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Posted By: Doctor_Maria "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 01/24/06 03:37 AM
In this forum I will ask medical-related questions that you should be able to easily research. Post your response when you feel comfortable with the answer. Every 1-2 weeks I will award the best respondents with the coveted [color:"green"] PSEUDO-MD DEGREE [/color] <img src="/images/graemlins/king.gif" alt="" />While it means nothing in the real world, in our forum it is a distinction which lets others know you are a health savvy senior.

The goal of these exercises is to get you to learn about common conditions so you will know when to seek medical attention and what you can do to avoid complications from these illnesses.

[color:"red"] PLEASE NOTE THAT UNTIL I GIVE THE 'STAMP OF APPROVAL' ON A POST YOU SHOULD NOT CONSIDER THE POST AS VERIFIED MEDICAL INFORMATION. [/color]


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[color:"blue"] Question 1[/color]

Can anyone tell the group what a mini-stroke means?
Next week I will review the responses and reward the best 1 or 2 respondents with the coveted "Pseudo-MD Degree."
Posted By: Rhonda C Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 01/24/06 03:54 AM
A mini-stroke is a TIA (transient ischemic attack) which occurs when an area of the brain is deprived of oxygen. The symptoms of a mini-stroke do not last as long as the symptoms of a stroke. Having mini-strokes increases your likelihood of having strokes in the future.
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 01/24/06 03:55 AM
EXCELLENT.

You are definitely in the running for the Pseudo-MD degree, but we must wait for other responses.

Good job. <img src="/images/graemlins/rolling.gif" alt="" />
Posted By: babyquacker Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 01/24/06 10:46 PM
A mini stroke is like a regular stroke, just like Rhonda said, only less severe. Unfortunately, when the symptoms of a stroke occur, a person should not waste time trying to figure out how serious it is, but seek medical attention.

Symptoms can vary, depending on what part of the brain is affected, but a sudden onset of problems with speech, hearing, vision, coordination, balance (even response) when accompanied by a severe headache or not, is reason enough to seek immediate medical attention. Every minute counts if there is a part of your brain that is being deprived of oxygen, either from a clot or a bleed.

If by the time you reach the emergency room the symptoms are getting better, then you are lucky to be where there is help to figure out what caused the "brain attack". If you are still as bad, the doctors have 3 hours from the start of the "brain attack" to give medicine to save the brain from dying from lack of oxygen.

Age does not matter, either. I had this happen to me 11 months ago, when I was 53, with no heart disease, no medical problems, so I figured (see, I said "figured" since I was so young and not at risk) that I was just having a TIA so I waited until my husband got home, and rested... etc and didn't go to the doctor until the next morning, when I could barely write or talk and was dragging my right foot. I learned all these facts the hard way and have been rehabilitating myself since.

I was fortunate that I only killed a portion of my brain about the size of a dime/nickel, in my left hemisphere, in my language center. Now, I have been blessed that most of my deficits have been recovered and I am back to teaching and writing to my friends at BellaOnline (which I missed when my right hand wouldn't work and my words didn't come).

It is now my mission to tell everyone who will listen that the time to find out the difference in strokes and TIAs is AFTER the episode is over and you are healthy, not while you are going through it. Get immediately to a hospital and let THEM decide what to do and save yourself and your family all the hassles of being a stroke patient; disabled, unable to walk and talk and think normally.

Trish
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 01/25/06 05:16 AM
Unbelievable testimony! Thank you so very much for sharing this extremely important event in your life. This is just the type of information people need to know to save their own lives. I applaud you for your perserverance, courage, and dedication to educating others. We (the health care profession) need many, many more like you! There are not enough doctors and nurses to spread the word to all who need to hear it.

Please, keep telling your story. You can impact so many people's lives with this tremendous information and the sincerity in which you freely give it.

Thanks again.
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/06/06 12:21 AM
Winner of the Pseudo-MD Degree for the topic TIA is...
Babyquacker! Her willingness to share her personal story and her knowledge of the disease process make her the 1st winner of the coveted Pseudo-MD Degree.

Congrat!
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/06/06 12:23 AM
Dear Babyquacker,

Your kindness in sharing your story for others to learn from and your knowledge of TIAs have made you the winner of the 1st coveted Pseudo-MD Degree. Congrats! Sorry, no diploma comes with this title, but look on the bright side, malpractice premiums don't come either. <img src="/images/graemlins/easter.gif" alt="" />
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/06/06 12:25 AM
New topic: Who can tell everyone the signficance between the different types of cholesterol?
Posted By: babyquacker Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/06/06 07:18 AM
Thank you so much for this prestigeous award. <img src="/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> And to think I didn't have to spend money on the malpractice insurance! <img src="/images/graemlins/music.gif" alt="" />

I certainly hope that some of the simple, early warning signs I had, make people realize that they are never too young or too healthy to also have a problem. <img src="/images/graemlins/blush.gif" alt="" /> From my own experience, I hope my family and friends don't have to learn the hard way to get immediate help instead of waiting when they notice something weird going on! <img src="/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" />

Again, Doctor Maria, thanks for the opportunity for sharing my story (cause I love to talk (or type) now that I can!!) and thanks for making me the 1ST BellaMember to receive the Pseudo-MD degree. <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Trish
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/06/06 03:29 PM
Babyquacker,

It was my pleasure to award you this honor. You CERTAINLY deserve it. People have tremendous power to save themselves, their friends, and their family members (and also perfect strangers). Your contribution is extremely important. Please keep spreading the word. You may prevent some loving wife from losing the love of her life and change the course of her destiny!
Posted By: babyquacker Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/07/06 10:06 PM
The question for the new topic "what is the significance between the different types of cholesterol?"

Some would say that most of what tastes good is bad for you, thus the bad cholesterol...which comes from rich, fatty, fried, foods made with stuff from animals instead of plants (like candy, donuts, biscuits, gravy, fried chicken, french fries, apple pie ala mode, ice cream sundaes, excessive dairy products.

The bad cholesterol is LDL and Normal is <100 and High Risk is > 190, so intermediate is between 130 - 189, obviously the lower the better.

Other foods tastes good, are good for you AND have GOOD cholesterol...like fresh fruits, nuts, lean meats, whole wheat bread, skim milk, yogurt, green, yellow and red vegetables and beans, things that are grown in the ground.

Good cholesterol HDL should be >40 for Normal and High Risk would be <40.

Triglycerides should be <150. Your total cholesterol is supposed to be <200 for Normal with High Risk >240.

Trish
Posted By: Doctor_Maria Re: "Pseudo-MD Degree" Award - 02/09/06 06:03 PM
Pretty good, Babyquacker. You obviously do a lot of reading, and I'm impressed. It is important to note, however, that depending on the products used, some items, such as candy, donuts, biscuits, and french fries may be totally free of any form of cholesterol. (Many manufacturers are coming over to the healthy way of thinking and have changed how they produce their products). Therefore, it is always important to read the labels when you shop.
Keep up the reading and don't stop spreading your important health messages.

Maria
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