logo
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6
#932908 08/01/20 05:46 AM
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Maria Mitchell - born on August 1, 1818 in Nantucket, Massachusetts - was a true pioneer woman. But she didn't brave a physical wilderness. Hers was the harder job of pioneering higher education for women. She was the first American woman to discover a comet, the first to be elected to scientific societies, and the first woman professor of astronomy.

Maria Mitchell

In her own words, America's first woman professor of astronomy tells of her meetings with the great and good of the nineteenth century. Maria Mitchell's sister Phebe collected excerpts from journals and letters to present a pot pourri of Maria's life, ideas and work.

Maria Mitchell - in Her Own Words



Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Sponsored Post Advertisement
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Sophia Brahe was born September 22, 1556 at Knudstrup, Sweden (which was at the time was still Danish). She was the younger sister of Tycho Brahe. Coming from a noble family, both were ostracized for their scientific pursuits which were deemed inappropriate, especially for a noblewomen.

Sophia was a horticulturalist, but also educated in classical literature and chemistry. She was self-educated in astronomy, and frequently assisted her brother with his astronomical observations at his observatory Uraniborg. On one occasion she helped with the observations Tycho used to compute the total lunar eclipse of 8 December 1573.


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Mae Jemison, born on October 17, 1956 is an extraordinarily talented woman.

As a NASA astronaut, she was the first African American woman in space. Before her time with NASA she had entered Stanford University at the age of 16 and four years later had degrees both in chemical engineering and African American studies. Jemison then went to Cornell University to complete a medical degree, following it up with some time as a general practitioner and then a medical officer with the Peace Corps in West Africa.

After leaving NASA, among her other accomplishments, she was for several years a professor of environmental studies at Dartmouth Collge and the director of the Jemison Institute for Advancing Technology in Developing Countries. She continues to advocate science education and encourage minority students.

Jemison is also a trained dancer and in this video The Cosmic Dance she explains why she thinks dance was helpful for her as an astronaut.



Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Henrietta Hill Swope was born on October 26, 1902 in St Louis, Missouri, USA. She got her master's degree in astronomy while working with Harlow Shapley, the director of the Harvard College Observatory.

Swopes's most important work was on variable stars, in particular Cepheid variables. Careful measurements of the variability of these stars made it possible to determine their distance. (This understanding was based on the work of Henrietta Leavitt who had previously worked at the Harvard College Observatory.)

In 1952, Swope went to California to work with Walter Baade on the variable stars detected by the new 200-inch Hale Telescope at Mount Palomar. It was owned by the Carnegie Institution. The largest telescope in the world (at that time) made it possible to use variable stars in other galaxies to determine their distances. She spent the rest of her career working there.

Retirement didn't end her contributions to astronomy. She had family money, and donated a large sum to the Carnegie Institution to develop optical astronomy facilities in the southern hemisphere. The Swope Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile is still in use. When she died, she left most of her estate to support Las Campanas.


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Eileen Collins, the first woman to pilot the Space Shuttle and the first to command a shuttle, was born on November 19, 1956.

In addition to being an Air Force test pilot and flight instructor, she has degrees from four different universities. This includes two masters degrees, one in operations research and one in space systems management. Collins was selected as an astronaut candidate in 1990. She flew four shuttle missions, including one that involved a docking with Russia's Mir space station.




Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

American astronomer Eleanor Frances Helin was born on November 19, 1932. For over thirty years, she pursued astronomy and planetary science, first at the California Institute of Technology and then NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In this photo Eleanor Helin is holding the discovery announcement of near-Earth asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom, which she discovered.

At Cal Tech she worked with Bruce Murray to start the Lunar Research Lab to study the Moon in preparation for lunar landings. From lunar craters, she went on to initiate an asteroid survey from Palomar Observatory. The program discovered thousands of asteroids plus a number of comets. Of particular interest to her were near-Earth asteroids. Having moved on to work at JPL, during the 1980s she encouraged global interest in asteroids and organized the International Near-Earth Asteroid Survey.

After 25 years of the Palomar survey, she went for upgraded technology in her Near Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT). It operated from JPL from 1997-2007, and it was the first automated observing program. As the principal investigator she was given the JPL Award for Excellence and her team received a Group Achievement Award from NASA.

Helin herself is credited with the discovery or co-discovery of nearly 900 asteroids plus several comets.


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Annie Jump Cannon, astronomer and suffragette, was born on December 11, 1863 in Dover, Delaware, USA.

Oh! Be a fine girl (guy)--kiss me! This is the traditional mnemonic for the star classification: OBAFGKM. Cannon devised the system and classified nearly a quarter of a million stellar spectra for the Henry Draper catalogue. She said that astronomical spectroscopy made it "almost as if the distant stars had acquired speech."

More about Annie Jump Cannon


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

Mary Somerville was an exceptional individual. Although self-educated and - as a woman - barred from higher education and membership in scientific societies, her books sold well and were used as textbooks for many decades.

She was born in Jedburgh, Scotland on 26 Dec 1780. Her family's idea of education for girls was needlework and drawing, not mathematics. In fact, Mary excelled at needlework and was an accomplished artist, but mathematics she learned by listening in on her brother's lessons, and from books. Her flair and love for mathematics led her later into the physical sciences.

Somerville taught herself French, and the first book she had published was an English translation and her own exposition of Laplace's work on celestial mechanics. It's a science classic, a highly mathematical discussion of the movements of bodies in the Solar System. She went on to write books that became textbooks on astronomy and on physical geography. Both the Royal Astronomical Society and the Royal Geographical Society gave her awards, even though, as a woman, she would not have been allowed to attend their meetings


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13

American astronomer Anne Sewell Young was born on January 2, 1871 in Bloomington, Wisconsin. In an era when it was difficult for women to pursue higher education – especially in the sciences – she obtained not only bachelor and masters degrees, but also earned a PhD in astronomy from Columbia.

Young worked at Mt Holyoke College in Massachusetts from 1899 to her retirement in 1936. She was a professor of astronomy and the director of the John Payson Williston Observatory. Highly regarded by her students, many of them also became astronomers.

In addition to her work as an educator, she was also a busy astronomer. Variable stars were her special interest and she was one of the original eight who founded the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), still a respected astronomical organization. Young contributed over 6500 variable star observations during her membership and served as the AAVSO's president in 1922-24.


Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
OP Offline
BellaOnline Editor
Iron Age Human
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 9,889
Likes: 13
Catherine Wolfe Bruce, born in New York City on January 22, 1816, was an amateur astronomer whose astronomical legacy was her patronage.

During the 1890s she made over 50 gifts to astronomy, including donating funds for the purchase of new telescopes for the Harvard College Observatory and Yerkes Observatory in the USA. But she also made a substantial grant to the Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory in the city of Heidelberg, Germany. It enabled the observatory to obtain a telescope designed for the sole purpose of astrophotography. It's known as the Bruce double astrograph. Her gifts overall totalled more than 3/4 of a million dollars, which would be a tidy sum even today.

Her name lives on in several ways other than the telescopes. There is also Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in recognition of lifetime achievements and contributions to astrophysics. It's one of the most prestigious awards in the field. Asteroid 323 Brucia is named for her, as well as a Bruce crater on the Moon.





Mona Evans
For news, activities, pictures and more, sign up to the Astronomy Newsletter!

http://www.bellaonline.com/newsletter/astronomy
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6

Moderated by  Mona - Astronomy 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Brand New Posts
2021: On this day . . .
by Mona - Astronomy - 09/18/21 03:26 PM
Death of an Old Tree
by Angie - 09/18/21 11:32 AM
Psalm for the day
by Angie - 09/18/21 09:50 AM
Inspiration Quote
by Angie - 09/18/21 08:50 AM
Lammas to the September Equinox – Quiz *new*
by Mona - Astronomy - 09/17/21 12:14 PM
Autumn Equinox
by Angie - 09/17/21 11:28 AM
When the burdens get heavy
by Angie - 09/15/21 03:17 PM
Sewing Projects for Fall
by Cheryl - Sewing Editor - 09/15/21 03:02 PM
QuickBooks Point of Sale (POS's) Best Customer Pho
by Penelope Jerez - 09/14/21 06:21 PM
Astro Women - Birthdays
by Angie - 09/14/21 08:25 AM
Sponsor
Safety
We take forum safety very seriously here at BellaOnline. Please be sure to read through our Forum Guidelines. Let us know if you have any questions or comments!
Privacy
This forum uses cookies to ensure smooth navigation from page to page of a thread. If you choose to register and provide your email, that email is solely used to get your password to you and updates on any topics you choose to watch. Nothing else. Ask with any questions!


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2021 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5