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Steve Cariddi on The Sky this Week
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The Moon will be new on Thursday, so early this week you'll see an old slim crescent Moon just before dawn, low in the east. On Tuesday morning, look for the Moon below bright Venus just before sunrise. At the same time, look for Jupiter high the south, and dimmer Saturn about one-third of the way between Jupiter and Saturn. By Sunday, you'll see a young slim crescent Moon just after sunset in the west. Also after sunset, look for Mars high in the west, just to the left (east) of the Pleiades star cluster. It's a good time to compare its red color to one of the reddest stars in the sky, Aldebaran, dimmer and about 10° to the left (east) of Mars.


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Steve Cariddi on The Sky this Week:
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The Moon is waxing this week, growing from a slim crescent to a gibbous phase by the end of the week. On Monday and Tuesday night, the Moon passes below and to the left (east) of Mars. It will be easy to spot the grouping as night falls. The crescent Moon will not be bright enough to drown out the stars of the Pleiades cluster (to the lower right of Mars), or the V-shaped Hyades cluster (just to the left of Mars). Reddish Aldebaran is the brightest star in the Hyades, and a worthy rival of ruddy Mars. Toward dawn, look for Jupiter and Saturn in the south. Jupiter is brighter and to the right of Saturn. Just before sunrise, Venus peeks up above the eastern horizon.


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EarthSky says:
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The moon is just a few days past full on the nights of April 21 and 22. Meanwhile, the Lyrid meteor shower is expected to put forth its greatest number of meteors during the predawn hours on April 22 and especially April 23. If you’re a veteran meteor-watcher, you’re already shaking your fist at the moon. Its glare will drown out all but the brightest Lyrids. However, the moon offers its own delights, sweeping past Jupiter – the largest planet in our solar system and second-brightest planet in our skies – on these mornings. Also, you can look for the bright star Vega, which nearly marks the radiant point of the Lyrid meteor shower. Both Jupiter and Vega should have no trouble overcoming the moon-drenched skies. Find them, enjoy them … and maybe you’ll spot a meteor, too!


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Royal Museums Greenwich tells us what to look out for in the sky during the month of May.


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Spring Astronomy Day is on May 11th.

Astronomy Day has been an annual celebration of astronomy for over forty years of "bringing astronomy to the people." See if you can find an event near you. If not, why not create your own event by skywatching with a friend - our Absolute Beginners guides can help you out.

Astronomy Day - Bringing Astronomy to the People


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Last night there was a full moon, this one named in some traditions as the Blue Flower full Moon. The photo was taken by Meredith Gertz in southern New Hampshire.


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Steve Cariddi tells us what to look out for this week:
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A new lunar month begins on Monday. The new Moon gradually moves eastward (toward the left) each night, and by Wednesday it should be visible in the west-southwest at nightfall, when it will be near Mars. By week's end it will be visible in the southwest before sunset. Jupiter and Saturn are rising around 9pm and 11pm respectively. Jupiter is heading toward opposition on the 10th, when it will be rising at sunset and visible all night. Around 3 or 4am, both planets are visible in the south.


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what a beautiful photo.

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There is a partial lunar eclipse tonight - a nice little commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11! Alas, besides only being partial, it won't be widely visible. But if you want to find out if you'll be able to see it, just check your location on timeanddate.com.


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