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I found this one today - it's a Scottish remake and is used for somebody who "talks foolishly at length!"

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Mug - a little word with so many and varied meanings.

I know it as (1) something I can drink my tea out of, (2) a fool, (3) someone's face, (4) to make silly faces, (5) to rob someone in a public place.

But the Oxford English Dictionary informs me of this meaning:
[‘ A mist, a fog; light rain or drizzle; a dull, damp, or gloomy atmosphere.’] I'd never heard that, but it's obviously related to muggy describing a hot really humid day.

How many of these did other people know?


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What was the Oxford English Dictionary's Word of the Year for 2015?


. . . . I think perhaps the end is truly nigh when even the OED abandons words for an emoji.


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I rather like the word quillet, but I think it's probably not a word in current use, even though quibble still is.

Wikipedia English explains it:
Quote:
Trivial objections (also referred to as hair-splitting, nothing but objections, barrage of objections and banal objections) is an informal logical fallacy where irrelevant and sometimes frivolous objections are made to divert the attention away from the topic that is being discussed. This type of argument is called a "quibble" or "quillet". Trivial objections are a special case of red herring.

Plenty of that around.


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A useful sort of word, but not one I've seen before: mattoid (n. & adj.)

It's a person "displaying erratic, eccentric, or somewhat paranoid behaviour".

Apparently, it's rare as an adjective meaning "displaying erratic behaviour".

I was going to say it applied to a lot of what you see on the Internet, but some of it is full-blow paranoid behaviour.


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Oxford sent me the word for today: rannygazoo. It means, they say, "Nonsense, deception; foolishness, fuss, exaggeration; (also) an instance of this; a prank, a trick." I guess it shounds like that kind of word. It lists it as British and US usage, and gives an example from a Canadian newspaper.

But my question is: Has anyone ever heard or seen this word used?

I certainly haven't. But I rather like it - it's sounds like what it is.


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ridibund, adj.
[‘ Inclined to laughter; happy, lively.’]

I think the word ridibund may make me ridibund.

Maybe it's because it seems to me a combination of ridiculous and moribund, which doesn't much make sense. Though, seriously, I think ridiculous might include the same root. Anybody know?


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I love this word!

I agree with your sentence, Mona!


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philodox, noun

The Oxford dictionary says it's "a person who loves or vehemently propounds his or her own opinions; a dogmatic or argumentative person."

We come across these folk a lot - especially in an election year.


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I've really taken to this word, can't wait to use it.

nullibiquitous, adj.

It means 'existing nowhere'.


It would describe nicely some children's homework.

Anymore suggestions for things that are nullibiquitous?


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Have you ever discovered that your version of a song's lyric is a bit different to the actual one? For example, a lot of people heard Police's "Message in a Bottle" as “A year has passed since I broke my nose.” But Police sang it as “A year has passed since I wrote my note.”

When this happens, it's known as a mondegreen.

It also applies to mishearing or misinterpreting words or phrases other than from songs.


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The OED offers the delightful word: quatsch (noun) - I like the sound of it.

They say it means nonsense or rubbish and is frequently used as an exclamation to express dismissal of a statement.

It could be very useful in an election year.


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How about this one? ultracrepidarian

It's a noun meaning: a person who gives opinions and advice on matters outside their knowledge

Love it. Social media seems to have a plethora of ultracrepidarians.


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This one came my way today:

harmratia - a noun meaning critical or tragic flaw

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Oh my - I have just come across this thread and you have me laughing ... I can say which was my favourite but nullibiquitous came close along with Mona's suggestion of it describing kids' homework! As a English Tutor I have been looking everywhere for this. Nullibiquitous too is the help you need 3 days before Christmas when the kitchen is breathing fire because it's your turn to entertain the extended family including all the cousins AND Uncle Scrooge.

Other words that come to mind that sort of fit with this theme are portmanteau words - words made up of two others which produce new meaning. Properties and Opportunity (used by a real estate person) become 'Propertunites' or a good one I saw as a business name in the UK 'Shoeligans' ... a children's shoe store. There are so many more, I used to collect them - have just gone blank.

Anyway I am going to go over these words above and see how many I can use - thing is, with the dumbing down of everything, so much is being lost because many are happy with the few words used in an everyday life so why use more?

Thank you for the smiles,


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Plumbeous -resembling lead would a naval ship be described as plumbeous?

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Orotund an adjective from WordGenius:

Full, powerful sound
or
Pompous

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