few hours and then she changes clothes and moves across to the time of long shadows. Show reverence to the One who gave her to us, this time of day that gives us such vigor and such vision of how we can make her day.

Until another time:
Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
wowastelaka,
kimi kaya
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/18/09 08:31 PM

Kimikaya,

What beautiful words! I watch the sun come up while I drink my morning coffee. I'll think of them as I watch grandfather sun peek over the tree tops from now on.

Shannon's jingle dress was beautiful. She did it proud. Her sponser wasn't able to be there. Car broke down in KY and unable to get it fixed in time to make it to Ohio. She was terribly disappointed, but it worked out the way it was supposed to. Sandy, (Shannon's sponser) was going to bring her scarf to complete her regalia and, of course was not able to. There were other things that were supposed to happen under Sandy's direction. We all just stood around looking at each other and suddenly everybody jumped into action. It was like Creator gave us a little shove and told us all to think outside the box. We scattered and managed to get the items she needed to bring it together. She was very emotional - her daddy is in the hospital with brain cancer, and he has absesses in his brain from the CA. She really struggled with whether or not she should proceed as planned or stay at the hospital with her dad. She said the night before when she and her husband were on their way home from the hospital she was praying and praying for him and for direction and she and Sam heard jingles. Jingles, jingles, jingles. (I have goose bumps as I write this....) The dress was not in the car. Her questions were answered and she brought her dress out. How wonderful that she had the faith in Creator that she could hear and accept the messages sent to her. I'm so proud of her.

We ended up not having Lodge Sunday, like we'd intended. I can't explain it. First our firekeeper called and said he was not in a good place emotionally and felt he should not be doing anything related to ceremony. Cecil has been feeling poorly; ankles swelling....he's finally agreed to see our Dr....and he even said he'd not stay in 4 doors and that David would need to conduct. David was not able to pour - he was an emotional mess....it was a weird start to the day. Each of us women felt somewhat reserved about it, too. Usually there's excitement and we all look forward to it. Usually can't wait to get started! We decided to postpone the ceremony, but still gather and enjoy fellowship and laugh and eat and just sing and drum. It turned out to be the perfect day and it was just what we needed to do. We women sat down by the lodge and laughed and told stories and just enjoyed the company of each other.

Thank you, Wakan Tanka for being all, for knowing all. Thank you for allowing us the ability to hear you and, most importantly, to listen when you let us know what we need to do. Thank you, Wakan Tanka for loving us as you do.
Aho.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/19/09 12:52 AM

Phyllis suggested I share some storied about my friend, (sister, teacher, Elder) Panther, who walked on last September. I loved her unconditionally and she returned that love to me and to David. We will miss her for as long as we live, but we know for a fact that she still comes to us for a visit now and again. One of the most outstanding qualities Panther possessed was her completely humble nature. Another one was her incredible sense of humor. She was always able to laugh at herself and never take herself so seriously that she couldn't enjoy life; even when she was so sick. I'll share some of the funny Panther stories - one at a time, every now and again as they come back to me.

Her husband was diabetic. He had diabetes as a child and by the time he was in his late 30's he required a multi-organ transplant. The diabetes has taken it's toll on his eyesight, but the transplants were an enormous success. It's been over 10 years now and he's doing fine. But, he really does have a difficult time seeing, even with his very thick eye glasses.

Even though she worried about him and fussed over him she used to play tricks on him and use his bad eyesight to her advantage when she was aggravated with him.

I remember one time, after a long day of drumming and singing at powwow, they'd had some words and while they were on their way back to their tent she decided to 'git 'im back'. She'd usually take the lead after dark since he couldn't see so well. This particular evening on their way back to camp she decided to take a 'detour' and led him under the low hanging awning of another's camper. Of course, she ducked down to miss hitting her head. John wacked his head twice as he passed through and had to follow Panther's cackeling the rest of the way back to their camp.

As I read through this, I realize it won't be as funny to folks reading it as it was to those who witnessed it or to those of us who heard the two of them telling the story. There's always something lost in the translation.

She was an imp. Always smiling, always sharing, always ready to do without so others in need could have enough. I never thought SHE had enough - maybe I just had too much. I love you, Panther and I miss you.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/19/09 05:21 PM

It sounds like Panther was not only a loving person, but had a great sense of humour. It is sad when a loved one passes. I still miss my Father who passed over many years ago, and my brother who walked on just two years ago. But, the memories a loved one leaves us with is a treasure. I will miss my dear brother-in-law who just left us on Saturday. We are at the stage where we can sit around, gather in love and talk about the memories.

Thank you for sharing about Panther.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/20/09 04:49 PM

I love the stories that you all share here at the Campfire.

When I did an article on pottery some time ago, I fell in love with the "Storytellers", pottery statues. Here is a really cute one:

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/26/09 01:00 AM

Phyllis,
Is it Zuni? Dine? Who traditionally makes the storyteller statues?

We were finally blessed with a rain shower this evening. Just a light to medium steady rain. David says when it rains like this it sounds like the trees are applauding. It really does. It rained for about an hour when we began hearing slow, low, rolling thunder. Cecil said that the Grandfathers were visiting. That you can always tell it's the Grandfathers by the gentle thunder. He said that when the Warriors visit the thunder is loud and booms! I can almost hear it from memory.

I love to go to the garage and just sit with Cecil. If I sit long enough and don't initiate a conversation, he'll start talking about his childhood, his parents...things they did. And he'll talk about his journey to his current 'position' (for lack of a WAY better word).

He'll be leaving Thursday. We're all having a difficult time dealing with it. I'm pretending he ISN'T leaving. I'm so good at sticking my head in the sand. Anyway.....he's considering coming back here before Sundance so he can share the driving with David. My fingers are crossed. I really can't voice an opinion because it is very difficult for him to decide what to do. So many people want a little piece of him and we've been so blessed that he's been here for as long as he has been. I can't say anything that will influence his decision.

Panther was always very connected to the Thunder Beings. She respected them verrrry much. Once though, during kids camp, the Thunders came and she was disappointed that it was storming and the kids couldn't do the activity that was planned. She went outside and faced them - she scolded them and told them to come another time; I believe she even raised her fist at them. She learned real quick that was the wrong thing to do. She was pelted with a wind and rain that nearly knocked her down. She said she'd never seen such a storm. After the storm she went back out and offered tobacco and prayed an apology. She'd been struck 2 or 3 times by lightening over the years. The lightening strikes happened before this incident, not because of it. After the kids camp incident, she'd just shake her head when she'd tell the story and say "I don't know what I was thinking. They reminded me that their power and strength is awesome and demands respect".

Well, I guess that's all I have to share this evening.
Good evening to you all and may you all have a blessed evening and sweet dreams.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 05/26/09 05:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Connidee
Phyllis,
Is it Zuni? Dine? Who traditionally makes the storyteller statues?


It is the southwest pueblo tribes, which would include the Zuni and the Dine', who make these lovely statues. I wrote a book review on the beautiful pottery made by women in these areas. You can read the review at:

Pottery By Native American Women

Here is another link to Storytellers:

Storytellers

Pueblo Storytellers
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/10/09 05:50 PM

Here is another pottery storyteller, in a Pueblo:



from:

First People
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/10/09 06:27 PM

Originally Posted By: Phyllis, NA and Folk
Here is another pottery storyteller, in a Pueblo:



from:

First People


I like this peice better than the first. This one looks functional. Is it a candle holder or a bowl?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/10/09 06:50 PM

I am not sure. It does kind of look like a candle holder. That would be very appropriate - to have a flame in the center, like a campfire. I would love to have one like that.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 06/20/09 04:49 PM

Do not forget - Father's Day is this Sunday. Remember to honor your Father and any fathers you know - brothers, uncles, cousins, nephews, friends, etc. Here is a message I wrote to my father:

Message To My Father
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/01/09 04:54 PM

Native American Prayer

Oh our Mother the Earth, Oh our Father the Sky,
Your children are we, and with tired backs
We bring you the gifts you love.
Then weave for us a garment of brightness;

May the Warp be the white light of the morning,
May the weft be the red light of the evening,
May the fringes be the falling rain,
May the border be the standing rainbow.

Thus weave for us a garment of brightness,
That we may walk fittingly where birds sing,
That we may walk fittingly where grass is green,
Oh our Mother Earth, Oh our Father Sky.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/03/09 01:38 AM

Early today I saw two large Eagles soaring up, up, into the bright blue sky, with huge, fluffy white clouds drifting across the sky. It inspired me to write a song.

Ancient Cloud People,
Drifting across Grandfather Sky.
Grandfather Sun sending His light
To Grandmother Earth,
To Grandmother Earth.
Eagle soaring up to Grandfather Sun,
Soaring up to Grandfather Sun,
Taking prayers to Great Spirit.
Taking our prayers to Great Spirit
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 07/07/09 08:32 PM

A Native American prayer for a lost loved one:
from The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 1943:


I give you this
One thought to keep.
I am with you still.
I do not sleep...
I am the soft stars
That shine at night...
Do not think of me as gone
I am with you still,
In each new dawn...

In one of the stars
I shall be living
In one of them
I shall be laughing
And so it will be
As if all the stars
Where laughing
When you look
At the sky at night
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/25/09 02:24 PM

I welcome all to the Campfire. Here is where each has a turn to take the talking stick and share with others.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/27/09 11:58 PM

It has been a long time since I visited the campfire. May I take the talking stick?

It's been a beautiful summer here, in Ohio. Very few oppressively humid days. A lot of rain, for which I am very grateful and many, many warm, breezy days.

The eagles visited often this summer. Mostly when Cecil is here - not so much when he's not. However, for about 2 weeks a pair of parent eagles spent everyday teaching their young ones to hunt. I could hear eagles calling everyday for many days. I can't describe the thrill. Often times I could hear them but not see them, then one day I saw all 5 of them circling; two adults and three juveniles. It was a very special gift. It's unusual for a pair to have 2 eggs and both chicks survive, but to have THREE chicks survive is nearly impossible. We've been blessed.

Over the months I've developed very special and true friendships with two ladies who are involved with this forum. Another blessing.

My David and I were invited to go to a Sundance at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. That was a wonderful experience. The sky there is so different than the sky here, in Ohio. We camped for several days and each night the Thunders came with lightening and big winds. (I need to write a letter to the Eureka! tent company and tell them what a good tent they make. It withstood the winds and we stayed dry....mostly.) The days were sunny and clean. I understand why the Lakota People love their prairies. I can't describe what it is like to sit in the middle of a great big field of sage. The fragrance is intoxicating.

We set up camp under an ancient cottonwood tree. Someone had leaned several tipi lodge poles up against a low lying branch and the children used them as a slide. I'll never know how they managed to avoid splinters in their heinies.

Many nights we heard the coyotes.....sounded like they were pretty close. We don't hear them in Ohio anymore. In Ohio it is open season all year round for coyotes with no limit. It makes me sick. We also heard herds of cattle and horses running through the camp at night and could see them during the day. It was surreal watching the horses running through the prairie. I felt like I'd been sent back into the century that I belong.

Now, we're home and back to work. The birds still wake me at 6:30; I still go to the garage and have my coffee while I watch the sun come up and burn off the fog. But it's not the same. My heart is still in South Dakota. I left it there on purpose. Now, I have to go back next year......
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/28/09 12:23 AM

Conni, thank you for your beautiful description. Through your words, we all can share a bit of the experience.

My Mother visited Pine Ridge for the Rodeo and Pow-Wow a few years back. Hopefully I'll be able to visit some day myself.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/28/09 05:35 PM

Connidee, your words bring the profound beauty of the Sundance and the life in Nature to us all. Thank you so much for sharing.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/29/09 06:24 PM

It has been a long time since I, too, visted the campfire.

I so enjoyed reading about your experience with the Eagles, Conni. Just yesterday my dear friend, who lives just a couple blocks from me, sent me a picture of an Eagle that was picking up a squirrel from the road right in front of her home.
I felt so bad for the little squirrel, who must have been hit by a vehicle, but loved seeing the Majestic Eagle! He brought to mind a little poem:

SOAR LIKE AN EAGLE

MAY YOUR SPIRIT SOAR LIKE AN EAGLE
RIDING THE MORNING BREEZE
MAY YOUR JOY RUN STRONG AND WIDE AND DEEP
AS THE WAVES OF THE SACRED SEAS
MAY YOUR SOUL EMBRACE BOTH EARTH AND SKY
AND GUIDE YOU TRULY AS THE YEARS GO BY
MAY YOUR HEART BE STRONG THROUGH ALL LIFE'S TESTS
AND ALWAYS AND FOREVER MAY YOU BE BLESSED


Lovely, isn't it?

I am so pleased to see my old friends still here keeping the campfire going! Blessings to you, Phyllis.

Until another time:

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastelaka,
Kimi Kaya



Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Hello Place... - 08/30/09 01:07 PM

Kimi Kaya, it is always so good to hear from you. I feel you have a sweet and gentle spirit. You go away for such long times! I hope things have been good for you in the time you've been away.

The poem is beautiful. Thank you for sharing it with all of us.
Conni
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 08/31/09 02:14 AM

Kimi Kaya, Cante Etanhan Owoglake (speaking from the heart)is what you do so well. Thank you for the beautiful poem. It lifts my spirits.

Conni, you also lift my spirits with your lovely words and your Eagles - thank you so much for sharing that with us.

Both of you are so in touch with Nature and seem to be walking in Harmony and Balance. Walk in Peace and Beauty.

Cante etanhan Owoglake, I send Wowastelaka (love) and blessings to you both.

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/06/09 07:38 PM

Winter time will be upon us before we know it. Enjoy your days of Summer and the Autumn warmth. Gather together your stories and share them with us this winter as we draw closer to the fire within us all.
Posted By: kimikaya

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/21/09 07:16 PM

Wopila Tanka for your kind words, Conni. It is my 'beading' that keeps me away for long periods. If it is not in actual design and beading, then it is spending much time collecting patterns and such on the computer. I find I love every facet of it!

But, I do like to stop by the campfire to see how my fiends are, and what they are up to. If they are well and happy, then so am I.

And to you, Phyllis: Cante Waste Nape Ciyu Zapo, I greet you from my heart. Just a little different than what you have written. It is true, I am very much 'into' nature and all that Mother Earth offers us.

Along those same lines, something I read today that spoke to me.

Black Elk and his Thoughts About 'Trees'.

Can there be anything more beautiful than the seasons of a tree? A tree stands in beauty from year to year and keeps its grace and dignity. Its secrets are at its center and it tells nothing of people and their passing events. We learn when we watch a tree. It constantly prunes itself, continually sheds any excess. When it is growing in a difficult place it sends down deep roots to grapple for a firm footing. Every leaf is unique and beautiful - but they also serve to remove toxic poisons from the atmosphere, and send out a clean fragrance to shade us from heat. To sit beneath a tree, or to lie on the earth beneath an oak is the essence of pleasure. But to see the topmost leaves that no human hand has ever touched is to see a common miracle - a miracle with a message that says to get a firm footing in everything that is good and stand tall with our eye on the sky.

~ It may be that some little root of the sacred tree still lives. ~


I love trees and very much liked what Black Elk wrote.

I shall now pass the talking stick on and say to all:

Wakan Tanan Kici Un.
Wowastelaka,
Kimi Kaya

Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/21/09 08:28 PM

Beautiful words. I love the trees, too. I've often thought that if I were an artist it would be the trees that I'd draw. Only the trees. My favorite is the American Sycamore, I think.

You're a beader? May ask a question? Do you have any advise on sewing cowrie shells to fabric? I'm driving myself crazy trying to sew cowries to the top and sleeves of my dress. I doesn't seem like it should be so much trouble; maybe my fingers are just clumsy from inexperience. My patience is growing thin. This dress is going to require serious smudging when I'm done with it.

Do you set up a booth and sell your work at powwows? Can you post any pictures? I'd love to see your work.
(that's okay, isn't it Phyllis?)

blessings to you,
Conni


Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/21/09 10:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Connidee

Do you set up a booth and sell your work at powwows? Can you post any pictures? I'd love to see your work.
(that's okay, isn't it Phyllis?)

blessings to you,
Conni




Of course that is ok, Conni. We share so much of so many topics here at the Campfire. We could open another thread - something like "My Special Craft" to share with all, then talk about how this craft or artwork makes us feel, etc, and share pictures. That would be a fun thread to post in and read.

The Campfire Circle is for all to share whatever is on their minds. I would love to see your beadwork also, Kimi.
Posted By: Connidee

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/21/09 11:18 PM

That would be fun. Great idea Phyllis. Were you a school teacher?
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/22/09 06:22 PM

No - I was never a school teacher, Conni. I did participate in a co-op preschool with my children when they were little, but that was as close as I ever came to being a teacher.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 09/30/09 02:41 AM

Welcome to the Campfire. Dance with us in the Circle of Life. Blessings to all.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/07/09 02:24 PM

The cold weather and holidays are coming upon us quickly. If you had a bountiful harvest, please share with the less fortunate. Remember the children on the reservations and that they will need warm clothing for these cold months.

I know some of you knit or crochet scarves, hats and mittens to send to reservations and that is wonderful.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/07/09 02:34 PM

Finished up scarf #74 last night and started #75. I'm well on my way to making my goal of 100 hat/scarf sets for the Christmas Party at St Labre Indian School in Montana.

We didn't have much money to donate this year, but I did have a bunch of yarn leftovers. Once family and friends learned of my project, more yarn got donated. And it keeps coming from all over. I have had so much fun with this, designing the sets and learning new stitches. Each set is unique, and I hope the children will enjoy their warmth as much as I have enjoyed making them.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/08/09 03:00 AM

Wonderful! You are so dedicated to your missions, Icp. What a gal!
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/22/09 02:18 PM

Hello everyone, my apologies for being away so long. We had a great time at our Tribal Family Day, this past weekend. My little craft table raised $20 in donations, but more importantly, the kids had a great time making something to remember the day by. I was so pleased there were several activities for the children. They had a potato dance and a candy dance. Our Children are our Future. It's so important to keep them engaged and involved in our Culture.

One young man was working on a craft project and commented "I like this one better!" Confused, I asked him what did he like better. "THIS family reunion, I like it much better!" That one comment made all my efforts worth every moment of preparation.

Of course, the covered dish meal was outstanding. My husband lamented he only had one stomach. But his raffle ticket luck was in high gear. My daughter and I both won chokers, my Mother a walking stick, and the 4th winning ticket out of only 10, he gave to a child. She was so excited to win something.

The weather was beautiful and I hope word gets out to more Tribal members of the varying activities so our attendance will increase. We did have more children than in the past, but then, that was skewed a bit, as the Chief's Granddaughters were able to attend, a set of identical QUADS!

The only downside, and the reason I've been away from the forum, I brought home a nasty cold. It's trying hard to get into my chest, and I'm fighting it hard.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/23/09 08:04 PM

Sounds like you all had a great time, Icp. Wish I could have been there. You are so right - our children are our future and we should endeavor to make sure Mother Earth is protected for them.

I love crafts and involving children in them. Kids can come up with some pretty good ideas if given the right tools. You must have worked hard for this special day. I always admire your dedication and perserverance. Sounds like it paid off.

Thanks for sharing this special day with us.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/29/09 03:22 AM

This time of year is when we think more often of family and close friends because the busy times of summer are winding down and holidays are coming up. Remember your loved ones near and far and keep in touch.

To all my forum members who visit here at the Campfire Circle I send prayers for health, peace and joy. May your moccasins lead you back here often to share stories, poems, songs and time together.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 10/29/09 04:53 PM

Coyote and the origin of Death
A Caddo Legend

In the beginning of this world, there was no such thing as death. Everybody continued to live until there were so many people that the Earth had no room for any more.

The chiefs held a council to determine what to do. One man rose and said he thought it would be a good plan to have the people die and be gone for a little while, and then return.

As soon as he sat down, Coyote jumped up and said he thought people ought to die forever. He pointed out that this little world is not large enough to hold all of the people, and that if the people who died came back to life, there would not be food enough for all.

All the other men objected. They said that they did not want their friends and relatives to die and be gone forever, for then they would grieve and worry and there would be no happiness in the world.

Everyone except Coyote decided to have people die and be gone for a little while, and then come back to life again. The medicine men built a large grass house facing the East. When they had completed it, they called the men of the tribe together and told them that people who died would be restored to life in the medicine house. The chief medicine man explained that they would sing a song calling the spirit of the dead to the grass house. When the spirit came, they would restore it to life.

All the people were glad, because they were anxious for the dead to come and live with them again. When the first man died, the medicine men assembled in the grass house and sang.

In about ten days a whirlwind blew from the West and circled about the grass house. Coyote saw it, and as the whirlwind was about to enter the house, he closed the door. The spirit of the whirlwind, finding the door closed, whirled on by.

In this way Coyote made death eternal, and from that time on, people grieved over their dead and were unhappy.

Now whenever anyone meets a whirlwind or hears the wind whistle, he says: "Someone is wandering about." Ever since Coyote closed the door, the spirits of the dead have wandered over the Earth trying to find some place to go, until at last they discovered the road to the spirit land.

Coyote ran away and never came back, for when he saw what he had done, he was afraid. Ever after that, he has run from one place to another, always looking back first over one shoulder and then over the other to see if anyone is pursuing him. And ever since then he has been starving, for no one will give him anything to eat.

Retrieved with permission from FirstPeople.US
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 11/03/09 05:18 PM

The Elders have given us so much. Remember them during this winter and give back to them whatever they may need. Their smile of thanks and the warm glow in their eyes will be your reward.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 01/27/10 03:19 PM

As Black Elk often said, all life, all Creation, is a circle - from birth to death and birth again. Our campfire is a circle where we all come as friends to share, support, tell stories, pray and just chat.

I will be away from the forum for a few weeks but will leave my blanket at the campfire to show that I will return to the circle to share with all friends. Walk in Beauty.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 01/30/10 05:25 PM

Phyllis, we'll keep your blanket warm until your return. I hope everything goes well this weekend and in the weeks to follow. Maybe when you return you can post a picture of your beloved mountain.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/01/10 04:34 PM

Yes, I will help to keep the fire burning brightly in he campfire. Good luck with the move Phyllis and hurry back.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/01/10 09:01 PM

Worked all day Sunday at the Cherokee of Georgia Tribal Grounds. Jan 21st a small tornado hit in the evening. We're so thankful for no injuries. RV's don't fair well in that weather and 4 trees totalled the Chief's. All the permanent structures and the boardwalk in the swamp were completely untouched, but a few lodges were destroyed.

We spent the day cutting down damaged trees and hauling debris. On the positive side, we've got additional cleared areas for campsites and plenty of firewood for the April Pow-Wow. They're bringing in a chipper this week to salvage the limbs for ground cover.

Tribal members, friends and family have come in from all over to help with the clean up and no one has been injured. We were out of town when it hit, and it rained all day this past Saturday. But we'll be returning this weekend, which gives me time to work out the sore muscles. Prayers for good weather and continued safety would be most graciously appreciated.
Posted By: Vance - Crime Editor

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/05/10 02:19 PM

Originally Posted By: lcp012586
We spent the day cutting down damaged trees and hauling debris. On the positive side, we've got additional cleared areas for campsites and plenty of firewood for the April Pow-Wow. They're bringing in a chipper this week to salvage the limbs for ground cover.
Prayers for good weather and continued safety would be most graciously appreciated.


Well at least something good came from a tragedy. Thankfully no one was hurt. I will pray for good weather and continued safety for everyone.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/05/10 03:58 PM

Thank You Vance. I really appreciate your thoughts and prayers. We'll be returning Sunday if the weather holds. The weekend of Valentine's Day is the monthly Camp Meeting. We have never attended, as we are not Tribal members. However, I was chided (and invited) in November by the Chief's wife and by another Elder this past weekend for not attending.

My husband and I have said numerous times it feels like we're being adopted. Being invited to the Camp Meeting, I guess that's "unofficially" official now. My Tribal family is in South Carolina. By SC law, I can only be a member of one Tribe. But it is so nice to have a local Tribal family, even if it's not official, and that's truly irrelevant anyway.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/10/10 02:51 AM

We are making great progress on the storm clean up at the Tribal Grounds. A Tribal member has a lumber mill and several truck/trailer loads have been delivered. I don't know what is planned for the lumber, but there will be a ton of it, several tons actually. There was a pile of sticks and limbs as big as a house in the parking lot. The chipping was completed Sunday afternoon.

It will be a month or more before the Sweat Lodge can be rebuilt. It was completely destroyed. But we have to wait until it warms up and the sap starts rising. I hope I'll be there that day to watch and learn.

It's so hard to drive down for the day and have to return home in the evening. I can't wait for April and a whole week on that Sacred Ground.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/10/10 09:24 PM

My prayers are sent your way, lcp. I am glad everyone is ok. It is so wonderful to hear that everyone is coming together to help and support each other. Take care. I will tie some prayer ties on my tree for all of you.

I have settled into my new home and all is well, except I have no computer. I can only get to the library to use their computer about once a week.

My new home is very peaceful and spiritual for me. It is at the foot of a mountain range that is covered with sage, big rocks and many, many critters. I have not heard the cougar yet, but, I know he lives up there somewhere. There are jack rabbits, squirrels, quail, and hawks galore. I sit on my patio and can watch the animals and birds busy at their day.

I will leave my blaket here at the campfire to let you know I will be back. Thank you, Vance and lcp for taking the Talking Stick and for keeping the campfire burning brightly.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/10/10 09:26 PM

Originally Posted By: lcp012586
Phyllis, we'll keep your blanket warm until your return. I hope everything goes well this weekend and in the weeks to follow. Maybe when you return you can post a picture of your beloved mountain.


lcp, I have taken several pics of my beloved mountain and definitely will post one as soon as I can. Thanks for keeping my blanket warm. smile

Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/10/10 10:41 PM

So glad to have you back, even if it's just a pop-in for now. I can't wait to see a picture of your mountain and for you to get back on-line at home. I feel that will be soon.

We're all gathered on your blanket, keeping it warm.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/14/10 02:43 PM

We're on our way to the Tibal Grounds this morning. My boss wanted a float built for the Mardi Gras parade, so I had to miss the Camp Meeting. I know I'll be fussed at when we arrive, but I'm bringing lunch for everyone.

We've had some substantial winds this past week. No doubt there will be another ton of sticks to pick up, and much more raking. But we're getting close. April seems "months" away, but it's only a few short weeks. Preparing for Pow-Wow week is hectic enough without a tornado thrown into the mix. We'll be ready and I've already started my prayers for wonderful weather and good attendance.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/19/10 06:47 PM

lcp, every time I read your posts I am amazed at how much you do and how busy your life is. You always seem to have time to help when Mother Earth calls. Here is a prayer for you and all who work to protect Mother Earth:


Indian Prayer
Oh our Mother the earth, Oh our Father the sky,
Your children are we, and with tired backs
We bring you the gifts you love.
Then weave for us a garment of brightness;

May the Warp be the white light of the morning,
May the weft be the red light of the evening,
May the fringes be the falling rain,
May the border be the standing rainbow.

Thus weave for us a garment of brightness,
That we may walk fittingly where birds sing,
That we may walk fittingly where grass is green,
Oh our Mother Earth, Oh our Father Sky.

(prayer retrieved from: First People
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/20/10 12:41 AM

Phyllis, That is so lovely and so timely. Just finished up researching some "fabric" for my daughter's wedding. I know it will come to me soon.

My "circles" have been short and wonderful of late, finding the items needed to make my daughter's wedding wonderful, easily and affordably. I have such a long list of things to be thankful for, your name included.

This past weekend I was in the library at the Tribal Grounds, sorting donations for the bunkhouse. There is a T style dress hanging on the wall, just like the one I want to make with the leather I got in October. I can't wait to get started next month.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 02/26/10 03:01 AM

An old Dakota saying is:

We will be known forever by the tracks we leave.

You are leaving good tracks, lcp.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 03/04/10 11:41 PM

The Great Spirit is in all things, he is in the air we breathe. The Great Spirit is our Father, but the Earth is our Mother. She nourishes us, that which we put into the ground she returns to us....

Big Thunder (Bedagi) - Wabanaki
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 03/13/10 02:01 AM

Whirlwind and Panther

Long ago, in a Seneca village, a party of men was preparing to go on a hunting expedition. In that village was a young man whom people thought was foolish, not strong of mind. He knew that hunters were getting ready for an expedition and he went to them and asked to go with them, but no one would let him go.

After the hunters started a young woman took pity on the young man, went to him, and said, "Let us marry and go hunting." He was willing. They started off together and after going some distance camped in the forest. The man couldn't find any big game, but he killed squirrels and small game. He made traps to catch deer and put them down where he thought deer would come.

One morning, when the young man went to look at his traps, he heard some one crying; the sound came nearer and nearer. Soon he saw a woman and two little boys. The woman was crying.

As she came up she said to the young man, "Help me, or we will be killed. One of my little boys stole a feather and pulled it to bits and we are going to be killed for it. I want you to shoot the hawk on that tree over there and when the person comes whose feather my little boy took, throw the hawk at him and call out, 'Here is your feather!'"

The man killed the hawk and no sooner had he done so than he heard a terrible roar and noise, and trees began to fall. A man came and stood on a tree close by. This man had enormous eyes and long hair, and that was all there was of him, just a great head without a body. The young man threw the hawk at him, and said, "Here is your feather." The Head caught it, said, "Thank you," and was satisfied.

The woman was a panther and the children were her cubs, but to the young man she appeared to be a real woman. She told him that she lived among the rocks and that the Head (Whirlwind) was her neighbor. While he was away from home, her little boy went to his cabin, found his feathers and spoiled one of them. When Whirlwind came home he was angry and chased her.

She told the young man that she knew he was poor, that no man would hunt with him, and she said, "Hereafter I will help you and you will get more game than any of the hunters, I do this because you saved me and my boys."

After that the young man killed more game than any other hunter in the village.



Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: The Campfire Circle - 03/29/10 05:19 PM

We're leaving for Pow-Wow in a little while. Everyone have a great week
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: The Campfire Circle - 03/29/10 07:12 PM

Have a wonderful time, lcp! Be safe.

We will keep the campfire going and keep your place warm.
Posted By: Hopey Whisperwind

Re: Reach Out To The Youth - 04/02/10 05:58 AM

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 04/02/10 05:39 PM

Welcome to our Native American forum Campfire, Hopey. That is an interesting story.
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: Campfire Circle - 04/05/10 02:46 PM

Back from Pow-Wow and the weather was wonderful! Warm days and cool nights with a nice breeze the whole week. Attendance was down with the economy the way it is. The vendors I talked with were understanding. Good food, friends, fellowship, dancing and weather. Couldn't ask for anymore!

Found the rest of the leather for my dress. We're nicknaming it "Coffee and Cream," the natural leather for the skirt really looks like cream, next to the coffee colored hides for the top. My daughter received more green leather for her fringe and got the top of her cape sewed. We're so thankful for the help from the vendors. They share knowledge and tips freely.

October will be the 30th Anniversary Pow-Wow, and I want to have my traditional dress completed. Just got home and already looking forward to next Pow-Wow.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 04/25/10 12:30 PM

When You Dance

When you dance
dance to thank the Great Spirit

When you dance
dance to heal Mother Earth

When you dance
dance to greet Grandfather Sun

When you dance
dance to welcome Grandmother Moon

When you dance
dance wih love in your heart
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 05/25/10 04:55 AM

When I sit around a campfire at night I love to listen to the sounds of the animals and other night creatures. I love to hear the voice of Creator in the gentle winds coming through the trees, or in the sound of the rushing creeks and rivers. I hear the voices of the Ancient Ones in the winds also; I see Grandmother Moon's stories in the clouds as they form visions of the past. It makes me feel so humble to connect with Creator and all Creation. It is peaceful and comforts me.

A Sioux Prayer
Translated by Chief Yellow Lark - 1887
Oh, Great Spirit, whose voice I hear in the winds
Whose breath gives life to the world, hear me
I come to you as one of your many children
I am small and weak
I need your strength and wisdom

May I walk in beauty
Make my eyes ever behold the red and purple sunset.
Make my hands respect the things you have made
And my ears sharp to your voice.
Make me wise so that I may know the things you have taught your children.

The lessons you have written in every leaf and rock
Make me strong--------!
Not to be superior to my brothers, but to fight my greatest enemy....myself

Make me ever ready to come to you with straight eyes,
So that when life fades as the fading sunset,
May my spirit come to you without shame.
(retrieved from First People )
Posted By: flower70

Re: Campfire Circle - 05/25/10 11:20 AM

That was wonderful, made my day thanks
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 05/25/10 02:49 PM

Your are most welcome, flower70. You are also welcome to this forum and I hope you return often to our Campfire and join other threads in the forum. Thank you.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 06/07/10 04:50 AM

When you were born, you cried
and the world rejoiced.
Live your life
so that when you die,
the world cries and you rejoice.

White Elk
Posted By: flower70

Re: Campfire Circle - 06/15/10 12:20 AM

You have such touching pieces of comment,love them.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 06/15/10 03:47 AM

Thank you flower70. I love the quotes, prayers and stories of Native American leaders of the past and often put them in this thread. Each quote or prayer is meaningful to someone in a special way.

Posted By: flower70

Re: Campfire Circle - 06/29/10 04:24 AM

Children Learn What They Live
If a child lives with criticism, he learns to condemn.
If a child lives with hostility, he learns to fight.
If a child lives with ridicule, he learns to be shy.
If a child lives with shame, he learns to feel quilty.
If a child lives with tolerance, he learns to be patient.
If a child lives with encouragement, he learns confidence.
If a child lives with praise, he learns to appreciate.
If a child lives with security, he learns to have faith.
If a child lives with fairness, he learns justice.
If a child lives with approval, he learns to like himself.
If a child lives with acceptance and friendship, he learns to find love in the world.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 07/09/10 07:56 AM

Great Spirit - I want no blood upon my land to stain the grass. I want it clear and pure, and I wish it so, that all who go through among my people may find it peaceful when they come, and leave peacefully when they go.

Ten Bears - Yamparika Comanche
Posted By: flower70

Re: Campfire Circle - 07/10/10 11:16 AM

That was a nice one Phyllis.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 07/18/10 04:33 PM

"Humankind has not woven the web of life. But we are one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together, all things connect."

Chief Seattle, Squamish Chief

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 08/04/10 09:58 PM

Grandfather, Great Spirit, as our dear brother walks on
Grant that he may follow the trail of peace,
And rest in the land of his ancestors,
And be in harmony at the campfire in Your spirit world.
Send strength and courage to his family who are grieving
And heal them, O' Great Spirit.

Grandfather, Great Spirit, hold up his beloved wife
And give her courage to walk Mother Earth in peace
Till she is once more beside her beloved husband
In Your world of eternal peace.
He was a good man on Earth and will be missed.
Yet we know he is safe in Your care.

Thank you, O' Great Spirit.


For Tim and Katie.
Posted By: flower70

Re: Campfire Circle - 08/05/10 12:19 PM

My condolence.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 08/06/10 05:07 PM

Thank you, flower.
Posted By: SoulSeeker

Re: Campfire Circle - 08/15/10 03:49 PM

There is something about gathering around a campfire that ignites the senses and brings me to a place of meditation almost instantly. Perhaps that stems from my Native American roots or it is something everyone experiences, I'm not sure. As a small child, I remember my grandmother telling me about my Indian heritage. The story was one of young love, courage and betrayal but it is from whence I came. My great-great grandfather met a beautiful Indian girl, the daughter of a medicine man, she was half his age. She fell in love with him but her father was furious. He kept her under close watch for months but whenever possible she would escape to visit her beloved suitor at the edge of the nearby town. When she told her father of her undying love for him, he vowed to kill him but she was able to persuade him against it because she was his only daughter. He loved her so much that he risked losing her by allowing her wishes to be granted. When my great-great grandfather and "Maw" could no longer endure the pain of being apart, they ran off together leaving her father angry, alone and hurt. As the years passed, Maw never returned to her Indian village nor did she have any contact with her father. After having children of her own and suffering the death of her beloved husband, she decided to return to the village to allow her children the opportunity to meet her father and to make peace in her heart with him. Upon her arrival she was met with harsh words from her former tribe. When her father approached her, she was excited and relieved to see he was still alive. Her joy was immediately turned to hurt when he told her to go away, she was no longer welcome in the village with her white children. The day she left the village, the elders agreed to banish her from the tribe. She fell to the ground pleading with him not to turn her away but he walked away leaving her sobbing as she clung to her children. Maw lived a very long healthy life. To all who knew her, she was "the Indian Princess". The love of her life was her children, whom she bore with the man she loved deeply enough to forsake all to be with. She was loved by many in her "white" world where she resided. Pictures of her portray a woman worn by the travails of life but her heart was tainted only twice. Once by the loss of her dear beloved husband and the second was because a father, whom she loved, shunned her because she followed her true heart.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 08/19/10 05:30 AM

Welcome to the Native American forum, SoulSeeker. Thank you for sharing that beautiful story with us.

Grandfather Great Spirit

All over the world the faces
of living ones are alike.

With tenderness they have
come up out of the ground.

Look upon your children
that they may face the winds
And walk the good road to the Day of Quiet.

Grandfather Great Spirit
Fill us with the Light.
Give us the strength to understand,
And the eyes to see.

Teach us to walk the soft Earth
As relatives to all that lives.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/02/10 02:32 AM

Eagle flies higher than any other bird
He brings messages to us from Creator
He takes our message and prayers back to Creator

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/02/10 02:47 AM

The following post is from one of our newest members, Teboe. It is so special I wanted to share it with those who visit the Campfire Circle. Teboe posted this in the "September 2010 NA Newsletter" thread:

Teboe
Newbie

Registered: 07/10/10
Posts: 2
As I read about the geese at the Nevada Territory Wild West Fair, I couldn't help but think of earlier this summer when the Standing Bear Council of IA/IL/MO came together to sing and dance for the Boy Scout Camporee held in Mt Pleasant IA. As the drummers were finishing the flag song, an eagle started circling the area. For most of the younger Scouts it was the first time they had seen an eagle. There was a moment of silence in the area followed by one call of the eagle and it flew away. I'm sure I wasn't the only one with chills in the moments that followed.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/19/10 10:04 PM

Can we talk of integration until there is integration of hearts and minds? Unless you have this, you only have a physical presence, and the walls between us are as high as the mountain range.

Chief Dan George, July 24, 1899�September 23, 1981
Posted By: SoulSeeker

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/21/10 03:53 AM

Thank you Phyllis. I need to make a correction to my story... it was my Great-Grandfather and Maw was my Great-Grandmother. I do not know what I was thinking when I put (Great-Great Grandfather)
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/22/10 05:55 AM

That is ok, SoulSeeker. We all make a mistake once in a while. It is still a really great and beautiful story. I am so glad you shared it with us.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 09/24/10 06:59 PM

It was our belief that the love of possessions is a weakness to be overcome. Its appeal is to the material part, and if allowed its way, it will in time disturb one's spiritual balance. Therefore, children must early learn the beauty of generosity. They are taught to give what they prize most, that they may taste the happiness of giving.

If a child is inclined to be grasping, or to cling to any of his or her little possessions, legends are related about contempt and disgrace falling upon the ungenerous and mean person ...

The Indians in their simplicity literally give away all that they have - to relatives, to guests of other tribes or clans, but above all to the poor and the aged, from whom they can hope for no return.


Charles Alexander Eastman (Ohiyesa) 1858 - 1939, Santee Sioux


Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 10/23/10 06:00 PM

Spirit of the Drum

It is said that when Creator was giving a place for all the spirits to dwell who would be taking part in the inhabitance of Mother Earth, there came a sound, a loud BOOM, from off in the distance.

As Creator listened, the sound kept coming closer and closer until it finally it was right in front of Creator. "Who are you?" asked Creator. "I am the spirit of the drum" was the reply. I have come here to ask you to allow me to take part in this wonderful thing." "How will you take part?" Creator questioned." I would like to accompany the singing of the people. When they sing from their hearts, I will to sing as though I was the heartbeat of Mother Earth. In that way, all creation will sing in harmony. "Creator granted the request, and from then on, the drum accompanied the people's voices.

The Spirit of the Drum is the heartbeat of Mother Earth. Eagle comes to Drum and takes the messages of the people to Creator.

Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 11/15/10 01:30 AM

Hold on to what is good even if it is a handful of earth.
Hold on to what you believe even if it is a tree which stands by itself.
Hold on to what you must do even if it is a long way from here.
Hold on to life even when it is easier letting go.
Hold on to my hand even when I have gone away from you."

~Pueblo Blessing ~
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 02/21/11 04:06 AM

I was looking out on the little mountain this morning. It is so
beautiful with snow covering it. The sun was shining down on
the snow and it glistened like someone had scattered diamonds
all over it.

As I was admiring the beauty, I noticed several little trails of
tracks where the rabbits had been traveling back and forth.
Soon I saw a jack rabbit following his trail. He kept stopping
to listen to something. Before long I saw a squirrel following
the rabbit. It made me think that a little story about them
would be fun.

So, now I am trying to think of a story titled: Rabbit and Squirrel. Hmmm... if I come up with one, I will post it here.
Posted By: Phyllis Doyle Burns

Re: Campfire Circle - 02/23/11 06:59 PM

Indian Prayer
Chief Yellow Lark, Lakota

Oh, Great Spirit, whose voice I hear in the winds.
And whose breath gives life to all the world.
Hear me! I am small and weak.
I need your strength and wisdom.
Let me walk in beauty, and make my eyes
Ever hold the red and purple sunset.
Make my hands respect the things you have made.
My ears sharp to hear your voice.
Make me wise so that I may understand
The things you might teach me.
Let me learn the lessons you have hidden
In every leaf and rock.
I seek strength, not to be greater than my brother.
But to fight my greatest enemy, myself.
Make me always ready to come to you
With clear hands and straight eyes.
So when life fades, as the fading sunset.
My spirit may come to you without shame.


Retrieved from: First People of US and Canada
Posted By: Jane - Native American

Re: Campfire Circle - 02/23/11 09:07 PM

I was cleaning out a box the other day and found the program for the Cherokee of Georgia 25th Children's Pow-Wow. It included several pages of suggested reading, grouped by age.

I have to find this book of essays.
Funny You Don't Look Like One: Observations from a Blue-Eyed Ojibway by Drew Hayden Taylor

Here's the quote:
"I've spent too many years explaining who and what I am repeatedly, so as of this moment, I officially secede from both races. I plan to start my own separate nation. Because I am half Ojibway and half Caucasion, we will be called the Occasions. And of course, since I'm founding the new nation, I will be a Special Occasion."
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