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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #927698
05/07/18 09:29 AM
05/07/18 09:29 AM
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Skywatching hints for this week from Steve Cariddi:
Quote
The Moon is a waning crescent this week, generally being visible in the predawn sky. Venus is bright and easily seen in the western sky at sunset. Jupiter is at opposition on Tuesday, when it will rise at sunset and be visible all night. It shines brightly among the faint stars of Libra and is highest in the south around 1am local time. Saturn rises around 1am local time; Mars rises about an hour later. Both are best seen in the predawn southern sky, among the stars of Sagittarius.


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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #927737
05/09/18 04:12 PM
05/09/18 04:12 PM
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Here is Brian Ventrudo's guide to observing Jupiter. If you have access to a telescope, you'll be able to see a lot of interesting things, but decent binoculars will also be helpful.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #927829
05/14/18 06:48 PM
05/14/18 06:48 PM
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The sky this week from Steve Cariddi:
Quote
The Moon is new on Tuesday, the start of a new lunar month. Look for our nearest celestial neighbor a few nights later, low in the west or southwest sky after sunset. Each night it will move farther east (left) and get a bit higher and fatter, but every night this week it will be a crescent (less than half illuminated). On Thursday night, look for the Moon a few degrees to the east (left) of Venus, which is very bright in the western sky after sunset. By the time night falls, you should be able to see Jupiter (in the constellation Libra) shining bright and low in the east. It is just past opposition, so it will be visible most of the night, being at its highest point around midnight. Saturn is also rising around midnight (in Sagittarius), followed by Mars (in Capricorn) about an hour later. The two planets will be at the highest in the south just before dawn.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #927906
05/19/18 10:31 PM
05/19/18 10:31 PM
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Astronomy magazine gives some tips for observing the night sky from the 18th to the 25th of May. Some things you'll be able to see without optical aids. For others, even if you don't have a telescope, binoculars can be helpful.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #927927
05/21/18 06:25 PM
05/21/18 06:25 PM
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Reminder from Bruce McClure of EarthSky:

Tonight – May 21, 2018 – the half-lit first quarter moon passes 1.5 degrees (3 moon-diameters) north of Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Nearly everyone worldwide can use the moon to find the star Regulus on this night.

Just look for the moon in the evening sky. The nearby bright star will be Regulus.

There’s little chance of mistaking another star for Regulus, because Regulus is the only bright object within a stone’s throw of the May 21 moon.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #928139
05/31/18 08:59 AM
05/31/18 08:59 AM
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Mona - Astronomy Online content OP
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Which planets are visible from your location? What time do they rise and set tonight? Here you have the information you need about planets visible in the night sky in New York City. But most of us don't live in or near New York City! Just fill in your own location on the page, and it will give you your local information.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #928174
06/01/18 05:51 PM
06/01/18 05:51 PM
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EarthSky says
Quote
Before daybreak on June 1 to 3, watch for the moon near Mars and Saturn. Because the moon moves eastward in front of the constellations of the zodiac at the rate of about 1/2 degree (one moon-diameter) per hour, or about 13 degrees per day, look for the moon to change its position from day to day. It’ll be closest to Saturn on the morning of June 1, approximately between Saturn and Mars on June 2, and closest to Mars on June 3.


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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #928294
06/08/18 06:47 PM
06/08/18 06:47 PM
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Here's Brian Ventrudo's guide to The Night Sky This Month. Night by night details, suggestions, diagrams and pictures.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #928873
07/11/18 08:06 AM
07/11/18 08:06 AM
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Mona - Astronomy Online content OP
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CosmicPursuits gives the lowdown on the sky in July:
Quote
It’s another excellent month to feast your eyes on planets. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are all easily visible in the night sky with the unaided eye. And while Jupiter and Saturn remain large and bright and beautiful in a telescope, Mars is the main event this month as the planet makes its closest approach to Earth in 15 years. The planet will be a sight to behold without optics as it hovers fat and bright in the southeastern sky an hour or two after sunset, and it will be absolutely beautiful in a telescope. Half the world will also see a long and deep lunar eclipse, and a modest meteor shower arrives near the end of July.

12 July. Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation, its largest angular distance from the Sun. The planet will now begin to move quickly each day back toward the western horizon. It will reappear in the morning sky later in August.

13 July. New Moon, 02:48 UT

15 July. Another lovely view: look for Venus, a waxing crescent Moon, and the star Regulus in the western sky after sunset. All lie within about 5º of each other.

19 July. First Quarter Moon, 19:52 UT.

20 July. The gibbous Moon forms a triangle with brilliant Jupiter and the 2nd magnitude star Alpha Librae (also called Zubenelgenubi).

24 July. The Moon makes its way along the ecliptic and checks in with the planet Saturn in the constellation Sagittarius. Saturn reached opposition in late June and continues to put on its best show of the year. The planet is located above the Teapot of Sagittarius in the southeastern sky after sunset and remains visible all night long.

27 July. Mars reaches opposition, rising in the east as the Sun sets in the west. Oppositions of Mars only happen every two years and two months, and this apparition is the best since 2003. Mars makes its closest approach to Earth on July 30-31. You can’t miss it. Look to the constellation Capricorn in the southeast (or east in the southern hemisphere), just east of Sagittarius after sunset. You will see a blazing bright planet shining with a steady ochre glow. If you have a telescope, make the effort to observe Mars. You’ll get the best view when the planet is furthest above the horizon a couple of hours after midnight this month. It rises a little earlier each night. Go have a look. Mars won’t be this close again until 2050.

27 July. Full Moon, 20:20 UT

27-28 July. Observers in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia will enjoy a total lunar eclipse. In Europe, the partial phase of the eclipse gets underway as the Moon rises on the night of the 27th. In Australia, the Moon sets on the morning of the 28th as the eclipse is in progress. This will be a long eclipse with a total of 1 hour and 43 minutes of totality. Mars, which reaches opposition tonight and shines at a brilliant magnitude -2.8, lies just 5-6º away from the Moon during the eclipse. Alas, observers in North America will miss this event. But we still have Mars!

28 July. The Southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks. Look for 15-20 meteors per hour, with a path that traces back to the radiant in the constellation Aquarius. This somewhat weak shower favors southern-hemisphere observers. The best view is after midnight, and you can see these meteors anywhere in the sky.


Mona Evans
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Re: 2018 - Keep an eye on the sky [Re: Mona - Astronomy] #929139
07/25/18 05:09 PM
07/25/18 05:09 PM
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 7,357
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Mona - Astronomy Online content OP
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From EarthSky:
Quote
Earth will go between Mars and the sun later this week. It's Mars' best and brightest opposition since 2003. Note that the moon will be near Mars during Friday's total lunar eclipse. Start watching Mars and the moon tonight!

Even if you can't see the eclipse, you can still see Mars, weather permitting.

And you can see the eclipse online.
Coverage from the Virtual Telescope


Mona Evans
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